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Highlights and analysis from Election Day 2020

Presidential election results as ballots are counted in key swing states for President Trump and Joe Biden. Get live coverage and electoral vote updates.
Watch NBC News special election coverage
Watch NBC News special election coverage

Election Day is over, with polls having closed across the country and officials processing both in-person and mail-in ballots.

As Tuesday bled into Wednesday, President Donald Trump and Joe Biden were running a tight race. Trump was projected to win some key battleground states such as Florida, Ohio and Texas, while Biden was projected to win New Hampshire and Minnesota. Meanwhile, election officials in three other key states, Pennsylvania, Michigan and Arizona, still have millions of ballots to count.

This live coverage has ended. Continue reading election news from November 4, 2020.

Read live updates below:

Trump to campaign staff: 'Winning is easy, losing is never easy'

Speaking to staffers at his campaign headquarters in Northern Virginia, Trump expressed confidence that he's doing well in certain battleground states and suggested that losing the election would not be easy for him. 

"I hear we're doing very well in Florida, we're doing very well in Arizona, we're doing incredibly well in Texas," Trump told his campaign staff at the Republican National Committee annex in Arlington, Va. "The lines have been amazing, and I think we're going to have a great night."

Trump said that he isn't thinking about a concession or an acceptance speech yet. 

"Hopefully, we'll be only doing one of those two and you know, winning is easy. Losing is never easy — not for me it's not," he said. 

Trump continued by bashing a Supreme Court decision that is allowing Pennsylvania to count mail-in ballots several days after Election Day. 

"I think we should know what happens on the night. Let people put their ballots in earlier,” he said. “You have to have numbers. You can't have these things delayed for many days and maybe weeks, you can't do that. The whole world is waiting. This country is waiting, the whole world is waiting."

"We should be entitled to know who won on Nov. 3," he added.

'Future voter' checks out her polling place in Brooklyn

Zora King shows her "future voter" sticker at Borough Hall on Election Day in Brooklyn, N.Y., on Tuesday.Caitlin Ochs / Reuters

Some Republicans feel protected by 6-3 Supreme Court, even if Biden wins

WASHINGTON — Republican voters fearing a potential Joe Biden presidency are taking some solace in the belief that a newly conservative Supreme Court with Justice Amy Coney Barrett will restrain Democratic ambitions.

Some of President Donald Trump’s supporters believe the new 6-3 majority of Republican appointees will be a bulwark against a Biden administration’s attempts to move the country in a more progressive direction.

“We have no fears because there’s a conservative Supreme Court now,” said Cynthia Manville of Buckeye, Arizona, who attended a Trump rally in Phoenix last Wednesday. “We feel if Democrats cast legislation that’s radical liberal, it wouldn’t stand the test of time.”

“God has a certain way of watching over this country,” said Manville, who attended with her husband, Steve, both of whom were wearing red “Make America Great Again” hats.

The conservative victory on the court eases one of the biggest sources of anxiety among Republican voters, which has tended to be a motivator to vote. In 2016, an open Supreme Court seat galvanized evangelicals behind Trump. In the run-up to 2020 Election Day, Trump sought to bring back that urgency by warning that Biden could "pack the court" and erase their gains.

Read more here.

Polling locations in Las Vegas experiencing technical difficulties

Several polling locations in Clark County, which includes Las Vegas, were experiencing technical difficulties Tuesday morning and have not yet opened, according to a tweet from the Nevada secretary of state's office. 

“If you are waiting in line, please be patient,” the tweet said. “The sites will open soon.” 

In Nevada, polls opened at 7 a.m. and close at 7 p.m. Those who are voting in person will be allowed to cast their votes as long as they are in line at a polling location by 7 p.m. All polling locations also double as ballot drop-off sites.

More than 1.1 million voters had cast their ballots by Monday morning in the battleground state, according to NBC News' count.

More prayers for Kamala Harris in India

Hindus pray for the success of Sen. Kamala Harris at a temple in Thulasendrapuram village, south of Chennai, India, on Tuesday.Aijaz Rahi / AP
A banner with Sen. Kamala Harris in Thulasendrapuram, the hometown of Harris' maternal grandfather who migrated from there decades ago.Aijaz Rahi / AP

Atlanta polling places see shorter lines

Voters line up early on Election Day in Atlanta.Brynn Anderson / AP

Voting seems to be running smoothly in Fulton County — Georgia's most populous, which includes Atlanta — with some reports indicating wait times of less than 30 minutes.

This is a stark departure from earlier this year, when the county experienced hourslong lines, ballot shortages and voting machine malfunctions during its June primary in what voting rights groups widely slammed as a "catastrophe."

Vote Watch: Michigan attorney general warns about robocalls targeting Flint residents with false voting information

Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel said Tuesday morning that her office received multiple reports from residents in Flint who said they received robocalls that pushed inaccurate voting information.

The robocalls allegedly told some residents that if lines were too long on Election Day, that voters could vote the following day, which is not true.   

"Obviously this is FALSE and an effort to suppress the vote. No long lines and today is the last day to vote. Don’t believe the lies! Have your voice heard! RT PLS," Nessel posted on her Twitter account, urging other social media users to retweet her post. 

Gov. Gretchen Whitmer also said that an unknown group was spreading misinformation through robocalls in an attempt to confuse Michigan voters.

“Let me be clear — if you plan to vote in-person, you must do so, or be in line to do so, by 8PM today,” she posted on Twitter.

A Department of Homeland Security official said Tuesday that robocalls with false information are common and were not a reason for alarm. "It feels like we just jumped into 2018 or 2016. This happens every year. The AG is on top of it, it’s under control through the state level. I would expect to see more of it frankly," the official said.

Voters battle malfunctioning machines and misinformation at some polling sites

Some voters saw hiccups with election machines and infrastructure Tuesday morning, but there were no major reports of widespread problems for what is expected to be an historic turnout.

Particular attention is being given to key battleground states, such as Georgia, Ohio and Pennsylvania, where President Donald Trump and Democratic nominee Joe Biden are vying for votes in what is largely viewed as one of the most bitterly divisive presidential elections in recent memory and coming amid a backdrop of a raging pandemic that has killed more than 232,000 in the United States.

"Thought we would be smart getting here early," Becca McCormick, 35, said in a video as she waited on a line 100 people deep just before 7 a.m. in Roxborough, a Philadelphia neighborhood. "But turns out so did everyone else."

In the swing state of North Carolina, several polling places were reporting technical issues when polls opened at 6:30 a.m., including a site in the capital city of Raleigh.

Voters in Franklin County, Ohio, and Spalding County, Georgia, were instructed to use paper ballots after technical glitches with machines. The issues in Spalding County were resolved later in the morning.

Read more here.

Israeli columnists fret over U.S. elections

Columnists in Israel fretted about the U.S. election Tuesday and its potential to affect domestic and regional politics

“A lot of politicians aren’t going to sleep tonight anxiously waiting for the results of the American elections,” columnist Sima Kadmon wrote in the popular Hebrew daily Yedioth Ahronoth. 

While the U.S. has long been a firm ally of Israel, and Joe Biden has said that he would sustain "an ironclad commitment to Israel’s security," Trump has endeared himself to many Israelis. The president has withdrawn the U.S. from the historic 2015 nuclear agreement with Iran, moved the American Embassy to Jerusalem and helped drive the normalization of relations between Israel and the United Arab Emirates and Bahrain.  

In The Jerusalem Post, Andrew Lövy directed his column to readers who could vote in the U.S., writing: "If you truly care about Israel, you need to vote for Donald Trump."

That's because, he wrote, Trump has been the most pro-Israel president "during my lifetime."

As many as 7 in 10 Jewish Israelis say that when it comes to their country's interests, Trump is their preferred candidate in the election, according to a survey from the Israel Democracy Institute

Meanwhile, in Palestinian news agency Maan, Nasser Al Laham writes that a Trump re-election mean the capitulation of Arab states. 

“Saudi Arabia will become the undisputed leader of Arab regimes with money, politics and security,” he said, a likely reference to the Gulf kingdom’s close relationship with the Trump White House and also its growing regional ambitions.