June 2 coverage of nationwide unrest and ongoing protests

George Floyd's death has sparked protests across the country.
Image: Protest against the death in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd, in New York
Demonstrators gather after curfew during a protest in New York City on June 2, 2020.Brendan McDermid / Reuters

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This live coverage has now ended. Continue reading June 3 coverage of George Floyd's death and the nationwide protests.

Protests over the in-custody death of George Floyd passed the one-week mark Tuesday with no signs of slowing down. From New York to North Carolina and Los Angeles to Minnesota, thousands hit the streets while Floyd’s family called for the arrests of three other officers involved in the Memorial Day incident.

As authorities across the country respond to destructive and chaotic demonstrations with curfews and mass arrests, there’s been one notable exception: Baltimore.

In Minnesota, Gov. Tim Walz announced a sweeping civil rights investigation of the police department in Minneapolis, where Floyd was killed, saying the inquiry will root out "systemic racism that is generations deep."

Download the NBC News app for the latest updates.

White House releases video of Trump walking to church set to triumphant music

The White House released a video of President Donald Trump striding to fire-damaged St. John's Episcopal Church set to triumphant music after a speech in which he said that he would use the U.S. military to stop the riots across the country.

While Trump spoke, sirens wailed and flashbang grenades popped across the street where police backed by the National Guard stormed into a peaceful protest being held before curfew outside the White House. But the video posted by the White House on Twitter contains no images of the violence, and instead shows Trump striding — accompanied by members of his administration and the military — to the church where he held a Bible and posed for photos.   

The Episcopal bishop of Washington blasted Trump on Monday night, saying it was "deeply offensive" for him to use the St. John's "as a backdrop and the Bible as a prop" for a photo-op.

Police shot, hit by vehicles in George Floyd protests

Police officers were among those injured across the U.S. overnight amid continuing protests and violence sparked by the in-custody death of George Floyd in Minneapolis last week.

Four officers in St. Louis, Missouri, were shot after a peaceful protest turned violent in the early hours Tuesday. Two officers were hit in the leg, one in the foot and one in the arm, St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department Commissioner Col. John W. Hayden said during a news conference.

"Some coward fired shots at officers," he said. "Thankfully, they're alive. They're alive."

Read the full story here.

E.U. foreign policy chief says he's 'appalled' by Floyd's death

The European Union is "shocked and appalled" by the death of George Floyd in police custody, the bloc's top diplomat said on Tuesday, calling it "an abuse of power" and warning against further excessive use of force.

"Like the people of the United States, we are shocked and appalled by the death of George Floyd ... all societies must remain vigilant against the excessive use of force," Josep Borrell, the E.U.'s foreign policy chief, told reporters.

Borrell called Floyd's death a "very, very unhappy" one and said it showed "an abuse of power" by law enforcement. "We condemn racism of any kind ... we trust in the ability of the Americans to come together, to heal as a nation."

NYPD officer hit by car in the Bronx

A New York police officer was hit by a car in the Bronx early on Tuesday, the NY Police Department confirmed after a video of the incident was posted on social media. However, it's unclear from the video whether the police officer was intentionally targeted.

The New York Police Department told NBC News that the officer was hit by a black sedan when he got out of an unmarked car while checking reports of break-ins in the neighborhood.

Video footage on Twitter (warning: contains profanity) appears to show the moment the officer was struck. The sedan fled the scene, the department said.

NYPD said the officer was taken to a local hospital with serious injuries, but is in stable condition. No arrests have been made. 

St. Louis police say 4 officers hit by gunfire amid violent protests

Four police officers were struck by gunfire in St. Louis amid violence that followed protests, police said early Tuesday. None of the injuries were believed to be life-threatening and all the officers were conscious, police said. They have been taken to area hospitals.

St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department Commissioner John W. Hayden said at a news conference that the four officers were near a police line when they felt pain and realized they were injured. People had pelted officers with rocks and fireworks throughout the night, he said, and looted stores.

"I believe some coward randomly shot at the police line," Hayden said. Two officers were hit in the leg, one in the foot and one in the arm, Hayden said, adding that police have not made any arrests, and did not immediately know if there was a single shooter or more than one. 

ACLU urges governments to ignore Trump comments on military

The American Civil Liberties Union on Monday urged governors, mayors and police chiefs to ignore President Donald Trump's comments on using the military amid violent protests on cities across the country.

"This country does not need authoritarian tactics like military intervention to silence dissent," the ACLU said in a statement. "It needs the political will to dismantle the deep-seated racism and inequity that permeates our institutions — especially our police departments."

"Governors, mayors, and police chiefs would do well to heed and hear the voices of the protesters, while ignoring the words of Donald Trump," he ACLU said.

Trump in a Rose Garden address earlier Monday said in part: "If a city or state refuses to take the actions necessary to defend the life and property of their residents, then I will deploy the United States military and quickly solve the problem for them."

The National Guard has been activated by several governors in order to support law enforcement in violence amid protests sparked by the death of George Floyd. Curfews have been imposed in some areas.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo tweeted: "The president is calling out the American military against American citizens" and said that peaceful protests were forced back so that the president could have what Cuomo called a "photo op at a church."

"It's all just a reality TV show for this president," Cuomo, a Democrat, wrote. "Shameful." New York City has seen violent clashes and vandalism  amid protests over Floyd's death. To activate the military to operate in the U.S., Trump would have to invoke the 213-year-old Insurrection Act. 

Committee to Protect Journalists: 125 press freedom infringements since Friday

At least 125 press freedom violations were reported by journalists across the U.S. in the last three days of protest, the Committee to Protect Journalists said.

The independent non-profit said in a statement that the infringements include 20 arrests and several accounts of journalists being hit with tear gas, pepper spray and rubber bullets, and called on local and state authorities to stop targeting media workers.

“We are horrified by the continued use of harsh and sometimes violent actions of police against journalists doing their jobs. These are direct violations of press freedom, a fundamental Constitutional value of the United States,” said CPJ Program Director Carlos Martinez de la Serna. “We call on local and state officials to explicitly exempt the news media from curfew regulations so that journalists are able to report freely.”

Hundreds detained on bridge in Dallas protest

Nearly 200 people were detained after police surrounded protesters in Dallas on the Margaret Hunt Hill Bridge, confronting them and firing what appeared to be rubber bullets, NBC DFW reported.

Police illuminated the bridge at 7 p.m. Monday and hemmed in the protesters, who originated their march at the nearby Frank Crowley Courts Building. Dallas police Chief U. Renee Hall issued a curfew in parts of the city for 7 p.m., but the order did not include the courthouse or the bridge.

People began yelling at officers, which is when the police started firing rubber bullets, according to NBC DFW.