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Video shows lightning strike boat carrying 7 in Florida

The Coast Guard said that because the boat was equipped with an emergency position-indicating radio beacon, crews were able to locate it quickly. But it still took two hours to get to the disabled boat.

A lightning strike on a boat carrying seven people 100 miles off Florida was caught on video Saturday.

A Coast Guard MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter air crew flew two hours to rescue the two men and five women, one of whom was pregnant, from the boat off Clearwater, according to the Coast Guard and those who were on the vessel.

The group, which was participating in a fishing tournament, was returned "to the air station where family greeted them," the Coast Guard said.

Glenn Rumer, a co-captain of the vessel, said the group was headed into shore when an unexpected storm swept in.

"There was only one way to go. And that was kind of through the storm," Rumer told NBC's “TODAY” show. "I’ve been through storms. I’ve had lightning around me in the past, but nothing like this."

Sherrie Kelley, his sister, said, “Every second there was lightning.”

The intense lightning strike was caught on video, appearing to come very close to some of the passengers.

No one was injured. Rumer said the outrigger was set on fire and exploded into splinters.

"The motors, the electrical, everything went out. We were completely dead in the water," he said.

Kelley said she "went into mom mode" and got everyone below deck.

The Coast Guard said that because the boat was equipped with an emergency position-indicating radio beacon, crews were able to locate it quickly. But it still took two hours to get to the disabled boat.

Kelley and Rumer said everyone got emotional when they were finally rescued. Rumer called the rescue crew "angels of the water."

"Mother Nature had her way with us," Kelley concluded with a laugh.

Rumer said that "we had God’s backing, and he blessed us, and everybody is safe at home and nobody hurt."

Lightning strikes kill more people Florida than in any other state, according to the National Weather Service.

"Florida’s unique location, surrounded by warm water, provides the necessary ingredients for thunderstorms to form," according to the NWS.

Typically, July is the most dangerous month for lightning strikes in the state.

CORRECTION (June 27, 2022, 3:45 p.m. ET): A previous version of this article misstated the number of men and women on the boat. There were two men and five women, not five men and two women.