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'Reaction with force' needed if Syria chemical attack verified, France says

The international community must respond with “a reaction with force” if allegations that the Syrian government carried out a deadly chemical attack were confirmed, France said Wednesday.Following the White House’s lead, French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius urged Syrian President Bashar Assad to allow an immediate and transparent U.N. investigation of the incident, which some activists and

The international community must respond with “a reaction with force” if allegations that the Syrian government carried out a deadly chemical attack were confirmed, France said Wednesday.

Following the White House’s lead, French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius urged Syrian President Bashar Assad to allow an immediate and transparent U.N. investigation of the incident, which some activists and rebel fighters claim killed 1,200 people. 

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He told French broadcaster BFMTV that “there would have to be a reaction with force from the international community" if Assad force's gassed civilians.

However, Fabius added: "But there is no question of sending troops on the ground."

He said that if the United Nations Security Council could not make a decision, one would have to be taken “in other ways,” although he did not elaborate on what those might be.   

Turkish Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoglu also said Thursday that "all red lines" had been crossed in Syria and criticized international inaction. 

"All red lines have been crossed but still the U.N. Security Council has not even been able to take a decision. This is a responsibility for the sides who still set these red lines and for all of us," Davutoglu told reporters in Berlin.  

Despite condemnation from the international community, Syrian activists said Thursday that Assad’s forces were pressing ahead with their assault on the rebel-held suburbs of eastern Damascus where the chemical attack is alleged to have taken place.

The Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said it had no word on casualties in Thursday's bombing of Ghouta.

The Syrian government denied as "absolutely baseless" allegations it used chemical-tipped weapons in artillery barrages, after videos apparently showing the graphic and disturbing aftermath of the alleged attacks were posted to social media.

The clips, that showed children choking and vomiting, while adults writhed in agony could not be independently verified.

Syrian state television said the videos were a deliberate attempt to distract United Nations chemical weapons experts who arrived in the country on Monday.

White House spokesman Josh Earnest said Wednesday that the United States does not have independent confirmation that chemical weapons were used.  

“We are hopeful that the Assad regime will follow through on what they have claimed previously, that they are interested in a credible investigation that gets to the bottom of reports that chemical weapons have been used,” Earnest said. 

Reuters and the Associated Press contributed to this report.

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