EVENT ENDED

Nevada caucuses live updates: Bernie Sanders wins Nevada Democratic caucuses

The candidates — not including Mike Bloomberg, who is not on the ballot — competed for the state's 36 pledged delegates.
Image: The Nevada caucuses will take place on Feb. 22, 2020.
The Nevada caucuses will take place on Feb. 22, 2020.Chelsea Stahl / NBC News

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Bernie Sanders was the winner of Saturday's Nevada caucuses, according to an NBC News projection.

Saturday's caucuses followed a fiery debate among the candidates earlier in the week in which Sanders, Joe Biden and Elizabeth Warren challenged former New York City Mayor Mike Bloomberg on sexism and race and Amy Klobuchar sparred with Pete Buttigieg over their political experience.

Nevada is the first Western state in the Democratic presidential primary following New Hampshire and the chaos that was the Iowa caucuses.

Read the latest updates:

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Live Blog

Pigeons with MAGA hats glued to their heads released in Vegas

LAS VEGAS — Pigeons with tiny Make American Great Again hats glued to their heads were released in downtown Las Vegas this week in what appears to be a sarcastic statement of loyalty to President Donald Trump and a mock protest of Nevada's coming Democratic presidential caucuses.

 

A group calling itself P.U.T.I.N., Pigeons United To Interfere Now, claimed responsibility for the stunt. The pigeons were set loose Tuesday, according to the group.

Twenty-five pigeons were released, 24 of them wearing hats and one donning a Trump-style wig, the group said Thursday in an email to NBC News.

For the full story click here

Nevada Dems say they registered over 10,000 people during early voting

Nevada Democrats say they registered more than 10,000 voters as Democrats during early voting.

As a reminder, almost 75,000 people early voted in the Nevada caucuses. There are currently almost 700,000 registered Democrats in all of Nevada, per the January 2020 Secretary of State info. 

 

How Nevada's caucus results will be reported — with some help from Google

After an app contributed to widespread problems with Iowa’s caucus reporting, Nevada Democrats scrapped plans to use similar apps made by the same developer. They’ve since turned to a homebrewed solution.

The counts and delegates will be calculated and assigned two ways: a paper “Math Poster” worksheet hung on the wall at the precinct locations, and an off-the-shelf Google Forms app loaded onto an iPad provided by the state party, according to publicly available caucus training slides prepared by the party. The party calls the Google system the “Caucus Calculator.”

Both the calculator system and the poster will be used to log caucusgoers and help calculate a candidate’s viability at each location. Each candidate must meet a precinct-specific minimum threshold of support to be considered viable.

Click here to read the full story.

For Nevada Republicans it's a normal Saturday

LAS VEGAS — While Democratic voters here will flock to caucus sites to express their preference in their party’s nominating contest, Republican voters will go about their day as normal.

That’s because the Republican Party voted last year to cancel its caucus.

The decision was made to help clear the path to re-election for President Donald Trump. By canceling its caucus, the party ensures that voters don’t have the opportunity to formally put their support behind a different Republican candidate for president.

Click here for the full story.

'Taking no chances': Nevada Dems hire massive call center to avoid caucus meltdown

LAS VEGAS — Nervous about another fiasco like Iowa's, Democrats here and nationally are going to extra lengths to try to avoid a breakdown in the caucus process that could delay results on Saturday.

Nevada Democrats have hired a professional call center with 200 paid operators and dedicated reporting lines to help take in results from caucus sites around the state, diverging from Iowa where lightly trained volunteers manned the phones and reported chaos and jammed phoned lines after an app that was supposed to process most of the results malfunctioned.

"We have been working around the clock to ensure that what happened in Iowa will not happen here, which is why we're taking no chances when it comes to reporting," Molly Forgey, spokesperson for the Nevada Democratic Party, told NBC News. She added that the steps taken should "ensure that our precinct chairs and site leads will be able to successfully report results on caucus day."

Click here to read the full story.

Trump tells Democratic voters in Nevada to 'be careful of Russia, Russia, Russia'

 

5 things to watch in the Nevada caucuses: Can anyone stop Bernie Sanders?

LAS VEGAS — Nevada kicks off a new phase of the Democratic presidential race Saturday as the first 2020 contest with an electorate that reflects the diversity of the party.

It could be a knockout round for candidates who fail to attract a broad coalition of voters. Whether or not it causes some of them to exit, Nevada will signify to voters in critical upcoming contests who is viable and who isn’t.

Polls say Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt. is the front-runner heading into the caucuses, with former Vice President Joe Biden, former South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg, Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., businessman and philanthropist Tom Steyer and Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., all in the hunt. Former New York City Mayor Mike Bloomberg, who is surging in national surveys and had a rocky debate this week, is skipping the first four states and won't be on the ballot here.

Click here for five things to watch for as Nevada Democrats vote.

 

Sen. Bernie Sanders had a message for President Putin and Russia after being briefed that the Kremlin is attempting to help his campaign.

Caucus chaos again? Experts fear vote-counting problems in Nevada

LAS VEGAS — A new early-voting system, high turnout and questions about a never-before-used digital tool being used to process results could threaten the success of the Nevada Democratic caucuses on Saturday, election experts told NBC News.

"I don't see how any technologist or any party official or any political scientist can promise that this will turn out OK," said Mark Lindeman, the director of science and technology policy for Verified Voting, a nonpartisan nonprofit group that advocates for election accuracy and transparency.

"There are too many tools and procedures that are being rolled out, some at the last minute," he continued. "And my impression is that the people on the ground who are charged with implementing these procedures and using these tools are not confident they can do it."

Lindeman added, "I hope that it goes better than Iowa, but it is definitely at risk for similar reasons."

Read more here.