Ride the Galloping Horse of History

Winning campaigns choose to make the tough calls that put candidates on the right side of history.
Image: Civil rights leaders meeting with President John F. Kennedy in the Oval Office of the White House following the civil rights march on Washington D.C., Aug. 28, 1963.
Civil rights leaders meeting with President John F. Kennedy in the Oval Office of the White House following the civil rights march on Washington D.C., Aug. 28, 1963. Pictured are (left to right) Secretary of Labor Willard Wirtz, Congress of Racial Equality leader Floyd McKissick, National Catholic Conference for Interracial Justice leader Mathew Ahmann, National Urban League executive director Whitney Young, Southern Christian Leadership Conference leader Martin Luther King Jr., Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee chairman John Lewis, American Jewish Congress Rabbi Joachim Prinz, A. Philip Randolph, Reverend Eugene Carson Blake (partially visible), President John F. Kennedy, United Auto Workers president Walter Reuther, Vice President Lyndon Johnson, NAACP executive director Roy Wilkins.Library of Congress / Reuters

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When Jack Kennedy phoned Coretta Scott King to express concern over her husband’s arrest in 1960, it was a risky move in a tense civil rights era. It also helped propel him to victory against Richard Nixon. So, be like Kennedy and jump on that galloping horse of history as it flies by. You don’t get a second chance. Chris is joined in this episode by Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Jon Meacham and former Congresswoman Donna Edwards.

Read the transcript here.

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