Trump honors D-Day veterans, U.S. & Mexico fail to a reach deal & one man's Bigfoot quest: The Morning Rundown

"You are the pride of our nation. You are the glory of our republic," President Donald Trump told the D-Day veterans.
Image: President Donald Trump sits next to WWII veterans during a ceremony to mark the 75th anniversary of the D-Day at the Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial in Colleville-sur-Mer, France
President Donald Trump sits next to WWII veterans during a ceremony to mark the 75th anniversary of D-Day at the Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial in Colleville-sur-Mer, France, on Thursday. Christian Hartmann / Reuters

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By Petra Cahill

Good morning, NBC News readers.

Seventy-five years ago they stormed the beaches of Normandy in the largest amphibious and airborne invasion in history.

Today, D-Day veterans returned to Normandy and world leaders gathered to honor the sacrifices of the thousands who fought to help turn the tide of World War II.

Here's what we're watching today.


Last remaining D-Day vets return as humble heroes to the beaches of Normandy

Most were little more than boys when they fought in one of the greatest battles in modern history and turned the Nazi tide. And now they are back. At the 75th anniversary celebrations of the D-Day landings, the last few remaining World War II veterans have been treated like rock stars by tourists and locals.

Arnold Raymond “Ray” Lambert, 98, shrugged off the bravery he showed that day as a medic in the 16th Infantry Regiment of the Army’s First Division.

“We knew that in order to stop Hitler and get rid of the evil things he was doing, we had to fight,” he said.

President Donald Trump, France's President Emmanuel Macron and other world leaders honored the veterans during a ceremony at the Normandy American Cemetery today.


75 Years Ago: Photos from the D-Day invasion

While under attack of heavy machine gun fire from the German coastal defense forces, these American soldiers wade ashore off the ramp of a U.S. Coast Guard landing craft on June 6, 1944, during the Allied landing operations at the Normandy.AP Photo

See a slideshow of archival images from the D-Day invasion.


U.S. and Mexico fail to reach deal as tariff deadline looms

In high stakes talks, American and Mexican negotiators failed to reach a deal Wednesday to prevent punitive U.S. tariffs from going into effect over border security.

Trump sparked the last-minute meeting between the two countries after announcing that the United States would impose a 5 percent tariff on all Mexican goods starting next month, saying the sweeping tariffs would rise monthly "until Mexico substantially stops the illegal inflow of aliens coming through its territory."

New figures from Customs and Border officials show that a record number of undocumented immigrants were stopped while crossing the border illegally in May.

Meantime, the Trump administration is cutting education, legal services and recreation at migrant children shelters, citing the spike in the number of children in custody.


Trump promised to put 'American truckers first.' Drivers say he hasn't delivered.

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"America first means putting American truckers first," the president said at an October 2017 event in Pennsylvania, where he touted the Republican tax bill ahead of its passage.

But a number of truck drivers, in interviews with NBC News, said that same tax bill is hurting their wallets.

"I've seen an $8,000 increase in my taxes this year," trucker Richard Robinson said.

Trump jumps up in the cab of an 18-wheeler truck on the South Lawn of the White House in March 2017. Melina Mara / The Washington Post via Getty Images file

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Plus


THINK about it

Former Trump adviser Paul Manafort may be transferred to New York City's infamous Rikers Island jail to await trial on state-level fraud charges. He will be held alone for his protection, but officials have argued that it won't be "solitary confinement."

Chandra Bozelko and Ryan Lo, who spent more than 18 months living under similar conditions, write in an opinion piece that no matter what you call it, the isolation amounts to torture.


Science + Tech = MACH

China recently unveiled a prototype for a new high-speed train that will "float" over tracks to hit 370 miles an hour.


Live BETTER

Think of the last conversation you had with someone you just met. Did certain moments feel awkward? Here's how to do it better, according to science.


Quote of the day

"We have, I hope, learned what can happen to a country like Germany, with its wonderful talents, if their worst people are allowed to be in control."

Alvan Markle III, a 100-year-old D-Day veteran.


One fun thing

Yeti persisted.

An Oregon man intent on proving the existence of the mythical creatures known as Bigfoot, Sasquatch, the Abominable Snowman and Yeti, managed to get the FBI to test hair and tissue samples in 1976 that he believed might help his case, according to newly released records.

The man who spurred that analysis, 93-year-old Peter Byrne, told CNBC on Wednesday that he still hasn’t given up hope of proving that Bigfoot is a real — if exceedingly rare — creature.

“It’s a great challenge,” he said.

This still frame image from video provided by Bigfoot Global LLC, shows what is claimed by them to be a bigfoot or sasquatch creature in an undisclosed area of a northern Georgia forest in June 2008.Bigfoot Global LLC / AP file

Thanks for reading the Morning Rundown.

If you have any comments — likes, dislikes — drop me an email at: petra@nbcuni.com

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Thanks, Petra