EVENT ENDED

2020 New Hampshire Democratic Primary: Sanders victorious

Check out the latest results and analysis from NBC News.
Image: The New Hampshire primary will be held on Tues., Feb. 11, 2020.
The New Hampshire primary will be held on Tues., Feb. 11, 2020.Chelsea Stahl / NBC News

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Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., on Tuesday claimed victory in the New Hampshire primary, the second Democratic contest of the 2020 election.

All eyes were on New Hampshire after last week's chaotic Iowa caucuses, where problems with the app used for reporting results delayed the outcome for days.

Read below for the latest updates or see the full results here.

Highlights from the New Hampshire primary:

Download the NBC News app for full coverage and alerts on the latest news.

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NBC News Exit Poll: New Hampshire Democrats disagree on whether some candidates are 'too liberal'

New Hampshire Democratic primary voters find some candidates too liberal and others not liberal enough, according to the NBC News Exit Poll. 

The poll found that half of those voting in New Hampshire Tuesday felt that Bernie Sanders is too liberal, and 4 in 10 say the same about Elizabeth Warren. On the other side of the ideological spectrum, 4 in 10 say Joe Biden’s issue positions are not liberal enough, and 2 in 10 say the same about Pete Buttigieg. 

In terms of the candidate who seems to be most in line with voters ideologically, Buttigieg comes out on top — 67 percent say his positions on the issues are about right. Less than half say the same for Biden, Warren or Sanders. 

NBC News Exit Poll: New Hampshire Democrats divided on return to Obama-era policies

New Hampshire Democratic primary voters are divided on the direction the party should take, according to the NBC News Exit Poll. 

Forty percent of Democratic voters want a return to the policies of President Barack Obama, while 38 percent want more liberal policies. And 12 percent would like to see more conservative policies than during Obama’s tenure.

According to the exit poll, 61 percent of New Hampshire Democratic primary voters describe themselves as liberal, which is comparable to prior primaries — slightly higher than in 2008 (56 percent) but slightly lower than in 2016 (68 percent).

 

NBC News Exit Poll: Moderate Republicans on the decline in New Hampshire GOP primary

Moderate Republicans have staged a disappearing act in New Hampshire's presidential primary, early results from the NBC News Exit Poll show.

Just 19 percent of voters in Tuesday's GOP primary consider themselves moderate or liberal. That’s down sharply from just four years ago, when 29 percent fell into these categories. And it’s a dramatic decline from 2012, when nearly half of those voting in the Republican primary consisted of moderates and liberals.

NBC News Exit Poll: No jump in independents or first-time voters in New Hampshire Democratic primary

There was no jump in independents or first-time voters in Tuesday's New Hampshire Democratic primary, according to early results from the NBC News Exit Poll. 

There was an expectation that the number of independents participating in this year’s Democratic primary might be higher than previous years, since the Republican contest is not competitive. That does not seem to have happened: 43 percent of primary voters report being registered as undeclared on the voter rolls, which is in line with prior Democratic contests when there were also hotly contested Republican races.

 

The NBC News Exit Poll also found that 12 percent of voters in the New Hampshire Democratic contest are voting in their first presidential primary, down slightly from four years ago. 

New Hampshire exit polls: Defeating Trump tops issues for Democratic voters

By a nearly two-to-one margin, New Hampshire voters who cast ballots in Tuesday's Democratic primary said they would rather see a nominee who can beat President Donald Trump in November than one who agrees with them on the issues, according to early data from an NBC News exit poll.

Sixty-two percent of respondents said would rather see a nominee who can beat Trump while 34 percent said that they would prefer one who agrees with them on major issues if they had to choose between the two options.

New Hampshire voters in both parties agree that Trump has emerged from impeachment largely unscathed, the early exit poll data showed.

Read more about the results.

NBC News Exit Poll: New Hampshire Democratic voters more likely to be female, college graduates

Voters in Tuesday’s New Hampshire Democratic presidential primary are more likely to be female and college graduates than those voting on the Republican side, early results from the NBC News Exit Poll show.

  • About a third of GOP primary voters are college graduates, a share that jumps to 55 percent on the Democratic side.
  • Women make up 44 percent of those voting in the Republican primary, but they account for 55 percent of those voting in the Democratic primary.
  • Compared to Democrats, Republican voters are more than twice as likely to be military veterans.

All of these differences mirror the demographics of Democratic and Republican supporters across the U.S.       

Warren campaign outlines post-N.H. path in memo

Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s campaign has released a memo that outlines her path after New Hampshire, saying that the road to the Democratic presidential nomination does not rely on “statewide winner-take-all victories.”

In a lengthy memo released Tuesday afternoon, Warren campaign manager Roger Lau laid out the campaign’s strategy going forward, and the flaws in her opponent — something the candidate herself has shied away from on the trail as she makes a “unity” pitch.

The memo relies heavily on the idea that “the early states deliver mixed results for the field” and “no seismic event” shakes up the top three, assuming that the last three viable candidates in the race as of Super Tuesday will be Biden, Sanders and Warren.

“The road to the Democratic nomination is not paved with statewide winner-take-all victories,” Lau wrote in the memo, which was sent to supporters. “This is a district-by-district contest for pledged delegates awarded proportionally.”

“It's not a straightforward narrative captured by glancing at a map, and the process won't be decided by the simple horse race numbers in clickbait headlines. That's never been our focus — our focus is on building a broad coalition to win delegates everywhere,” Lau wrote.

In the latest RealClearPolitics New Hampshire polling average, Warren (with 11 percent), is trailing Sanders (28.7 percent), Buttigieg (21.3 percent) and Klobuchar (11.7 percent.

Lau, nevertheless, goes on to say that, “We're confident in our plan and our path because we know the truth at the heart of the nomination process.”

“No amount of spin and hyperventilation can change the delegate math, and no amount of money can buy a candidate his way back into this race if he can't play for serious delegates on Super Tuesday,” Lau wrote. 

 

Democrats battle for critical New Hampshire vote as polls set to close soon

With polls closing here shortly, Democratic candidates spent the day of New Hampshire's first-in-the-nation primary on Tuesday talking up their candidacies and taking aim at a rival who isn't even on the ballot here — former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg.

Entering primary day, Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., was comfortably leading in the polls, trailed by former South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg. Behind them was a three-way battle for third place between a surging Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., and former Vice President Joe Biden.

The vote came as last week's Iowa caucus results were being contested. Both Sanders and Buttigieg have claimed victory in the Hawkeye State.

Read the story.