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2020 New Hampshire Democratic Primary: Sanders victorious

Check out the latest results and analysis from NBC News.
Image: The New Hampshire primary will be held on Tues., Feb. 11, 2020.
The New Hampshire primary will be held on Tues., Feb. 11, 2020.Chelsea Stahl / NBC News

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Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., on Tuesday claimed victory in the New Hampshire primary, the second Democratic contest of the 2020 election.

All eyes were on New Hampshire after last week's chaotic Iowa caucuses, where problems with the app used for reporting results delayed the outcome for days.

Read below for the latest updates or see the full results here.

Highlights from the New Hampshire primary:

Download the NBC News app for full coverage and alerts on the latest news.

Live Blog

Who's spent the most time in New Hampshire?

5 Things to watch in New Hampshire: Why losers matter as much as winners

Iowa was a mess. Democrats are hoping New Hampshire will provide more clarity.

Tuesday's first-in-the-nation New Hampshire primary, which is marking its 100th anniversary, may be more important than it has been in years in deciding the future of the Democratic presidential field, with a number of once-leading candidates teetering on the brink of oblivion and some former no-names gaining steam.

The state is famously unpredictable and can swing faster than polls can capture, especially because independent voters, who outnumber Democrats and Republicans, can vote in the primary.

Here are five things to watch.

How does the New Hampshire primary work?

Tuesday marks the New Hampshire primary, the second Democratic contest of the 2020 presidential cycle.

After last week's chaotic Iowa caucuses, campaigns are looking to the Granite State for more clarity on the race.

Here's what you need to know about how the New Hampshire primary works.

Warren keeps supporters fueled up

Sen. Elizabeth Warren offers doughnuts to supporters at a polling site in Portsmouth, N.H., on Feb. 11, 2020.Brian Snyder / Reuters

Biden says he's New Hampshire 'underdog," but still the best candidate to beat Trump

Former Vice President Joe Biden told MSNBC's "Morning Joe" on Tuesday that he sees himself as the "underdog" in the New Hampshire primary after finishing fourth in the Iowa caucuses and with his rival Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., leading polls in the Granite State. 

"I think I’m an underdog here, and Bernie won this by 20 points last time," Biden said. "He’s got a next-door neighbor advantage and he’s got a real enthusiasm going here, but I still feel good. This is, you know, it’s a long haul." 

Biden said he thinks he is still the best candidate to beat Trump because he can win over working-class voters. 

"I think Donald Trump’s demonstrated the last guy he wants to run against is me," he said. " And look, I have always done extremely well in places like Pennsylvania, and I’ve done extremely well in the South as well."

Biden also challenged former New York City mayor and billionaire businessman Mike Bloomberg's support among black voters — a core constituency of the Democratic party and a large part of Biden's lead in national polling. 

"I’m looking forward to debating Mike Bloomberg about his support for African Americans," Biden said. 

The former vice president repeated his criticism of Sen. Bernie Sanders' embrace of democratic socialism, saying that running on socialism would be a problem in the general; however, Biden would not say he thinks Sanders is unelectable.

"I refuse to suggest any Democrat can lose," he said. "I think, you know, we could run Mickey Mouse against this president and have a shot."

Trump advisers say their ideal Democratic primary scenario is taking shape

One clear winner has emerged so far from the Democratic presidential contest, according to strategists aligned with the presidential re-election team this year — Donald Trump.

That's the thinking among Republican strategists as Joe Biden sees his poll numbers decline in New Hampshire and a two-way race between Bernie Sanders and Pete Buttigieg appears to emerge ahead of Tuesday's Democratic primary here, yielding what they see as a best-case scenario for Trump.

Trump himself agrees. "If you want to vote for a weak candidate tomorrow, go ahead," he told supporters at a primary eve rally in Manchester, New Hampshire Monday night, suggesting they were free to sabotage the Democratic vote, since his victory in the Republican contest was certain. "Pick one. Pick the weakest one you think. I don't know who that is."

While politicians and political operatives aren't always the best at picking their opponents — Hillary Clinton's campaign was gleeful over the prospect of running against Trump in 2016 — Republicans say they are salivating over the prospect of a head-to-head contest with either Sanders, an independent senator from Vermont, or Buttigieg, the former mayor of South Bend, Indiana.

Read the story.

Tuesday's front pages in New Hampshire

Candidates make last-ditch pitches as crucial New Hampshire vote nears

The Democratic presidential candidates were crisscrossing New Hampshire on Monday, making last-ditch pitches to voters one day before its critical first-in-the-nation primary and as President Donald Trump visited the Granite State to rally thousands from within eyeshot of the leading Democrats.

The Democrats held their biggest events of the race here Monday night — in some cases, their final calls for local voters to rally to their sides. The events were taking place as the Iowa caucus totals, which had both former South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg and Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., claiming victory, were being contested.

Entering primary day here, Sanders held a lead of more than 7 points over Buttigieg in the RealClearPolitics average of several polls. Following them was a more distant battle for third place among a surging Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., former Vice President Joe Biden and Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass.

"I think we're going to have a great night," Buttigieg said Monday when NBC's Savannah Guthrie, co-anchor of "TODAY," asked whether he was ready to predict a win. "Look, we are competing against home region competition, two New England senators, I recognize that, but I still think we're going to have a great night."

Read the story.

Trump looks to upstage Democrats heading into New Hampshire primary

On the eve of this state's first-in-the nation primary, President Donald Trump was in a nostalgic mood, reviving some of his favorite lines of attack from his 2016 campaign as he looked to disrupt the Democratic contest here.

The president's stop Monday in New Hampshire was a return to the site of his first big win in the GOP contest in 2016, in a state that he lost by just a few thousand votes to Hillary Clinton in the general election — a result that Trump again blamed on people who he falsely claimed had been bused in to vote from neighboring Massachusetts.

A supporter of President Donald Trump wears a shirt promoting future presidential runs by Trump's children at a rally on Feb. 10, 2020, in Manchester, N.H.Evan Vucci / AP

As he had during his first campaign, the president returned to his incendiary claim that some immigrants are murderers and rapists, and he recited a poem about a snake that sneaked into a woman's house and killed her — a metaphor he has used in the past for immigrants.

"You're on the eve of giving us an opponent, and all these people want open borders," Trump said. He said many immigrants "are not exactly what we're looking for, OK? I mean, murderers, rapists and some other things. They're going to be poisoning our children with drugs."

Read the story.

FIRST READ: How 2020 took away the most important role of Iowa and New Hampshire

It’s possible — maybe even likely — that a single top-tier candidate won't drop out of the Democratic presidential race after Tuesday's primary here.

Even if he finishes fourth (again), Joe Biden can plausibly take his campaign to South Carolina, where he hopes African-American voters can save him. (Then again, Monday’s Quinnipiac poll showed Biden already losing altitude with African Americans.)

And even if she comes in fifth (again), Amy Klobuchar might have every incentive to keep trucking along. After all, her single delegate out of Iowa gets her a spot in the next Democratic debate in Las Vegas.

One explanation why the current field might stick around through Nevada and South Carolina is because the field already got winnowed — not by Iowa and New Hampshire, but instead by the DNC’s debate-qualification process.

Get the rest of First Read.