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Obama's transgender ex-nanny: He laughed at my lipstick

In this Friday, Jan. 27, 2012 photo, Evie, also known as Turdi, the former nanny of U.S. President Barack Obama, stands at the doorway of her room at a boarding house in a slum in Jakarta, Indonesia. Evie, who was born a man but believes she is really a woman, has endured a lifetime of taunts and beatings because of her identity. Nobody knows how many transgenders live in the sprawling archipelagic nation of 240 million, but activists estimate 7 million. However, societal disdain still runs deep - when transgenders act in TV comedies, they are invariably the brunt of the joke. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)
In this Friday, Jan. 27, 2012 photo, Evie, also known as Turdi, the former nanny of U.S. President Barack Obama, stands at the doorway of her room at a boarding house in a slum in Jakarta, Indonesia. Evie, who was born a man but believes she is really a woman, has endured a lifetime of taunts and beatings because of her identity. Nobody knows how many transgenders live in the sprawling archipelagic nation of 240 million, but activists estimate 7 million. However, societal disdain still runs deep - when transgenders act in TV comedies, they are invariably the brunt of the joke. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)Dita Alangkara / AP

The Associated Press today published an exclusive interview with the transgender former nanny who looked after Barack Obama during his childhood in Indonesia. Evie, who was born a man but believes she is a woman, has fond memories of the young future President, who was known back then as "Barry":

Evie was 8-year-old Barry's caretaker, playing with him and bringing him to and from school. Neighbors recalled that they often saw Evie leave the house in the evening fully made up and dressed in drag. But she says it's doubtful Barry ever knew. "He was so young," says Evie. "And I never let him see me wearing women's clothes. But he did see me trying on his mother's lipstick, sometimes. That used to really crack him up."

Evie, who has faced a lifetime of taunts and beatings because of her identity, says that she has now decided it's better to hide her true feelings. Read the full story.

In this Friday, Jan. 27, 2012 photo, Evie, also known as Turdi, the former nanny of U.S. President Barack Obama, shows a picture of herself, left, dressed as a woman with an unidentified friend in a pageant, in Jakarta, Indonesia. Evie, who was born a man but believes she is really a woman, has endured a lifetime of taunts and beatings because of her identity. Nobody knows how many transgenders live in the sprawling archipelagic nation of 240 million, but activists estimate 7 million. However, societal disdain still runs deep - when transgenders act in TV comedies, they are invariably the brunt of the joke. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)
In this Friday, Jan. 27, 2012 photo, Evie, also known as Turdi, the former nanny of U.S. President Barack Obama, shows a picture of herself, left, dressed as a woman with an unidentified friend in a pageant, in Jakarta, Indonesia. Evie, who was born a man but believes she is really a woman, has endured a lifetime of taunts and beatings because of her identity. Nobody knows how many transgenders live in the sprawling archipelagic nation of 240 million, but activists estimate 7 million. However, societal disdain still runs deep - when transgenders act in TV comedies, they are invariably the brunt of the joke. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)Dita Alangkara / AP