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Hadron collider scientists discover three subatomic particles never seen before

07:31

Beneath the Swiss Alps lives the world’s largest and most powerful particle accelerator and recently scientists found three new subatomic particles never seen before. NBC News’ Jacob Ward is joined by Yale University physics Professor Dr. Sarah Demers to discuss how this week’s discovery could help researchers learn how the universe was born and what the future looks like.