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Nov. 12 highlights: The Biden-Harris transition continues

Biden was projected to win Arizona, according to NBC News, extending his lead in the Electoral College to 290-217.
Image: Donald Trump and Joe Biden on a background of red and blue ripples with white stars.
Chelsea Stahl / NBC News

The presidential transition continues its rocky course on Thursday with President Donald Trump still refusing to concede the election and President-elect Joe Biden putting forward more plans for his administration.

Trump met with several top aides on Wednesday to discuss a path forward as the vote count in several key states winds down. Biden, meanwhile, picked up another win in Arizona, NBC News projected, which brings his lead in the Electoral College to 290-217. There are only two states that have not yet been called: Georgia and North Carolina.

This live coverage has ended. Continue reading election news from Nov. 13, 2020.

Stories we're watching:

Trump may accept results but never concede he lost, aides say

Republicans who have broken with Trump to congratulate Biden on his win

More people who attended Trump's election night party test positive for Covid

Full presidential election results

Corey Lewandowski the latest member of Trump circle to test positive for Covid-19

Corey Lewandowski, who has been a part of President Trump campaign’s legal challenges, has tested positive for Covid-19, a source familiar with the diagnosis tells NBC News.

Lewandowski confirmed the diagnosis in text message to CNBC, saying, "I feel great."

Lewandowski is the latest person to test positive for the virus after attended last week's Election Night party at the White House. His diagnosis follows chief of staff Mark Meadows and Housing, Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson and several White House staffers.

Lewandowski was also in Philadelphia, in recent days, including at the news conference last Saturday at the Four Seasons Total Landscaping with Rudy Giuliani and Pam Bondi.

Read the story.

Schumer calls on Trump, GOP to stop their 'temper tantrum' over the election results

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi denounced President Donald Trump and Republicans on Thursday for sowing doubt in and refusing to accept the presidential election results.

“The election is not in doubt," Schumer said at joint news conference with Pelosi on Capitol Hill. "This is nothing more than a temper tantrum by Republicans, nothing more than a pathetic political performance for an audience of one: President Donald John Trump.”

Schumer said the results of the 2020 presidential election cannot be compared to the 2000 election, which came down to Florida and a difference of several hundred votes.

“Joe Biden's victory in the Electoral College has been secured by several states, where tens of thousands of votes separate the candidates," he said. "Joe Biden leads Wisconsin by 20,000, Pennsylvania ... 50,000, Michigan ... 146,000. That's the facts. Biden's won. Nothing Republicans or Trump can do will change that.”

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Republicans who have broken with Trump to congratulate Biden on his win

A small but growing group of prominent Republicans have broken with President Trump and the rest of their party in congratulating President-elect Joe Biden and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris on their projected election victory.

Trump has refused to concede the race, and the vast majority of Republicans in Congress and elsewhere have yet to acknowledge the Democrats' win. 

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine is the latest Republican to refer to Biden as the president-elect.

Read the full list of Republicans who have publicly acknowledged the former vice president is the winner of the election.

FIRST READ: The path to 270 is changing, fast

In 2004, George W. Bush won Colorado by more than 4 percentage points and Virginia by 8 points, while winning the presidency by capturing Ohio by some 100,000 votes.

Sixteen years later — and with still not all the vote in — President-elect Joe Biden won Colorado by more than 13 points and carried Virginia by 10 points, while outgoing President Donald Trump appears to have won Ohio by 8 points for a second-straight cycle.

It’s all a reminder that electoral maps aren’t forever.

With changing demographics, education levels and political coalitions, how our states break in presidential elections aren’t set in stone.

Get First Read.

Biden wants to scrap Betsy DeVos' rules on sexual assault in schools. It won't be easy.

Adam Maida for NBC News / Getty Images

The Biden administration will have limited options to scrap Title IX regulations implemented three months ago that control how schools deal with sexual assault cases.

The Trump administration's rules, which were opposed by anti-rape activists and K-12 and college administrators, gave more rights to students accused of assault and restricted how schools are allowed to investigate sexual misconduct allegations.

Proponents of the new rules, including Republicans and the civil liberties nonprofit Foundation for Individual Rights in Education, celebrated them as a balanced approach to the gender equity law Title IX. But Democrats and advocates for assault victims, including the National Women's Law Center, argued that the regulations would discourage students from reporting assaults.

Read the story. 

'Ohio has taken a different turn': Ohio no longer appears to be a swing state

Joe Biden speaks at a drive-in get out the vote event at Burke Lakefront Airport on Nov. 2, 2020 in Cleveland.Jim Watson / AFP - Getty Images

CINCINNATI — President-elect Joe Biden is the first person to win the presidency without carrying Ohio since 1960.

Biden's victory, and the matter in which he won, left many political pundits wondering what it means for the bellwether state moving forward.

"I think that Ohio really isn't a representative of the whole country the way that it once was," said Mark Caleb Smith, a professor of political science at Cedarville University in Ohio.

"Ohio now is a much more red state than it is a purple state," Smith said. "If you look at recent elections, statewide, presidential or gubernatorial, Republicans have done extremely well. I just think that means Ohio has taken a different turn. I think Ohio has shifted a little bit and it's no longer that middle part of the country — it's probably a little more on the right, traditional, conservative side."

Some national political experts take it a step further.

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U.S.-Saudi ties were especially close under Trump. Under Biden, that looks likely to change

President Donald Trump shakes hands with Saudi Arabia's Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman in the Oval Office of the White House in 2018.Mandel Ngan / AFP - Getty Images file

When President Donald Trump visited Saudi Arabia on his first official foreign visit in 2017, he was showered with pageantry and flanked by a herd of horsemen carrying Saudi and American flags.

The relationship between the two countries has remained cozy throughout his administration.

But as Joe Biden prepares to become the 46th president, it is improbable that he will make Riyadh a repeat port of call.

Biden has pledged to "reassess" the U.S. relationship with the oil-rich, deeply conservative kingdom, and Saudi Arabia is likely to have a less privileged and personal relationship with the Biden administration than it has had with the Trump team, some analysts say.

Read the story.

GOP Sen. Lankford: 'I will step in' if GSA doesn't certify election by Friday for Biden to receive intel briefings

Sen. James Lankford, R-Okla., said Wednesday that if the General Services Administration doesn't start allowing President-elect Joe Biden to receive intelligence briefings as the president-elect by Friday, he will step in. 

"There is no loss from him getting the briefings and to be able to do that. And if that's not occurring by Friday, I will step in as well and to be able to push them and say this needs to occur, so that regardless of the outcome of the election, whichever way that it goes, people can be ready for that actual task," Lankford said in an interview with Tulsa’s KRMG Radio. 

Lankford joined some of his other Republican colleagues, saying that the transition process should begin and the "GSA has to certify that election to start turning it around. The first day they can do that on the calendar is Friday."

"There's nothing wrong with Vice President Biden getting the briefings to be able to prepare himself and so that he can be ready," Lankford said.