June 3 coverage of nationwide unrest and ongoing protests

George Floyd's death has sparked protests across the country.
Image: US-POLITICS-RACE-UNREST
Protesters hold up their hands during a demonstration outside the White House on June 3, 2020.Eric Baradat / AFP - Getty Images

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This live coverage has now ended. Continue reading June 4 coverage of George Floyd's death and the nationwide protests.

As protesters nationwide continued to hit the streets Wednesday, three more former Minneapolis police officers were charged in the death of George Floyd.

The three former officers, Tou Thao, Thomas Lane and J. Alexander Kueng, were charged with aiding and abetting murder, according to criminal complaints filed by the state of Minnesota. The murder charge against the fourth, Derek Chauvin, was also elevated to second-degree, from third-degree.

Curfews and arrests have done little to deter determined protesters in cities like New York, Los Angeles and Washington. Overall, however, demonstrations on Tuesday night and Wednesday have passed more peacefully than those held in previous days.

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Family-friendly protest events find traction on Facebook

In addition to the evening protests now occurring in hundreds of American cities and towns, family-friendly protest events are being organized to allow children and parents with young kids to take to the streets during the day to speak out against the recent death of George Floyd at the hands of law enforcement, as well as the broader issues of racial and social injustice.

Such events have already taken place in Oakland — with another scheduled for Wednesday evening — as well as others set for New York City, Culver City, Calif,; Seattle, Columbus, Ohio; Dallas, and Lakeland, Florida, among many others.

In the Dallas neighborhood of Oak Cliff, attendees are encouraged to “talk with kids and neighbors and create some bold, artful messaging for everyone who walks by. What do you want them to know and do right now? What kind of change do you want to see in the world?”

George Floyd: From aspiring rapper to symbol of police violence against black men

Before his name became a rallying cry for Americans fed up with the police killings of unarmed black men, he was an aspiring Houston rapper nicknamed “Big Floyd” whose lines were steeped in the lore of his beloved Third Ward neighborhood.

George Floyd was part of an influential hip-hop collective called the Screwed Up Click that emerged in the 1990s with a distinct slowed-down sound that some say moved at the pace of the steamy city on a hot summer night.

His deep-voiced drawl was featured on at least a dozen mixtapes created by the group’s leader, Robert Earl Davis Jr., aka DJ Screw. And always, the focus of Floyd’s freestyling was on the things that mattered most to him: hanging with friends, dreaming about making his mark, home.

But when Floyd died on May 25, beneath the knee of a Minneapolis police officer, he was five years and more than a thousand miles removed from the historic center of African American culture in Houston where he grew up in the Cuney Homes housing project.

And when Floyd returns home to Houston on Monday for a public memorial, it will be in a coffin. “It’s going to be a big deal for our city to bring him home,” said Houston Police Chief Art Acevedo.

Read the full story here.

NYC curfew to stay in place until Monday

New York City's curfew will continue through this week and upcoming weekend, until some coronavirus-shuttered businesses reopen on Monday morning, Mayor Bill de Blasio said.

The 8 p.m.-to-5 a.m. shutdown is still necessary, according to City Hall, as thousands of protesters take to the streets to decry the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis

A host of New York businesses, such as non-essential retail and wholesale, partially come back Monday after months of coronavirus-forced shutdown.

Mayor de Blasio told reporters on Wednesday that businesses should have enough time to prepare their facilities during daytime hours, leading up to 5 a.m. Monday.

"I’m sorry that it’ll be an additional challenge for those who might be having to do some repairs right now because of those bad couple of nights, but I know they can get it done," he said.

Ella Jones elected first black mayor of Ferguson nearly six years after death of Michael Brown

In the midst of widespread civil unrest in the United States after the police killing of George Floyd comes a spark of hope.

Ella Jones was elected on Tuesday as the first female and black Mayor of Ferguson — the St. Louis suburb where 18-year-old Michael Brown was killed almost six years ago. 

Brown's death sparked protests in 2014, solidified the nascent Black Lives Matter movement, and put Ferguson under the national spotlight.

Jones, 65, beat fellow council member Heather Robinett in Tuesday's non-partisan election for a three-year term, which starts later this month.

Retired black officer David Dorn killed by looters in St. Louis, police say

David Dorn, a retired black police captain in St. Louis, died during widespread unrest on Tuesday.

Dorn, 77, was "murdered last night by a looter," while guarding a pawn shop, city officials told reporters, adding that surveillance tools would be used to identify the criminals.  

St. Louis' "Ethical Society of Police," founded in 1972 by black officers to address corruption and racial discrimination, mourned the captain's loss. 

"He was the type of brother that would’ve given his life to save them if he had to. Violence is not the answer, whether it’s a citizen or officer. RIP Captain!" the organization tweeted.

President Trump also offered his condolences to Dorn's family. Tweeting that Dorn had been "viciously shot and killed by despicable looters." Trump also shared a memorial fund set up for Dorn's family, which had raised over $150,000 Wednesday morning. 

Separately in St. Louis, four officers were shot at on Tuesday after a peaceful protest turned violent. Two officers were hit in the leg, one in the foot and one in the arm, St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department Commissioner Col. John W. Hayden said at a news conference.

Officers in Las Vegas and New York had also been critically wounded and injured during ongoing civil unrest, officials said.

Read the full story here.

'What is this, a banana republic?': Pelosi unloads on Trump over gassing of protesters outside White House

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., expressed dismay Wednesday at what happened outside the White House on Monday evening when security forces used tear gas and flash bangs against a crowd of peaceful demonstrators to clear the area for the president.

In an interview on MSNBC’s “Morning Joe,” Pelosi said that her daughter Alexandra, a filmmaker and journalist, was at the scene that night and called her mom to tell her about what she had witnessed.

“She said, 'Mom, you wouldn't even believe it. These people were demonstrating peacefully. And all of a sudden, this barrage of security came through using clubs to beat people and these explosive scat little bullets that explode into stuff that burns your eyes,’” the speaker said.

“What is this, a banana republic?” Pelosi added.

See what else Pelosi said.