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Mark Zuckerberg not your security daddy

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg speaks at Facebook headquarters in Palo Alto, Calif., Thursday, April 7, 2011. Seeking to transform the energy efficiency of global data centers, Facebook today launched the Open Compute Project, an initiative to share the custom-engineered technology in its first dedicated data center in Prineville, Oregon. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg speaks at Facebook headquarters in Palo Alto, Calif., Thursday, April 7, 2011. Seeking to transform the energy efficiency of global data centers, Facebook today launched the Open Compute Project, an initiative to share the custom-engineered technology in its first dedicated data center in Prineville, Oregon. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)AP

"Is Mark Zuckerberg responsible for keeping our personal information safe on Facebook?" That's one of the questions Internet security firm Webroot posed to 4,000 users of social networks.

The resounding answer: No. Seventy-three percent said they take "personal responsibility for the security of their own information." But 13 percent said the Zuck is responsible for watching over their info; another 10 percent believe that security companies are the ones tasked with that.

More of us have decided in recent years to take responsibility for adjusting and monitoring our privacy and security settings on sites like Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, MySpace and now, Google+.

In 2009, 37 percent of U.S. "social networkers" said they had "never viewed or changed their privacy settings;" in 2011, only 8 percent said that was the case. Among the more closely adjusted privacy settings by social networkers, Webroot said: restricting what people can see about them after finding them through a search; restricting who (besides their friends) can find them through a search; and blocking their profile from being seen through public searches.

While more of us are being more responsible about social networks, we're also getting more dependent on them, the company said in its survey findings, released Tuesday:

  • 54 percent of respondents feel some level of addiction to their social network of choice.
  • 46 percent of respondents visit their favorite social network several times a day or constantly.
  • 18 percent visit once a day.
  • 42 percent of those who visit their socials several times a day or constantly are accessing them from mobile devices.

Those between the ages of 18 and 34 are the "most addicted users," but also the "most responsible" when they use social networking on smartphones:

  • 54 percent of them access their social network of choice several times a day or constantly from their smartphone or tablet.
  • 54 percent who have smartphones or tablets have security installed, with 'Lost/stolen device locator app' and 'free mobile/tablet security app' most common.
  • "Older generations are at greater risk for security issues on their smartphones/tablets; nearly 50 percent of those 35 and older don't have any security installed."

And, another indication that Facebook CEO Zuckerberg is not blamed for security woes; He remains the most popular person on Google+ with more than 459,000 followers since it launched in late June.

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