Watch Hong Kong demonstrators pack airport, sing protest song from 'Les Misérables'

The tune has become a universal anthem of protesters, "Do you hear the people sing? Singing a song of angry men?"

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By David K. Li

Pro-democracy demonstrators in Hong Kong broke into Broadway song on Friday, filling the special administrative region's airport with musical protest.

The peaceful, highly-organized demonstrators serenaded travelers with "Do You Hear the People Sing?" one of the most recognizable and beloved hits from the musical "Les Misérables."

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The catchy tune has become a universal anthem of protesters, "Do you hear the people sing? Singing a song of angry men?"

Greeting travelers at the arrival hall at Hong Kong International Airport was "the most direct way" for protesters to tell visitors about their struggle to maintain freedom for Hong Kong residents.

"The world has been watching us in the past few weeks," said Jeremy Tam, a former pilot and lawmaker who helped organize Friday's protest. "We simply believe that the airport is the most direct way for all tourists to explain what is happening in Hong Kong."

Mass demonstrations have become nearly daily events in the former British colony since lawmakers first considered an extradition agreement with the People's Republic of China. Opponents of the bill feared that Hong Kong residents could be sent to the mainland on trumped-up charges and be swallowed up by the Beijing regime's legal system.

Even though the bill was pulled from consideration, protests have continued as people are demanding democratic reforms and the ouster Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam.

Hong Kong returned to China from the United Kingdom in 1997 under a "one country, two systems" agreement that is intended to protect personal freedoms until at least 2047.

Reuters contributed.