May 30 coverage of nationwide unrest and ongoing protests

Here are the latest updates from across the country.
Police advance on demonstrators Saturday in Minneapolis.
Police advance on demonstrators Saturday in Minneapolis.Scott Olson / Getty Images

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This live coverage has now ended. Continue reading May 31 coverage of George Floyd's death and the nationwide protests.

Clashes between police and protesters continued to erupt across the country Saturday as thousands descended on the streets, pleading for justice in the wake of George Floyd's death this week in Minneapolis.

  • Curfews have been put in place in many cities including Minneapolis, Chicago, Seattle, Portland, Denver, Atlanta, Los Angeles, Cleveland, Columbus, Pittsburgh, Philadelphia, Milwaukee, Rochester and Miami Dade County.
  • In Philadelphia, police cars and a Starbucks were set on fire, as protesters tried to topple a statue of former Mayor Frank Rizzo.
  • Colorado, California, Georgia, Kentucky, Minnesota, Missouri, Ohio, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Washington, and Wisconsin have all activated their state national guards to maintain order, assist police, and stop violence, governors and state officials say.

President Donald Trump also announced Saturday that the military was "ready, willing and able" to deploy in case unrest continued.

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Minnesota officials blame out-of-state protesters for violence

Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz said Saturday that he would fully mobilize the Minnesota National Guard for the first time since World War II to bring an end to the "wonton destruction" protests that he blamed on protesters from outside the state.

The state had pulled together 700 troops on Friday for the protests sparked by the death of George Floyd in police custody. But it was not enough, Walz said. By noon on Saturday, Walz said that 2,500 guardsman would be activated, noting that it was "nothing short of a blessing" that no one had yet been killed in the violence.

State officials said that around 80 percent of those arrested in the Twin Cities on Friday had come from outside Minnesota.

While "there's a group of folks that are sad and mourning" about Floyd, Mayor Melvin Carter said, "there seems to be another group that are using Mr. Floyd's death as a cover to create havoc."

Read the full story here.

Black men in Minneapolis outraged over Floyd killing, distrustful of judicial system

Since Samar Moseley moved back to Minneapolis from upstate New York in 2015, the police-involved killings of black men have placed the city on the cusp of anarchy.

But today feels different, Moseley said.

“This has the potential to be worse than Ferguson” he said, referring to the town in Missouri that erupted in riots in 2014 after an unarmed black teenager, Michael Brown, was fatally shot by a white police officer. “It’s happened too many times here.”

Protesters—black and white—have stormed the streets in Minneapolis and other cities across the country in the nights since the death of George Floyd in police custody on Monday. Floyd, who was black, died after a white police officer pinned him to the ground with his knee for more than eight minutes during an arrest.

That officer, Derek Chauvin, was arrested on Friday and charged with third-degree murder and manslaughter.

For many, that was a victory. But many others, it was far less than that. Three other officers involved in the encounter, two who on video appear to be holding Floyd down and another who stood by, have not been charged, and that does not sit well with a large faction of a distraught and angry public.

Read the full story here.

Portland mayor places curfew following violence; at least 13 arrested

Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler placed a citywide curfew starting at 8 p.m. Saturday after peaceful events gave way to violence on Friday night, resulting in numerous destroyed businesses and at least 13 arrests.

Portland Police said they were aware of two planned events in memory of George Floyd. Some attendees left the area and several hundred marched toward downtown Portland, police said, adding that "some protesters in the march vandalized business with graffiti for about twenty blocks. A bank sustained broken windows."

A shooting was then reported at around 9:50 p.m. Friday in relation to the protests. Police said a vehicle was within a large group of protesters when "one of the protesters shot at the occupants of the vehicle, injuring the passenger."

Protesters spraypainted buildings, broke windows and made an unlawful entry into a building, starting a fire inside of it, police said. Firefighters also put off multiple other fires in the city, including "a large dumpster, trash cans, vehicles and a large pile of pallets," according to police.

Police in riot gear were deployed after 11 p.m. and the protesters were dispersed from certain areas in downtown Portland. Two officers sustained injuries, police said.

At least 200 NYC protesters arrested

At least 200 people were arrested Friday in New York City as thousands gathered to protest the death of George Floyd.

Among those arrested were two women after one of them threw a Molotov cocktail at a police van. The New York City Police Department said the woman who threw it faces attempted murder charges. 

Police said they recovered bricks, brass knuckles and firearms from other protesters who were taken into custody. 

"It's tough to practice de-escalation when you have a brick being thrown at your head," NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea said, adding that a number of officers were sent to the emergency room after suffering injuries including having their teeth knocked out. 

Federal Protective Service officer killed, another injured in Oakland shooting amid George Floyd protests

One security officer with the Federal Protective Service was killed, and another injured after shots rang out amid protests in Oakland amid protests over the death of George Floyd on Friday, authorities said.

"An individual inside the vehicle began firing gunshots at contract security officers for the Federal Protective Service of the Department of Homeland Security," FBI San Francisco said in a statement.

The FBI is continuing to investigate the shooting, which occurred at 9:45 p.m. at the Ronald V. Dellums Federal Building.

Read the full story here.

Transport Workers Union urges members not to drive arrested NYC protesters

The Transport Workers Union in New York City told some of its members not to help the New York City Police Department transport arrested protesters in city buses.

The initially peaceful protests turned violent late at night, particularly in Brooklyn, where social media videos surfaced showing police vehicles burning and officers physically clashing with protesters.

At least 200 people were arrested as protesters took to the streets to demonstrate against police brutality in the wake of George Floyd's death in Minneapolis, NBC affiliate WNBC reported.

New York City Police said the arrests included two women who allegedly threw a Molotov cocktail at a police van. Several cops are believed to have been injured. Two state legislators were pepper-sprayed and one handcuffed, WNBC reported.

Social media posts then started showing police officers commandeering a public transportation bus, urging the bus operator to transport arrested protesters. The driver resisted. The posts prompted the Transport Workers Union to tweet that its members saying they should refuse to drive the arrested.

"TWU Local 100 Bus Operators do not work for the NYPD. We transport the working families of NYC , all TWU Operators should refuse to transport arrested protestors," the union tweeted.

Killer Mike makes impassioned plea against systemic racism

Rapper Killer Mike gave an impassioned address from his hometown Atlanta, where mass protests broke out against the police killing of George Floyd.

In a televised speech alongside the Mayor of Atlanta, Keisha Lance Bottoms, Killer Mike accused the police of "assassinating" Floyd "like an animal." The musician and activist also called for an end to looting, urging citizens not to burn down their own homes.

""I'm mad as hell ... I’m tired of seeing black men die," he said in the clip that has gone viral, having been shared online by many, including celebrities Lebron James and Immortal Technique. 

 

Martin Luther King III echoes father's words during George Floyd protests

Human rights advocate Martin Luther King III, the eldest son of civil rights leaders Martin Luther King Jr. and Coretta Scott King, took to Twitter to echo his father words, telling his followers: "We shall overcome."

"George Floyd should still be alive right now. But he was lynched. We will not stay quiet. No justice, no peace," King wrote online.