IE 11 is not supported. For an optimal experience visit our site on another browser.

Highlights and analysis from Election Day 2020

Presidential election results as ballots are counted in key swing states for President Trump and Joe Biden. Get live coverage and electoral vote updates.
Watch NBC News special election coverage
Watch NBC News special election coverage

Election Day is over, with polls having closed across the country and officials processing both in-person and mail-in ballots.

As Tuesday bled into Wednesday, President Donald Trump and Joe Biden were running a tight race. Trump was projected to win some key battleground states such as Florida, Ohio and Texas, while Biden was projected to win New Hampshire and Minnesota. Meanwhile, election officials in three other key states, Pennsylvania, Michigan and Arizona, still have millions of ballots to count.

This live coverage has ended. Continue reading election news from November 4, 2020.

Read live updates below:

North Carolina extends polling hours at some sites, delaying results

North Carolina won’t release any election results until after 8:15 p.m., after a late start at four polling sites earned those precincts extended polling hours. 

Polls in the state are scheduled to be open from 6:30 a.m until 7:30 p.m.; North Carolina law allows the state board to order minute-for-minute extensions when delays go past 15 minutes, but such orders delay the release of election results after all polling precincts have closed.

The state board of elections ruled that a polling site at the Plainview fire station in Dunn, N.C., will stay open for an additional 45 minutes after opening 45 minutes late Tuesday morning due to printer issues.

Three other polling sites were extended as well for periods ranging from 17 to 34 minutes, and the state board will do so for additional precinct polling sites if any are interrupted for more than 15 minutes.

Michigan mayor who voted for Trump in 2016: 'I regret my vote'

The Republican mayor of Sterling Heights, Michigan, told MSNBC on Tuesday that voting for Donald Trump in 2016 was a "mistake" he will not be repeating.

"Trump is just bad for our country. He’s bad for the city of Sterling Heights, he’s bad for Macomb County, and I made a mistake," said Michael Taylor, who said he cast his ballot for Joe Biden in this election and has been outspoken in recent months about his disdain for Trump. "I regret my vote."

Taylor said he is not alone: In his part of the crucial battleground state, he is seeing fewer Trump signs than he did four years ago. 

"What I've hearing from neighbors and friends and family members, we're concerned about his leadership on the pandemic. We’re concerned about what he's doing dis-unifying the country," Taylor said. "We need strong leadership. We need somebody who’s focused on getting our kids back to school, getting our jobs back. And he's more focused on his Twitter account."

Cincinnati voters head to polls with pandemic, economy and equality on their minds

CINCINNATI — Ohioans went to the polls Tuesday with their top issues of concern — the pandemic, the economy, protests and getting children back to school — at top of mind.

“Obviously, the elections are important, and everyone has to exercise their right to vote," said Tiffany Forde, 36, a Biden supporter from Cincinnati. "If you want to see change, and if we want change in our communities and at the presidential level, then it’s important — especially for people of color, whose ancestors went through a lot to be able to vote.”

Voting lines in Cincinnati appeared to be manageable at many polling places Tuesday. Across the state, which is considered a toss-up by the NBC News Political Unit, more than 3.4 million people voted before Election Day, Ohio Secretary of State Frank LaRose tweeted Monday night.

Cincinnati resident Midge Hall, 85, and her daughter, Lisa Gerard, headed to the polls together with opposing views on who should lead the country for the next four years. 

Hall, a Trump supporter who raised eight kids, believes children need to be in school. “If they exercise what they’re supposed to do, I think the schools can be safe," she said. "If you keep your distance and if they are properly supervised, it can happen.

In 2016, Gerard, 50, voted for Trump as a long-time Republican, but has since broken family ranks by switching her party affiliation to Democratic, something her mother only found out after leaving the polls Tuesday. 

“We’re ready for a change," Gerard said. "I’m worried about equality. I’m worried about the people” and the direction of the country. “We really need to get this covid thing under control.”

Judge orders USPS inspectors to sweep mail facilities for unsent ballots

Federal district Judge Emmet Sullivan on Tuesday ordered U.S. Postal Service inspectors or their designees to “sweep” postal facilities by 3 p.m. ET “to ensure that no ballots have been held up and that any identified ballots are immediately sent out for delivery.”

Sullivan's order, which covers regions in many swing states, including Philadelphia, Detroit, Atlanta, Houston, South Florida, Arizona and parts of South Carolina, comes after the USPS said just 62% of Central Pennsylvania’s ballots moved on-time this past Saturday.

Sullivan set a 4:30 p.m. ET deadline for “a status update" on the sweeps.

Three states, many colors of Election Day

Voters wait in line outside the Hialeah John F. Kennedy Library to cast their votes on Election Day in Miami.Sam Navarro / for NBC News
Sk Hashan, Laila Dola and Ireen Mahmood take a selfie after voting at PS 69 in the Jackson Heights neighborhood of Queens, New York City.Amy Lombard / for NBC News
A voter shows her enthusiasm in Phoenix.Dominic Valente / for NBC News

In the skies of Philadelphia, a jab at Trump makes the rounds

Philadelphians were quick to spot a plane circling their city on Tuesday bearing an apparent jab at the president.

"TRUMP <3'S JERRY JONES & THE COWBOYS," the plane's banner read.

Jones, the billionaire owner of the Dallas Cowboys football team, has long been an acquaintance of Trump, having recently sent the president well-wishes after Trump's Covid-19 diagnosis in early October.

The Philadelphia Eagles defeated the division rival Cowboys 23-9 in a game over the weekend. 

In pizza we crust: On an Election Day like no other, pie delivery remains a constant

The town hall with President Donald Trump plays on a television inside a pizza shop in Washington, D.C., on Oct. 15, 2020.Tasos Katopodis / Getty Images

Election night is to pizza parlors what Valentine’s Day is to florists. However, with large gatherings discouraged during the pandemic, pizzeria owners across America are not sure what to expect.

During previous elections and big news events, media outlets would have dozens of pies delivered throughout the night to feed journalists working in the newsroom. But many of the city’s media outlets, including NBC News, are still having reporters work from home. That means local pizza shops will be missing out on some of their biggest customers on election night.

But with many schools being closed and some offices giving employees the day off to vote, "we're definitely expecting to see an increase in delivery, pick-up and dining at the restaurant,” one pizzeria owner told NBC News. “Our culinary team is doubling up on product and prep, and everyone is ready for a busy night.”

Read the story here.

Trump to campaign staff: 'Winning is easy, losing is never easy'

Speaking to staffers at his campaign headquarters in Northern Virginia, Trump expressed confidence that he's doing well in certain battleground states and suggested that losing the election would not be easy for him. 

"I hear we're doing very well in Florida, we're doing very well in Arizona, we're doing incredibly well in Texas," Trump told his campaign staff at the Republican National Committee annex in Arlington, Va. "The lines have been amazing, and I think we're going to have a great night."

Trump said that he isn't thinking about a concession or an acceptance speech yet. 

"Hopefully, we'll be only doing one of those two and you know, winning is easy. Losing is never easy — not for me it's not," he said. 

Trump continued by bashing a Supreme Court decision that is allowing Pennsylvania to count mail-in ballots several days after Election Day. 

"I think we should know what happens on the night. Let people put their ballots in earlier,” he said. “You have to have numbers. You can't have these things delayed for many days and maybe weeks, you can't do that. The whole world is waiting. This country is waiting, the whole world is waiting."

"We should be entitled to know who won on Nov. 3," he added.

'Future voter' checks out her polling place in Brooklyn

Zora King shows her "future voter" sticker at Borough Hall on Election Day in Brooklyn, N.Y., on Tuesday.Caitlin Ochs / Reuters

Some Republicans feel protected by 6-3 Supreme Court, even if Biden wins

WASHINGTON — Republican voters fearing a potential Joe Biden presidency are taking some solace in the belief that a newly conservative Supreme Court with Justice Amy Coney Barrett will restrain Democratic ambitions.

Some of President Donald Trump’s supporters believe the new 6-3 majority of Republican appointees will be a bulwark against a Biden administration’s attempts to move the country in a more progressive direction.

“We have no fears because there’s a conservative Supreme Court now,” said Cynthia Manville of Buckeye, Arizona, who attended a Trump rally in Phoenix last Wednesday. “We feel if Democrats cast legislation that’s radical liberal, it wouldn’t stand the test of time.”

“God has a certain way of watching over this country,” said Manville, who attended with her husband, Steve, both of whom were wearing red “Make America Great Again” hats.

The conservative victory on the court eases one of the biggest sources of anxiety among Republican voters, which has tended to be a motivator to vote. In 2016, an open Supreme Court seat galvanized evangelicals behind Trump. In the run-up to 2020 Election Day, Trump sought to bring back that urgency by warning that Biden could "pack the court" and erase their gains.

Read more here.

Polling locations in Las Vegas experiencing technical difficulties

Several polling locations in Clark County, which includes Las Vegas, were experiencing technical difficulties Tuesday morning and have not yet opened, according to a tweet from the Nevada secretary of state's office. 

“If you are waiting in line, please be patient,” the tweet said. “The sites will open soon.” 

In Nevada, polls opened at 7 a.m. and close at 7 p.m. Those who are voting in person will be allowed to cast their votes as long as they are in line at a polling location by 7 p.m. All polling locations also double as ballot drop-off sites.

More than 1.1 million voters had cast their ballots by Monday morning in the battleground state, according to NBC News' count.