Child porn found in documents Alex Jones sent to lawyers of Sandy Hook families, court filing says

Jones denies any knowledge of the images, and Infowars describes the emails as a "malware attack attempting to embed" child porn on their servers.
Image: Alex Jones speaks to reporters outside of a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on Sept. 5, 2018.
Alex Jones speaks to reporters outside of a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on Sept. 5, 2018.Drew Angerer / Getty Images file

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By Tim Stelloh

Lawyers representing families of Sandy Hook massacre victims who are suing conspiracy theorist Alex Jones said they received child pornography in documents they were sent by the Infowars founder, according to court papers filed Monday in Connecticut.

Consultants working with the lawyers discovered the images in the documents that were requested during a court hearing in April, the filing states. A lawyer representing the families immediately alerted the FBI, according to the filing.

“The FBI advised counsel that its review located numerous additional illegal images, which had apparently been sent to Infowars email address,” the filing says.

During a segment on Infowars last week, Jones’ lawyer Norm Pattis said the FBI cleared Jones after an inquiry found “there was no suggestion that anyone here wanted that material, ever looked at it or even knew about it.”

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Any "suggestion that anyone at Infowars knew child [pornography] was embedded in emails is risible," Pattis added in a statement to NBC News.

The FBI did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Jones did not immediately respond to a request for comment Monday, but Infowars has described the emails as a "malware attack attempting to embed" child porn on Jones' servers.

During a profanity-fueled segment of "The Alex Jones Show" on Friday, Jones said he was offering a $1 million reward to anyone who could track down the person who tried “to set me up with child porn.”

In a later segment, Pattis clarified that the reward was actually $100,000 for information that leads to the arrest and prosecution of the culprit.

Monday's filing also says that Jones threatened Chris Mattei, one of the lawyers working with the Sandy Hook families, during an Infowars segment in which Jones pounded on a picture of Mattei and claimed the attorney tried to frame him.

“This court has an obligation to protect the attorneys, parties, and the judicial process,” the filing says.

In the statement, Pattis said that Jones didn't threaten anyone.

"To suggest otherwise is to engage in precious pleading," he said.

The families of six Sandy Hook Elementary School victims sued Jones for defamation last year over his repeated claims that the shooting — which left 20 first-graders and six adults dead — was a hoax.