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2020 New Hampshire Democratic Primary: Sanders victorious

Check out the latest results and analysis from NBC News.
Image: The New Hampshire primary will be held on Tues., Feb. 11, 2020.
The New Hampshire primary will be held on Tues., Feb. 11, 2020.Chelsea Stahl / NBC News

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Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., on Tuesday claimed victory in the New Hampshire primary, the second Democratic contest of the 2020 election.

All eyes were on New Hampshire after last week's chaotic Iowa caucuses, where problems with the app used for reporting results delayed the outcome for days.

Read below for the latest updates or see the full results here.

Highlights from the New Hampshire primary:

Download the NBC News app for full coverage and alerts on the latest news.

Live Blog

Warren visits with supporters — of Biden

Sen. Elizabeth Warren visits with supporters of Joe Biden outside of a polling place at Portsmouth Middle School on Feb. 11, 2020 in Portsmouth, N.H.Scott Olson / Getty Images

Election Confessions, New Hampshire edition

New Hampshire voters will have their chance to choose a Democratic nominee Tuesday, but some residents have already weighed in on the race — anonymously.

NBC News’ Election Confessions heard from people in the state who chimed in on everything from Joe Biden and Barack Obama’s “bromance” to President Donald Trump’s future.

“May you live long ... in the private sector,” one wrote about Trump. “Why does every Mayor of NYC think they would make a great President?” another wrote about the former candidate Bill de Blasio, one of the two 2020 candidates who have worked that job. “Yang is the first time I've been excited for a candidate ever,” a third wrote.

On Election Confessions, people from across the United States have shared more than 60,000 musings about the candidates, the country and its condition. Here are some of the more notable confessions from New Hampshire.

In New Hampshire, iPads and 1891 ballot boxes

The New Hampshire primary offers a look at just how varied elections systems can be. 

In two locations, new electronic poll books are being tested alongside the traditional paper-based poll books. Tom Freda, the moderator for the Londonderry, New Hampshire, polling place, said the new tech, which lets people sign in on iPads, "greatly speeds up the process."

"An old paper checklist, voters had to wait in a line that corresponded with their name. The lists had 800-1,000 names on them," Freda said. 

Freda noted that the new system had also been used in local elections.

But election advocates say polling places still need a paper poll book backup, and misconfiguration issues have led to long lines or voters being turned away in some cases.

Other polling locations are holding on to their roots. New Hampshire Secretary of State Bill Gardner said that more than 40 towns are using ballot boxes that date back to 1891. 

"There's no way you can hack that," Gardner said.

OPINION: To win New Hampshire, Pete Buttigieg and Bernie Sanders need independent voters

Every four years, the nation’s focus turns to the small state of New Hampshire, that I call home, and the first real time that the candidates vying for their parties' nominations will face a vote. As someone who was born and raised in Manchester, I have seen countless primaries firsthand as both a resident and later a campaign staffer, and I have been lucky to meet, shake hands and attend town halls with many presidential hopefuls — something that many New Hampshirites view as part of their civic duty.

New Hampshire has always been a battleground state with its treasure trove of independent voters, and it’s no secret that it is a key focus state for Trump's re-election campaign — he even hosted a rally in Manchester on Monday evening. Meanwhile, while spending close to an estimated $150 million in the state, Sens. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., and Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., former South Bend, Indiana, mayor Pete Buttigieg and former Vice President Joe Biden have spent the last week crisscrossing every nook and cranny in the small state trying to drum up as many votes as possible.

But some Democrats have more to lose in New Hampshire than just a primary.

According to polling from The Boston Globe/WBZ-TV/Suffolk University released Thursday, Sanders (23.6 percent) had only a 1 point lead over Buttigieg (22.6 percent) who was surging after his Iowa showing, while Biden was coming in at only 10.6 percent. A 7 News-Emerson College poll conducted over the weekend similarly shows Sanders and Buttigieg in the lead, with Klobuchar and Warren surprisingly ahead of Biden.

Read the full opinion piece.

Analysis: The best unused unity argument

All the Democratic candidates are making the case that they can bring their party and the country together. Some focus more on the former and some more on the latter, but both will be needed for one of them to win the presidency.

Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar likes to point out that she won a lot of counties in her 2018 Senate re-election bid that President Donald Trump also won in her state in 2016. It's not the best comparison because Klobuchar was running against a pretty underwhelming opponent. Her first Senate victory — and the oft-cited fact that she's never lost an election — is probably a better testament to her ability to win a race against a Republican.

But what she hasn't really trotted out is perhaps the most compelling storyline any of the Democrats could tell about unifying the party. While she has critics within her party at home, Klobuchar hasn't been targeted for primary defeat by the left the way that many other senators have. She's been strong across her party in Minnesota — and that's no small feat because it's the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party.

None of the other presidential candidates comes from a state with a Democratic congressional delegation as ideologically diverse as Klobuchar's, which features conservative Rep. Collin Petersen, who voted against impeaching Trump, and Rep. Ilhan Omar, who is among the most liberal members of Congress. In her Senate races, Klobuchar has to win backing from farmers along the state's border with the Dakotas, union members in the Lake Superior region, and a diverse mix of voters in the Twin Cities and their suburbs. Minnesota's DFL is a uniquely big-tent version of the Democratic Party, and Klobuchar may start to talk more about it.

'The Conners' sitcom to air live with real-time New Hampshire results

News organizations around the U.S. will be concentrated on New Hampshire tonight — and so will one sitcom. 

ABC's "The Conners" will be doing a live episode at 8 p.m. ET that uses the results from the New Hampshire primary as part of the episode.

The show touches on politics-adjacent topics, including the challenges that middle class families face. It was spun off from "Roseanne" after Roseanne Barr was fired over racist remarks.

Few TV shows have tried such a stunt, but a 1997 episode of "ER" comes to mind, which was live and incorporated a playoff game between the Chicago Cubs and the Houston Astros.

Yang greets his supporters

Democratic presidential candidate Andrew Yang greets supporters in front of a polling station on Feb. 11, 2020 in Keene, N.H.Justin Sullivan / Getty Images

Most voters think Trump will win re-election, new poll finds

Two-thirds of voters believe that President Trump will be re-elected in November, according to a Monmouth University poll released Tuesday. Of those, 27 percent said they think Trump will "definitely" be re-elected, while 39 percent said they feel he will "probably" win again.

The poll also finds that just 11 percent of registered Democrats say their party's eventual nominee will "definitely" beat Trump, while 38 percent said "it is more likely than not" that Trump will win. 

In the Democratic primary race, the poll shows a new front-runner, with Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders leading the field at 26 percent support among Democratic and lean-Democratic voters — up from 23 percent in the last national Monmouth University poll, taken before the Iowa caucuses. Former Vice President Joe Biden fell to 16 percent support in this poll — in January he was at 30 percent. 

Read more here.