U.K.'s Princess Beatrice borrowed Queen Elizabeth II's dress and tiara for wedding, palace says

The ivory taffeta gown by Norman Hartnell and a tiara were worn by the queen on her own wedding day in 1947.
Britain's Princess Beatrice and her husband Edoardo Mapelli Mozzi after their wedding on Friday.
Britain's Princess Beatrice and her husband Edoardo Mapelli Mozzi after their wedding on Friday.AP

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By Isobel van Hagen

LONDON — Britain's Princess Beatrice donned a vintage dress and diamond tiara which she borrowed from her grandmother Queen Elizabeth II, new pictures of her wedding on Friday show.

While the princess chose not have a public ceremony and opted for a private family event, the photographs of the function show Beatrice walked down the aisle in an a ivory taffeta gown by Norman Hartnell and a tiara that were worn by the queen on her own wedding day in 1947, Buckingham Palace said in a statement Saturday.

With little of the usual royal pomp and fanfare, Beatrice, who is ninth in line to the throne, married property tycoon Edoardo Mapelli Mozzi at Windsor Castle, in an exclusive ceremony that was scaled back due to Britain’s coronavirus restrictions.

Her 94-year-old grandmother and husband Prince Philip, 99, attended with only the parents and siblings of the bride and groom.

Beatrice is the eldest daughter of Britain's Prince Andrew and Sarah Ferguson, Duchess of York.

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Prince Andrew does not appear in either of the two wedding photos released by the palace.

The prince has stopped performing public royal duties amid demands by U.S. authorities to question him about his relationship with disgraced financier Jeffrey Epstein, who died in a New York jail in August 2019 while facing sex trafficking charges.

The couple had originally planned to marry in May, the palace said in a statement, but Britain's lockdown forced them to reschedule. Wedding ceremonies have been allowed in England since July 4 but with a limit of 30 guests.

The palace said guidelines to stop the spread of COVID-19 were followed at the small ceremony. Music was played but there were no hymns and no singing — not even during the U.K. national anthem, "God Save the Queen."

"Working within government guidelines, the service was in keeping with the unique circumstances while enabling them to celebrate their wedding with their closest family," the palace said.