Ms. Nevada has been stripped of her crown. She says it's because she supports Trump.

Katie Williams insists she's a victim of censorship, while organizers said she violated social media rules.
Image: Miss Nevada State Katie Williams waves during a parade in Tonopah on May 25, 2019.
Ms. Nevada State Katie Williams waves during a parade in Tonopah on May 25, 2019.Bridget Bennett / AFP - Getty Images file

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By David K. Li and Jareen Imam

Katie Williams no longer wears the crown of Ms. Nevada.

The 29-year-old Las Vegas woman claims she's a victim of censorship, and being unfairly targeted over her support for President Donald Trump.

But pageant organizers insist it's Williams' failure to separate political activism from her pageant persona — not her specific support of Trump — that cost her the Silver State sash.

Katie Williams was stripped of her title as Ms. Nevada and won't be able to compete in the national pageant. A supporter of President Donald Trump, she claims to be a victim of political censorship.Carlos Levya

So when more than three dozen women vie for the crown of Ms. America at The Queen Mary in Long Beach, California, this Saturday, Williams will not be on board. Nevada will not be represented at the pageant, which has run since 1997.

"I just don't understand how you can censor someone with conservative values when I'm not even really saying anything that's bad," Williams said in a video Facebook posting over the weekend, announcing that she had been booted from the competition.

Williams, who won the Ms. Nevada 2019 crown this past April, declined further comment to NBC News on Wednesday, standing by her online comments. She's a fitness instructor and was deployed with the Army National Guard to Afghanistan in 2008-09, according to her spokesman.

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A statement on Ms. America's website claimed that Williams was told to keep her political commentary limited to personal social media pages. And if she wanted to talk politics, she should create a separate one for pageant-related postings.

"Katie Williams is distorting the facts," according to a Ms. America statement. "ALL the pageant asked of Ms. Williams, in writing, is to keep separate social media accounts."

The pageant added: "She has her Personal Facebook page to voice her political views. However, the Ms. Nevada Facebook Page should be devoid of political content."

Williams insists that's exactly what she did, claiming she followed pageant instructions to create a second Facebook account for Ms. Nevada material that was apart from her personal one.

A pageant official "continued to screen shot my page, my personal page, and email me about how she was disappointed and she didn't agree with it and that I needed to speak with her on the phone," Williams said in her Facebook posting.

But Ms. America CEO Susan Jeske said while Williams did create a second pageant-related Facebook account, the contestant's Trump-filled page still had plenty of images and mentions of the Ms. America competition

"If you're putting pageant stuff on your personal page, then that's a pageant page. You're combing it," Jeske, winner of the first Ms. America pageant in 1997, told NBC News on Wednesday.

On Williams personal Facebook page, the now-former contestant wears a "Trump 2020" baseball cap in her profile picture. Williams' top post on Wednesday afternoon was a picture of her smiling while wearing the Ms. Nevada sash and crown.

Throughout that personal page, Williams regularly sticks up for the president, embracing many of his favorite talking points, such as threats of socialism and Antifa.

She called confrontational, anti-fascist protesters a "terrorist organization."

Williams declared that "birth control isn't a right."

She also believes that "Democratic Socialists" and feminists are "ruining" America.

In her Facebook video statement, Williams said other contestants have voiced political views and were not punished like she was.

"I feel like if I had more liberal views, less conservative views, that this wouldn't be an issue," Williams said.