June 5 coverage of nationwide unrest and ongoing protests

George Floyd's death has sparked protests across the country. Here are the latest updates.
Image: Protesters lay in the middle of the intersection of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd. and Second Avenue in Memphis Thursday, June 4, 2020
Protesters lay in the middle of the intersection of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd. and Second Avenue in Memphis Thursday, June 4, 2020 for the protests over the death of George Floyd. Floyd died after being restrained by Minneapolis police officers on May 25.Patrick Lantrip / AP

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This live coverage has now ended. Continue reading June 6 coverage of George Floyd's death and the nationwide protests.

Protesters hit the streets in cities across the U.S. for a 10th night in a row just hours after George Floyd’s family condemned the “pandemic of racism and discrimination” at a memorial service.

In Washington D.C., where workers walled off more of the White House complex to keep demonstrators at bay, Metropolitan Police Chief Peter Newsham said the department was preparing for big numbers of “peaceful demonstrators coming to exercise their First Amendment rights” on Saturday.

And in Buffalo, two police officers were suspended without pay after a video showed authorities knocking down a 75-year-old man during a protest, Mayor Byron Brown said.

Download the NBC News app for the latest updates.

D.C. Mayor Bowser has 'Black Lives Matter' painted on street leading to White House

WASHINGTON — District of Columbia Mayor Muriel Bowser on Friday had "Black Lives Matter" painted on the street that leads to the White House where protesters have been demonstrating following George Floyd’s death in police custody.

"There was a dispute this week about whose street this is," John Falcicchio, chief of staff for Bowser, a Democrat, said in a tweet. "Mayor Bowser wanted to make it abundantly clear that this is DC's street and to honor demonstrators who (were) peacefully protesting on Monday evening."

People were seen painting the words "Black Lives Matter" on Friday morning in large block letters in yellow across 16th street, which leads to Lafayette Square and the White House.

The official D.C. chapter of the Black Lives Matter Global Network, however, suggested in a tweet that this move was merely an empty gesture by Bowser.

Read the full story here.

'No child should live through that': Viral protestor Raymon Curry on growing up black

NYC Mayor addresses detainment of essential worker after curfew

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio reiterated Friday that essential workers are exempt from the city's 8 p.m. curfew after a food delivery worker was detained by officers on Thursday night. 

The 8 p.m. curfew began Tuesday and will remain in effect until Sunday. 

A delivery worker on Thursday was cuffed, but not arrested, by officers near Central Park West, according to NBC New York. A journalist who was standing in front of her home was "roughed up" by police the day before, NBC New York reported

De Blasio said it needs to be "abundantly clear" to both the NYPD and essential workers that people "doing their job are exempted from curfew." 

As far as "news media out there doing their job, reporting, looking at the truth," de Blasio said. "Their right to do their job must be protected at all times."

The curfew will remain in effect until Monday morning as originally planned, he said. 

Washington mayor calls for federal law enforcement and military to leave

‘A giant mistake’: Police jeopardized more than protesters’ civil rights with crackdowns

Police advance on demonstrators last Saturday in Minneapolis.Scott Olson / Getty Images

The aggressive police response to demonstrations over George Floyd's death shows that departments have not learned the lessons of earlier protests in Baltimore over the death of Freddie Gray and in Ferguson, Missouri, over the death of Michael Brown, experts said.

The way police in many cities have responded to the recent protests — including clashes in which officers may have violated protesters' civil rights — threatens to jeopardize the limited progress on reforms made over the past several years. 

“I don’t think anyone would agree that police have emerged better off than they were a few days ago,” said Edward Maguire, an Arizona State University criminologist who researches police response to protests. He has seen images of officers beating up protesters and firing tear gas and rubber bullets on crowds in ways that may have made things worse, he said. “They have actively diminished their image over the past few days and it’s a giant mistake for them to have responded in that way.”

Read the full story here. 

Paris police ban rallies at the U.S. Embassy over coronavirus concerns

The Paris police have banned two rallies meant to take place Saturday outside the U.S. Embassy, citing restrictions on large gatherings in place to stop the coronavirus pandemic.

Earlier in the week, the Defense League for Black Africans in France had scheduled a demonstration to denounce racism and in solidarity with protesters in the U.S.

A June 2 demonstration against police violence and racism was also banned by police, but 20,000 people attended to protest near the Palais de Justice in central Paris.

People in Paris, France run from tear gas as they attend a banned demonstration on Tuesday held in memory of Adama Traore, a black Frenchman who died in a 2016 police operation, which some have linked to the death of George Floyd in the U.S.GONZALO FUENTES / Reuters

Mobile, Alabama, removes Confederate statue without warning

The city of Mobile, Alabama, removed a Confederate statue early Friday, without making any public announcements about it beforehand.

The bronze figure of Adm. Raphael Semmes had become a flashpoint for protest in the city. AL.com reported that it was removed from its pedestal after being vandalized this week and before demonstrations announced for Sunday calling for it to be taken down.

The removal of the 120-year-old figure follows days of protests in Alabama and across the nation over killings by police of African Americans. Some other Confederate symbols are coming down around the South. The city of Birmingham removed a towering obelisk after another statue was toppled by protesters. Virginia's governor has decided to remove a huge statue of Gen. Robert E. Lee in Richmond, Virginia, after city authorities said they'll remove other Confederate monuments from Monument Avenue.

Dallas implements ‘duty to intervene’ policy after George Floyd’s death

The Dallas Police Department implemented a new “duty to intervene” order in a reaction to watching co-workers of a Minneapolis police officer either assist or stand by as George Floyd suffocated to death while the officer applied pressure with his knee on Floyd’s neck for nearly nine minutes.

“It shall be the duty of every employee present at any scene where physical force is being applied to either stop, or attempt to stop, another employee when force is being inappropriately applied or is no longer required,” the new general order says, according to a news release obtained by NBC affiliate KXAS on Thursday evening. 

The order was developed to create a culture where what happened to Floyd does not happen again, the statement said. It came after protesters gathered outside the Dallas Police Association building on Thursday to ensure police accountability, according to NBC Dallas-Fort Worth.