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Highlights and analysis from Election Day 2020

Presidential election results as ballots are counted in key swing states for President Trump and Joe Biden. Get live coverage and electoral vote updates.
Watch NBC News special election coverage
Watch NBC News special election coverage

Election Day is over, with polls having closed across the country and officials processing both in-person and mail-in ballots.

As Tuesday bled into Wednesday, President Donald Trump and Joe Biden were running a tight race. Trump was projected to win some key battleground states such as Florida, Ohio and Texas, while Biden was projected to win New Hampshire and Minnesota. Meanwhile, election officials in three other key states, Pennsylvania, Michigan and Arizona, still have millions of ballots to count.

This live coverage has ended. Continue reading election news from November 4, 2020.

Read live updates below:

Analysis: Trump gets huge boost in Miami-Dade County in Florida

President Trump has improved over his raw vote total in Miami-Dade County in Florida by more than 100,000 votes with ballots still to be counted. Trump has more than 457,000 votes compared to 334,000 in Miami-Dade four years ago. 

That's with about 84 percent of precincts reporting. Biden is within about 10,000 votes of Hillary Clinton's total at the moment. The Miami-Dade area includes much of Florida's Cuban American community, which Trump had pinpointed as a constituency that could help him carry Florida again.

In some counties, Biden already has outpaced Clinton's numbers. But nothing so far is as dramatic as Trump's boost in Miami-Dade.

Swing states Ohio, North Carolina too early to call

Ohio and North Carolina, two closely watched swing states, are too early to call, NBC News projects.

NBC News Exit Poll: Biden favored by Virginians on issues of coronavirus, economy

Polls are now closed in Virginia. While the race is too early to call according to the NBC News Decision Desk, early returns show former Vice President Joe Biden is leading.  

One issue on the minds of Virginia voters and elsewhere is the pandemic: 56 percent of Virginia voters see U.S. efforts to contain the coronavirus pandemic as going badly. Just 42 percent think the handling of the pandemic has been going well.

The NBC News Exit Poll of early and Election Day voters found that most Virginians who’ve cast a ballot see Biden as the candidate better able to handle the coronavirus pandemic by a margin of 57 to 38.

Biden is also edging out President Trump with Virginia voters as the candidate better able to handle the economy, 52 to 45.

Biden wins Vermont, NBC News projects

NBC News projects Biden as the winner in Vermont, an outcome that was widely predicted.

Road to 270: Finish the map on our interactive page

It will take at least 270 electoral votes to win the 2020 presidential election. Finish the 2020 map on our interactive page by clicking or tapping an individual state or toggle in order to move it to red or blue. States where NBC News has projected a winner cannot be changed.

NBC News Exit Poll: Ohio voters support Trump's approach to the economy

The economy has always been an area of strength for President Trump, and his approach continues to resonate with Ohio voters. According to the NBC News Exit Poll of early and Election Day voters, Ohio voters say Trump would handle the economy better than Joe Biden by a 14-point margin, 56 percent to 42 percent.

Ohio voters are also more aligned with Trump’s philosophy on the coronavirus pandemic than voters are nationally. In Ohio, voters are about evenly divided between those who say that containing the coronavirus, even if it hurts the economy, is more important (47 percent), and those who say that rebuilding the economy now, even if it hurts efforts to contain the coronavirus, is more important (48 percent). By contrast, voters nationally stress the importance of containing the coronavirus by a 10-point margin.

The GOP also has a built-in partisan advantage in Ohio: According to the exit poll, self-described Republican voters in Ohio outnumber Democrats 40 to 30 percent. Nationally, Democrats slightly outnumber Republicans 38 to 35 percent. 

Lumber yards see record sales for plywood as stores, businesses board up

Construction crews board up shop windows in downtown Portland, Ore., on Election Day.Alisha Jucevic / for NBC News

Retailers rushing to board up their windows in preparation for political unrest have led to record sales at building supply companies across the country’s largest cities. 

“I’ve never seen anything like this in my 14 years with the company,” John Torres, a salesman with Prince Lumber in New York City, said. 

Over the weekend, the company sold more than 500 pieces of plywood. The last time demand reached that level was in June in response to looting and property damage during demonstrations over the death of George Floyd, he said.

“The only thing we know is that people are really scared of what’s going to happen,” he said. “The phone is still ringing.”

Storefront businesses across the country from Lululemon to Louis Vuitton have boarded up their windows to protect themselves from potential unrest around the election. 

Over the last month, work orders for plywood have poured in to local supply companies. Between Oct. 5 and Nov. 2, 906 stores ordered preventive board-up or additional security in advance of the election, according to ServiceChannel, a software company that connects real estate businesses with local commercial contractors.

NBC News Exit Poll: In Georgia, Biden reverses slide in Democrats' performance among white voters

President Trump is winning solid support from white voters in Georgia, but results from the NBC News Exit Poll indicate that Democrat Joe Biden is doing better among these voters than any Democrat in decades. The exit poll was conducted with representative sample of the state’s early and Election Day voters. Georgia remained too early to call when polls closed in the state at 7 p.m. ET.

This year, Georgia and its 16 electoral votes emerged as a battleground for the first time in decades. Both Biden and Trump visited the state in the final week before Election Day, and both campaigns also spent millions of dollars on television ads aimed at Georgia voters. One of the reasons for the state’s newfound competitiveness is that Georgia’s white voters have reversed their decadeslong shift toward the Republican Party. 

While Trump leads Biden solidly among whites in Georgia, 68 percent to 30 percent, this margin is substantially slimmer than in 2016, when Trump amassed a 75 percent to 21 percent gap over Democrat Hillary Clinton among these voters. In fact, no Democrat has performed as well as Biden with Georgia white voters since Bill Clinton did in his first bid for the presidency in 1992 — the last time a Democrat won the state.

Biden’s gains among whites are keeping things competitive in Georgia, but most of his support is coming from the state’s voters of color, who made up 40 percent of the electorate there this year. Biden is overwhelming Trump among these voters, 81 percent to 17 percent.

 

Gay bars in Houston, San Francisco transform into polling sites

Buddy's, an LGBTQ bar in Houston, transformed itself into a polling location on Tuesday. 

"It’s been wonderful! The reception has been overwhelmingly positive. The poll workers are excited. There’s a lot of great energy. We’re all very excited about the whole process," Chris Barry, the bar's owner, told NBC News shortly before the polls closed. 

Located in Houston's gay-friendly Montrose neighborhood, Buddy's brought in 14 voting booths where anyone registered to vote in Harris County, the most populous county in Texas, can cast their ballot until 7 p.m. CT.

Voters leave Buddy's on Election Day in Houston.Callaghan O'Hare / Reuters

 

The tagline for Buddy's Election Day event — which is expected to have cocktails, karaoke and drag queens — is "Vote in the front. Party in the back!"

In a post shared to its Facebook page, the venue claims to be the "world's 1st presidential polling location from an LGBTQ+ bar." 

However, it has company: The Eagle, a gay leather bar in San Francisco, is also letting voters cast their ballots at the venue, according to the San Francisco Chronicle. The paper reported that voters filled out their ballots "under chains hanging from pitch black ceilings" as a "disco ball spun overhead."

Kornacki: Early and mail-in voting turnout high, but keep an eye on same-day voting