IE 11 is not supported. For an optimal experience visit our site on another browser.

62 arrested in Occupy DC, judge clears way for Boston eviction

Police arrest Occupy DC demonstrators who blocked K Street in downtown Washington on Wednesday.The protesters converged on K Street, home to many lobbying firms, to highlight their dissatisfaction with corporate influence in politics.
Police arrest Occupy DC demonstrators who blocked K Street in downtown Washington on Wednesday.The protesters converged on K Street, home to many lobbying firms, to highlight their dissatisfaction with corporate influence in politics.Jose Luis Magana / AP

Updated at 6:15 p.m. ET: A court in Massachusetts ruled on Wednesday that Occupy Boston protesters are no longer immune from eviction from a site in downtown Boston where they have been hunkered down for more than two months, the Boston Globe reports.

The Suffolk Superior Court judge denied a preliminary injunction that would have protected the protesters from no-camping rules in Dewey Square, the Globe report said. Protesters had a temporary restraining order that expired with the judge’s ruling on Wednesday.

See the Boston court decision

Boston’s City Council has so far not moved to get rid of the encampment, but it may be laying legal groundwork to do so. The Council website said that the fire department had “identified some public health concerns” in the Occupy camp and issued a list of basic health and safety tips for protesters.

Police have evicted Occupy protesters from their settlements in New York, Portland, Los Angeles, San Francisco and Philadelphia in recent weeks, citing health and safety concerns.

“The police commissioner is pleased with the decision and believes that it is important that the city has discretion in determining how to proceed,” Boston police spokeswoman Elaine Driscoll told the Globe.

Updated at 6:10 p.m. ET: Police arrested 62 protesters linked to the Occupy protests on Wednesday and charged nearly all of them with obstructing a public highway in the nation’s capital, a police spokesman said.

The arrests occurred in the heart of the lobbying district as part of a day of protests in Washington, DC, by the grassroots movement, according to their Twitter account and a live video stream of the actions. About a dozen protesters appeared to by lying down on the road in the area of K Street, home to many lobbying firms.

Cecilia Azurduy, 27, quit her job at a property management firm to join OccupyKSt. She told msnbc.com that the protesters were “trying to shut down the revolving door of Congress to lobbyists.”

“The lobbyists on K Street (have) been instrumental in buying out our government on behalf of the 1 percent, so we wanted to clog up their business because they’ve done a lot to mess up the livelihoods of millions of Americans,” Azurduy said.

Flanked on both sides by police officers, some mounted on horses, the protesters appeared to be underneath plastic coverings, with a few sheltering under umbrellas.

“The whole world is watching,” they chanted.

All but one of the protesters were charged with obstructing a public highway, a misdemeanor, said Hugh Carew, an officer and spokesman for the Metropolitan Police Department. They were eligible for citation release, he said.

The final charge was misdemeanor assault on a police officer, said Carew, who did not have information on what led to that charge being imposed.

A horse stepped on a woman’s foot at the protest, but she declined medical treatment, he said.

Though the protesters received support online, not everyone was pleased.

"@OccupyKSt I would suggest that you actually inconvenienced working people simply trying to do their jobs and support their families," wrote a person identified as Michael Freeman.

To which, OccupyKSt replied: "We are working people trying to do our jobs and support our families too. I know traffic sucks, but oppression sucks more."

The protesters plan to continue their demonstrations into the evening with a march they will take them to Freedom Plaza, the White House, the National Mall and the U.S. Supreme Court.

Read more content from msnbc.com and NBC News: