June 7 coverage of nationwide unrest and ongoing protests

Here are the latest updates on protests across the country about George Floyd's death.
Image: A protester takes a knee during a demonstration in Holyrood Park, near Edinburgh, Scotland, on June 7, 2020.
A protester takes a knee during a demonstration in Holyrood Park, near Edinburgh, Scotland, on June 7, 2020.Jeff J Mitchell / Getty Images

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This live coverage has now ended. Continue reading June 8 coverage of George Floyd's death and the nationwide protests.

As the national anger over the death of George Floyd showed little sign of abating, from coast to coast demonstrators marched in cities across the country.

Thousands gathered in Washington D.C. to protest both Floyd's death and President Donald Trump's use of military personnel in response to largely peaceful demonstrations. Marchers also filed across the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco and the Brooklyn Bridge in New York, while others walked the boulevards of Hollywood and a Nashville, Tennessee.

Meanwhile, Floyd's family members gathered for a song- and prayer-filled private memorial service in North Carolina on Saturday after an earlier public viewing of his body drew long lines of mourners from around the country.

Elsewhere, British anti-racism protesters briefly clashed with mounted police as thousands gathered in central London, while demonstrations also took place in, Paris, Berlin, Sydney, Tokyo and a number of other cities around the world.

Download the NBC News app for the latest updates.

Philadelphia Inquirer executive editor resigns after publishing controversial headline

Philadelphia Inquirer executive editor Stan Wischnowski announced his resignation Saturday, just days after some 40 journalists called out "sick and tired" from work following a controversial headline published in the newspaper. 

On Tuesday, the Inquirer ran a story titled "Buildings Matter, Too," which looked at the destruction of businesses across the city as some protests over the death of George Floyd turned violent. 

The headline drew immediate backlash from dozens of reporters and countless readers, who called it tone deaf at best and insulting at worst. The Inquirer issued an apology, saying the headline was "offensive, inappropriate and we should not have printed it."

"We deeply regret that we did," the statement read in part. "We also know that an apology on its own is not sufficient."

Wischnowski worked at the Inquirer for 20 years, according to the newspaper.

'White Coats for Black Lives': Medical workers on virus frontlines join protesters

Medical workers on the frontlines of the coronavirus pandemic march down 16th towards the White House on Saturday, June 6, in a show of support for those protesting George Floyd's death.Lauren Egan / NBC News