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Co-defendant in Aaron Hernandez case ordered held without bail

A Florida man prosecutors say was an accessory the evening former New England Patriots tight end allegedly murdered Odin Lloyd was ordered held without bail Monday.Ernest Wallace, 41, known as "Fish," turned himself in to Miramar, Fla.

A Florida man prosecutors say was an accessory the evening former New England Patriots tight end allegedly murdered Odin Lloyd was ordered held without bail Monday.

Ernest Wallace, 41, known as "Fish," turned himself in to Miramar, Fla., police June 28 and was handed over Friday to officials in Massachusetts, where the Bristol County District Attorney's Office charged him with being an accessory after the fact of the June 17 slaying.

Wallace mouthed "I love you" to some people sitting in the courtroom during the arraignment, according to NBC affiliate WHDH. He pleaded not-guilty and will be held without bail until a July 22 pre-trial hearing.

Hernandez, charged with first-degree murder, is accused of orchestrating the execution-style killing of Lloyd, 27, near the NFL star's North Attleboro, Mass., home.

Prosecutors say Hernandez was upset that Lloyd, a semi-pro football player, talked with the wrong people at a nightclub.

Hernandez has pleaded not guilty to the murder charge and his lawyers contend that the case against him is circumstantial. He was denied bail and is being held in a Massachusetts jail.

Authorities in late June charged another man in connection with Lloyd's murder — Carlos Ortiz of Bristol, Conn., the city where Hernandez grew up. He was charged as a fugitive and agreed to return to the Bay State, authorities said, where he was arraigned June 28.

Authorities discovered Lloyd riddled with bullets in an industrial pit a half-mile from the residence where Hernandez lived with his fiancée and their eight-month-old daughter, according to prosecutors.

The Associated Press contributed to this report. NBC News' Richard Esposito, Elizabeth Chuck, and Erin McClam also contributed.

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