June 3 coverage of nationwide unrest and ongoing protests

George Floyd's death has sparked protests across the country.
Image: US-POLITICS-RACE-UNREST
Protesters hold up their hands during a demonstration outside the White House on June 3, 2020.Eric Baradat / AFP - Getty Images

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This live coverage has now ended. Continue reading June 4 coverage of George Floyd's death and the nationwide protests.

As protesters nationwide continued to hit the streets Wednesday, three more former Minneapolis police officers were charged in the death of George Floyd.

The three former officers, Tou Thao, Thomas Lane and J. Alexander Kueng, were charged with aiding and abetting murder, according to criminal complaints filed by the state of Minnesota. The murder charge against the fourth, Derek Chauvin, was also elevated to second-degree, from third-degree.

Curfews and arrests have done little to deter determined protesters in cities like New York, Los Angeles and Washington. Overall, however, demonstrations on Tuesday night and Wednesday have passed more peacefully than those held in previous days.

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Houston's police chief wins national praise — but faces local anger over shootings

Houston Police Chief Art Acevedo talks to protesters at a march in downtown Houston on June 2, 2020.Mike Hixenbaugh / NBC News

HOUSTON — As protesters clash with riot squads in cities across the country, Houston Police Chief Art Acevedo has drawn national praise for his willingness to march with activists and call for officers to be held accountable when they kill without justification.

But on Tuesday, some protesters in Houston confronted Acevedo over his record on police violence. They wanted to know why his department had refused to release body camera footage from six recent deadly police shootings in Houston. Some in the crowd shouted insults, calling Acevedo a “f------ liar” and a “hypocrite.” 

The tense moment highlighted a growing frustration simmering among activists in Houston who have accused Acevedo of striking a conciliatory tone during national media interviews, but then failing to back up his words with reforms in his own department. 

Read the full story here. 

D.C. National Guard opens investigation after helicopters flown low over protesters

The D.C. National Guard has opened an investigation after military helicopters were flown low over protesters on Monday evening, the agency announced Wednesday

A video of the maneuver, which has gone viral on Twitter and garnered over 1.8 million views, shows a helicopter flying lower than building height, kicking up debris and knocking branches off trees.

"I hold all members of the District of Columbia National Guard to the highest of standards,” Commanding General Major General William J. Walker said in a statement. “We live and work in the District, and we are dedicated to the service of our nation.”

Specifically, Walker said that the agency is investigating the use of medical evacuation helicopters as part of the Joint Task Force DC operation. The D.C. National Guard was mobilized earlier in the week to assist in the response to protests that have gripped the nation over the death of George Floyd.

Former President Carter: ‘Silence can be as deadly as violence’

Former President Jimmy Carter issued a statement Wednesday about the nationwide protests sparked by the killing of George Floyd in police custody, calling for people of privilege and power to stand up against racism.

"Since leaving the White House in 1981, Rosalynn and I have strived to advance human rights in countries around the world. In this quest, we have seen that silence can be as deadly as violence," Carter said in the statement.

“People of power, privilege, and moral conscience must stand up and say 'no more' to a racially discriminatory police and justice system, immoral economic disparities between whites and blacks, and government actions that undermine our unified democracy,” he added. “We need a government as good as its people, and we are better than this.”

Carter was quick to condemn violence — "But violence, whether spontaneous or consciously incited, is not a solution," the former president said  — but also pointed to discriminatory policing as a key issue. He also acknowledged “with sorrow and disappointment” that he was repeating the same calls for an end to discrimination that he’d made nearly 50 years ago when he was inaugurated governor of Georgia.

The former president won strong support from black voters during his time in politics, but came under fire during his first presidential bid for saying the federal government shouldn’t try to change the “ethnic purity” of neighborhoods by putting public housing in middle-class parts of the cities. Afterward, Carter apologized profusely: "I would sooner withdraw from the race then use racist appeals to win it," he said.

'Not being fully free': The toll of everyday racism on black Americans

In the parlance of the internet, the past week has been a year. So much has happened to shock those optimistic about the state of racial equity and affirm those always in tune with the persistence of racism in American life that the strain of the last 10 days has been extraordinary.

But black Americans are exhausted. They are grieving. They are angry. They have, in many cases, grown tired of being forced to make the case for their citizenship, their humanity, their very survival — again and again over the course of generations.

Read the full story here.

Police killing of 'BBQ Man' Dave McAtee renews a familiar anguish in Louisville

Louisville, Kentucky, a city already grappling with the police shooting death of Breonna Taylor nearly three months ago, faced renewed anguish this week with another police shooting that killed beloved business owner David McAtee.

McAtee was in a parking lot next to his barbecue stand, YaYa's Barbecue, early Monday when Louisville police officers and the National Guard went to break up a crowd in violation of a recently mandated curfew.

The crowd that the police and National Guard was trying to disperse wasn’t part of protests, according to NBC Louisville affiliate WAVE, and people often congregate in the parking lot of McAtee’s restaurant to eat and play music.

His mother said he would give out free meals to community members, including officers of the same police department that fired shots at him.

Read the full story here.

Books about race dominate Amazon's best sellers list

The majority of the books at the top of Amazon's best sellers list on Wednesday were about race and racial inequality, with "White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism" in the top slot.

Besides author Robin DiAngelo's 2018 exploration of the difficulties of promoting thoughtful racial dialogue, other top-selling books included "So You Want to Talk About Race," "The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America" and the "Sesame Street" children's classic "We're Different, We're the Same."

Amazon's list shows the top 100 best-selling books on its website and is updated hourly. Books about race dominated the top 20 spots and were sprinkled among the rest of the list among novels, self-help books and educational workbooks for children.

3 more Minneapolis officers charged in George Floyd death, Derek Chauvin charges elevated

Three more former Minneapolis police officers were charged on Wednesday in the deadly arrest of George Floyd, five days after charges were brought against a fourth officer who was seen in a video kneeling on Floyd’s neck.

Former officers Tou Thao, Thomas Lane and J. Alexander Kueng are facing charges of aiding and abetting murder, according to criminal complaints filed on Wednesday. The murder charge against another former officer, Derek Chauvin, were also elevated to second-degree murder.

Chauvin, the officer who place knee on Floyd’s neck for about eight minutes while detaining him on May 25, was initially charged Friday with third-degree murder and manslaughter by the Hennepin County prosecutor.

All four officers were terminated from their positions with the department on May 26, after a video showing the detainment went viral.

Read the full story here.