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An 11-year-old boy was found dead in a vehicle that was swept away by flood waters in Louisiana on Monday, as persistent thunderstorms threaten flash floods across a huge swath of the country throughout the week.

Multiple northern Louisiana emergency agencies responded to a call Monday morning about a vehicle that had been carried into a creek by floodwaters, according to a statement from the Ruston Police Department.

The driver of the vehicle, a woman who was reported to be a grandmother to the boys, was able to escape but a 7-year-old boy and 11-year-boy old were missing.

The 7-year-old was found alive clinging to a tree, according to the statement. The 11-year-old's body was found in the vehicle after the waters receded, police said.

A photojournalist's car was also swept away by high waters in Missouri on Sunday, but thanks to the help from a good Samaritan, he survived.

Eric Schultz, a KCTV reporter, was covering the weather when floodwaters overtook his car, according to the station. Kalen Shrout was driving on the same Lawson, Missouri, road when his car started sinking. He was able to get himself and his family out of the water, but then he jumped back in to rescue Schultz.

"I think the Lord put me here to be able to help out — to help save Eric — and I'm just glad my family is alright," Shrout said.

Missouri and Louisiana can expect even more rain throughout the week, according to Weather.com. And thunderstorms are forecast from Colorado and eastern New Mexico to parts of Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas and Nebraska.

The combination of slow-moving storms and saturated ground make for perfect flooding conditions, according to Weather.com, which reported that parts of Texas, Oklahoma, Nebraska and Arkansas are close to breaking rainfall records in May. Parts of Texas, Oklahoma and Kansas were under flash-flood warnings Monday night, according to the National Weather Service.

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