Florida Steroid Supplier Anthony P. Bosch Arrested

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A Florida man who admitted supplying performance-enhancing drugs to New York Yankees star Alex Rodriguez was arrested in Miami Tuesday and agreed to plead guilty to federal drug charges.

Anthony P. Bosch, 50, of Key Biscayne and a Miami man, 52-year-old Yuri Sucart, were among seven people charged with conspiring to sell steroids to professional sports figures and high school athletes as young as 15.

Prosecutors said Sucart, a cousin of Rodriguez, recruited athletes to be customers by saying that he knew a doctor who could help improve their performance.

Rodriguez is under a one-year suspension, the longest punishment ever imposed by Major League Baseball for using banned substances.

"Professional athletes who use drugs to enhance their performance are not heroes. They are cheaters," said Wifredo Ferrer, the U.S. Attorney for South Florida.

In court documents, Bosch admitted that although he introduced himself to athletes as "Dr. Tony Bosch" or simply "Dr. T," he never had a license to practice medicine or prescribe drugs.

For a span of four years, until the fall of 2012, he provided testosterone in ready-to-inject syringes, creams, and lozenges to professional athletes, who paid up to $12,000 a month, Bosch admitted.

No athletes who received the banned drugs were identified in court documents, but Bosch has publicly admitted giving performance-enhancing drugs to Rodriguez. Thirteen other players whose names were found in clinic records were disciplined last year.

"Professional athletes who use drugs to enhance their performance are not heroes. They are cheaters."

Last year, Bosch cooperated extensively with investigators for Major League Baseball, giving highly detailed accounts of the drugs he provided to Rodriguez and the advice he gave on how to use them while avoided detection.

Bosch also admitted that he and his co-conspirators provided the drugs to Florida high school athletes, who paid up to $600 a month for testosterone and other substances.

"They provided easy access to these dangerous concoctions of steroids and human growth hormones to impressionable high school kids, one the promise that they will play better, recover faster from injury, and have more energy," Ferrer said.

Investigators said the drugs came from black market suppliers, sometimes in unmarked vials.

"These youngsters had no idea what they were putting into their bodies," said Mark Trouville, the Special Agent in Charge of the DEA's Miami office. The black market drugs, he said, were made by "some clown in his basement with a bucket, a burner, and a very dangerously limited knowledge of chemistry."

Last year, Bosch cooperated extensively with investigators for Major League Baseball, giving highly detailed accounts of the drugs he provided to Rodriguez and the advice he gave on how to use them while avoided detection.

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