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Highlights and analysis from Election Day 2020

Presidential election results as ballots are counted in key swing states for President Trump and Joe Biden. Get live coverage and electoral vote updates.
Watch NBC News special election coverage
Watch NBC News special election coverage

Election Day is over, with polls having closed across the country and officials processing both in-person and mail-in ballots.

As Tuesday bled into Wednesday, President Donald Trump and Joe Biden were running a tight race. Trump was projected to win some key battleground states such as Florida, Ohio and Texas, while Biden was projected to win New Hampshire and Minnesota. Meanwhile, election officials in three other key states, Pennsylvania, Michigan and Arizona, still have millions of ballots to count.

This live coverage has ended. Continue reading election news from November 4, 2020.

Read live updates below:

Fulton County, Georgia, results will be stalled

ATLANTA — The Fulton County Registration and Elections Department now says it will continue counting ballots tonight, after officials initially said it would stop counting mail-in ballots at 10:30 p.m., and resume the count Wednesday morning. Fulton is Georgia's most populous county, and includes most of the city of Atlanta.

This means there will be no decisive results for Fulton County on Tuesday night, which will affect when the results for Georgia, overall, are known.

Biden wins New Hampshire, NBC News projects

NBC News projects that Biden will win New Hampshire — a contested state that was not called until much later in the night during the 2016 election. That year, Clinton won by a narrow margin.

Internet outage at Florida election office to delay some voting results

An internet outage hit the office of a central Florida supervisor of elections on Tuesday night shortly before polls closed in the battleground state. 

The office, which is responsible for tabulating ballots cast in Osceola County, is working with the cable and internet provider Spectrum to restore internet service, Supervisor of Elections Mary Jane Arrington said. Arrington said that the process of manually uploading the results data from the different polling locations is about halfway done. “It’s going pretty quick and hopefully we’ll be done by midnight,” she said.

Spectrum said that it is trying to resolve the situation. 

“A construction crew unrelated to Spectrum severed a bundle of fiber optic cables in Kissimmee that serves the Supervisor of Elections office,” Spectrum said in a statement. “We have crews onsite working to repair the damage and restore service as quickly as possible.”

The internet outage is expected to delay reporting of results in Osceola County.

“They're actually driving their results to the central location for reporting,” a senior Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency official said in a press call.

Democrat Mark Kelly leading in Arizona Senate race, but too early to call, NBC News projects

NBC News projects that Democrat Mark Kelly, a former astronaut, is leading in the Arizona Senate special election but is it still too early to call. 

Kelly is leading with 55.4 percent of the vote against GOP incumbent Sen. Martha McSally, who received 44.6 percent of the vote, as of 10:20 p.m., with 73 percent of the vote in. 

This is one of the crucial seats for Democrats this election, which would make their path to Senate majority smoother. The Democrats picked up a seat in Colorado but lost a seat in Alabama. 

NBC News Exit Poll: Biden is favorite among voters who suffered Covid-19 financial hardship

Amid an economic downturn brought on by the coronavirus pandemic, 55 percent of voters nationwide say that the coronavirus has caused them a financial hardship — including 17 percent who say it has caused them a severe financial hardship.

According to the NBC News Exit Poll of early and Election Day voters, among those most severely affected financially, Joe Biden is the clear favorite: 72 percent of voters who have suffered a severe financial hardship say they are casting a ballot for the Democratic candidate.

Among those voters who have suffered a moderate hardship, 62 percent say they voted for Biden, while 36 percent voted for President Trump.

But Trump is favored among those who say they have suffered no economic setbacks due to the coronavirus: 55 percent of these voters chose Trump, while 43 percent cast a ballot for Biden.

Voters of color are among the most likely groups to say they have suffered a severe financial hardship as a result of the pandemic: 21 percent of Black voters say they have suffered a severe hardship, along with 36 percent of Hispanic voters. In contrast, just 12 percent of white voters say they’ve taken a severe financial hit due to the virus.

Republicans flip Alabama Senate seat red, dealing blow to Democrats

Republicans gained a crucial seat Tuesday night, with Republican Tommy Tuberville winning the Alabama Senate race, NBC News projects.

This is a blow to Democrats, who won the seat in 2018 with Democrat Doug Jones. Jones was the first Democrat to represent the state in the Senate in 25 years. This pushed the number Democrats need to win Senate majority from three to four after the party flipped a seat in Colorado. 

Democrats keep control of House, NBC News projects

Democrats keep control of the House, NBC News projects.

The party was expected to hold its majority, which was 232-197 going into the election. The result opens the door for Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., to seek another two-year term as speaker.

Democrats gained control of the House in 2018 after running on kitchen table issues, such as healthcare and the economy, and, in part, to the unpopularity of President Trump.

Voters of color and traditionally Republican suburban women were seen as key to the Democrats gaining control of the House. 

Pelosi has vowed to push an ambitious agenda if Democrats retained control, such as providing more healthcare protections to Americans and more coronavirus-related aid. 

Biden wins New Mexico, NBC News projects

Biden will win New Mexico, NBC News projects.

As it stands, Biden now holds a 94 to 72 Electoral College advantage over Trump. It takes 270 electoral votes to win.

NBC News Exit Poll: Latino voters in Florida shift toward Trump

Latinos constitute 19 percent of the electorate in Florida and, compared to Latinos in other states, their vote has tended to be more evenly split between Republicans and Democrats.

An analysis of Latino voting trends in Florida since 2008 suggest that Latinos were moving away from Republican candidates in 2012 and 2016, but have moved back toward Trump this year. According to the NBC News Exit Poll of early and election day voters, 47 percent of Latino voters in Florida supported Trump — up 12 percentage points from 2016. 

This pattern seems to be taking place despite the growing number of Puerto Ricans — who lean far more heavily Democratic than Cubans — in Florida’s electorate. Today, nearly 3 out of 10 Latino voters in Florida identify as Puerto Rican. According to the NBC News exit poll of the early and Election Day voters, about a third of Puerto Rican voters in Florida today supported Trump. In comparison, 56 percent of Cuban voters  supported Trump. 

In addition, about 40 percent of Latino voters in Florida identify as neither Puerto Rican nor Cuban. This subset of Florida’s Latino electorate includes Venezuelans, many of whom left Venezuela due to frustrations with the socialist government and consequently tend to support more conservative governments. About 50 percent of these voters supported Trump, slightly less than Cubans but more than Puerto Ricans.

CORRECTION (Nov. 5, 2020, 12:29 p.m. ET): A previous version of this article misstated the percentage of Latino voters in Florida. They make up 19 percent of the electorate in the state, not 30 percent.

As Michigan tallies its vote, Democrats are encouraged by high voter turnout in Detroit

DETROIT — As election workers continue to tally the vote in Michigan two hours after polls closed, Democrats are encouraged by the apparently high voter turnout in Detroit.

Detroit City Clerk Janice Winfrey, addressing reporters about an hour after polls closed at 8 p.m. ET, said turnout in the city — fueled by an unprecedented flood of absentee ballots —  appeared to be between 53 and 55 percent. That's as high or even higher than in 2008 when the opportunity to elect Barack Obama as the nation's first Black president energized voters in this overwhelmingly Black city.

It's a big change from four years ago when low turnout in Detroit — just 48 percent — robbed Hillary Clinton of the support she needed to defeat Donald Trump in this crucial state. He won Michigan by 10,704 votes.

Election Day went smoothly in Detroit, Winfrey said, with few problems at voting precincts where only 15 percent of voters cast ballots in person, and with absentee ballot counting happening faster than many feared in the wake of a botched primary election.

By 7:30 p.m., Winfrey said, 120,000 ballots had been tabulated and she predicted that final numbers would be available by Wednesday.