Trump set to travel for first time in weeks as U.S. death toll nears 70,000

Recovering COVID-19 patients describe symptoms that won't go away.
Image: People gather at Clearwater Beach after Florida eased social distancing restrictions on May 4, 2020.
People gather at Clearwater Beach after Florida eased social distancing restrictions on Monday. Daniel Slim / AFP - Getty Images

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By Petra Cahill

Good morning, NBC News readers.

While the U.S. death toll from the coronavirus pandemic inches near 70,000, we have a report on the ongoing symptoms of fever, fatigue and fear many recovering COVID-19 patients suffer from.

Here's what we're watching this Tuesday morning.


Trump to take first trip outside D.C. in weeks as more states open up

President Donald Trump will travel outside the D.C. area for the first time in more than a month later today when he visits a Honeywell mask manufacturing facility in Phoenix, Arizona.

His travels outside the Beltway come as more states began to partially reopen and lift some social distancing restrictions Monday.

For many businesses across the country, reopening means managing a high-wire balancing act between serving customers and maintaining safety.

Meantime, a new draft report from the federal government predicted that by June 1, the daily death toll could nearly double to 3,000 per day.

So far nearly 70,000 people have been killed in the United States by COVID-19, the disease caused by coronavirus.

Globally, COVID-19 has now killed more than a quarter of a million people, according to Johns Hopkins University's count.


'Is this permanent?' Recovering COVID-19 patients report weeks of ongoing illness

Kate Porter has had a fever nearly every day for 50 days. She can't shake the extreme exhaustion that hit when she became infected with the coronavirus nearly two months ago.

The longevity of her symptoms are unlike anything she's ever experienced. "I know it sounds crazy," Porter said, "but is this permanent?"

She's not alone. COVID-19 patients who are not sick enough to be hospitalized have little guidance on how to recover. There is no specific drug or treatment, other than rest, fluids and fever-reducing medicine such as Tylenol.

Many recovering COVID-19 patients have reported weeks of fever, fatigue, fear and uncertainty.


Did the coronavirus escape from a Chinese lab? Experts suspect a different, more likely source

There has been a barrage of contradictory claims in recent days about how U.S. officials believe the coronavirus emerged from the Chinese city of Wuhan, what evidence they have and when Trump was first briefed about it.

Here is what we actually know.


Higher fares, longer waits and no booze: How coronavirus will change the way we fly

Higher ticket prices, temperature checks before boarding, and no inflight alcohol: Airline travel in the post-coronavirus era will look very different from the low-cost "getaway" trips of the past — and it ain't pretty.

But airlines are keen to see passenger volume return, and have been making significant changes to prevent the spread of the disease.

In an industry that has seen a decline in traffic by 95 percent, and two airlines already forced into bankruptcy, the pressure to get it right is enormous.


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Plus

  • A Michigan security guard was killed in a dispute over the need to wear a mask before entering a store.
  • NBC News Chairman Andy Lack will step down and leave the company at the end of the month.
  • Greg Zanis, an Illinois carpenter known as the "The Cross Man" for his tireless effort to memorialize victims of mass shootings, died at 69.
  • Senate office said it lacks "discretion" to release possible Biden complaint.

THINK about it

Kim Jong Un's disappearance raised many questions. And we still don't have answers, retired U.S. Army colonel and former member of the National Security Council Jeff McCausland writes in an opinion piece.


BETTER TODAY

Can't go out to celebrate Cinco de Mayo? Make this healthy (and super easy) guacamole at home.


Shopping

Feeling like your roots could use some love? Here are the best hair color and hair dye kits, according to experts.


Quote of the day

"We fall into the category of not critical and dying, but not asymptomatic. That's a very lonely, unclear place to be."

-- Andrew Dumont, a 32-year-old who is still suffering from COVID-19 symptoms two months since he first got ill.


One fun thing

It's a whole new world out there for the graduating class of 2020.

The Thunderbird School of Global Management at Arizona State University announced that it will be using robots to stand in for students at its graduation ceremony.

And a "virtual prom" hosted Saturday on Instagram Live gave more than 500 high school seniors a chance to celebrate and participate in a rite of passage, albeit remotely.

The prom "gave teens an opportunity to pull themselves out of the gloom, put on some red lipstick and heels and dance the night away," said one attendee.

The brother and sister team of Hannah, 18, and Charlie Lucas, 15, hosted the virtual prom.Hannah Lucas

Thanks for reading the Morning Rundown.

Please send me any comments or questions you have on the newsletter: petra@nbcuni.com

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Be safe and stay healthy, Petra Cahill