EVENT ENDED

2020 New Hampshire Democratic Primary: Sanders victorious

Check out the latest results and analysis from NBC News.
Image: The New Hampshire primary will be held on Tues., Feb. 11, 2020.
The New Hampshire primary will be held on Tues., Feb. 11, 2020.Chelsea Stahl / NBC News

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Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., on Tuesday claimed victory in the New Hampshire primary, the second Democratic contest of the 2020 election.

All eyes were on New Hampshire after last week's chaotic Iowa caucuses, where problems with the app used for reporting results delayed the outcome for days.

Read below for the latest updates or see the full results here.

Highlights from the New Hampshire primary:

Download the NBC News app for full coverage and alerts on the latest news.

Live Blog

As Democrats battle in early states, Bloomberg quietly lays groundwork among party leaders

WASHINGTON — Michael Bloomberg may be absent from the early-state ballots, but behind the scenes, he has been using his wealth and influence to undermine the rest of the Democratic field.

As the other candidates for the Democratic presidential nomination trudged through Iowa and New Hampshire in the early weeks of this year, Bloomberg, the former mayor of New York, has doubled his planned spending on television ads, expanded his staff several times over and started aggressively courting key party influencers — including many who have endorsed top rivals like former Vice President Joe Biden.

Bloomberg could escalate his efforts even more directly after the results of Tuesday's New Hampshire primary are in and as candidates, party insiders and voters begin to reassess the state of the race.

Read more about Bloomberg's strategy here.

NBC News Exit Poll: Sanders leads with New Hampshire liberals; moderates support Klobuchar and Buttigieg

Bernie Sanders is ahead in Tuesday’s New Hampshire Democratic presidential primary largely on a wave of support he’s receiving from liberal voters, according to the NBC News Exit Poll.

Sanders leads with 33 percent of the vote among self-described liberals, followed by Pete Buttigieg and Amy Klobuchar. Elizabeth Warren, who had banked on a strong showing with liberals, is in fourth place with liberals at just 12 percent.

Among moderate and conservative voters, Klobuchar and Buttigieg are virtually tied, with Sanders further behind, followed by Joe Biden. 

Exit poll results indicate that liberals made up roughly 6 in 10 voters in the Democratic primary today. 

Biden, Warren won't pick up delegates — but she vows to push on

Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, whose next-door-neighbor-state advantage had once been expected to help boost her prospects in the New Hampshire Democratic primary, won't receive any delegates Tuesday night, according to NBC News. 

Candidates must meet a threshold of 15 percent in the state's two congressional districts or statewide to win delegates. Joe Biden won't reach that threshold either, according to NBC News. 

With 30 percent of the state's precincts reporting, Warren had 9.6 percent of the vote — and was running far behind Bernie Sanders, Pete Buttigieg and Amy Klobuchar.

Warren, nevertheless, addressed supporters shortly after polls closed, and signaled that the Democratic primary fight would be long, that there would be a need to unite the party and that she could be the one to do it.

“We still have 98 percent of our delegates up for grabs … and Americans in every part of the country are going to make their voices heard,” Warren said.

“The fight between factions in our party has taken a sharp turn in recent weeks,” she said, adding that, “We will need a nominee that the broadest coalition of our party feels like they can get behind.”

“We cannot afford to fall into factions,” she continued. “We win when we come together,” Warren said, echoing the unity message she’s pushed on the campaign trail in recent weeks.

"Our campaign is built for the long haul," she said later. "And we're just getting started."

Anticipating a poor showing, Biden had already left New Hampshire for South Carolina, the site of the next primary. 

Spirits are high at Bernie HQ tonight

Bernie Sanders' campaign is feeling a mix of anxious and excited, a feeling that gets stronger depending on how senior the advisor is you’re talking to. 

There are only a few hundred people at the most standing around on the floor or seated in bleachers. There very well may be more press here on the three-story media riser and sitting at surrounding tables than in the crowd around the podium. 

As polls closed at 8:00 pm, the crowd began a countdown of "5, 4, 3, 2, 1," before chanting "Bernie, Bernie!" 

There have been sporadic cheers from the crowd, when the television displays a favorable exit poll or updated results. The campaign playlist has been playing on repeat for a few hours now.

In Iowa, the campaign had a cash bar flowing with local Iowa brews at their Caucus night party. None of that here- just candy, pizza and popcorn.

 

NBC News Exit Poll: Income divides Sanders and Buttigieg supporters in New Hampshire primary

Bernie Sanders was the top choice among the quarter of New Hampshire Democratic primary voters whose families earn less than $50,000 per year, the NBC News Exit Poll found. Following Sanders, those voters picked Pete Buttigieg, Joe Biden, Elizabeth Warren and Amy Klobuchar. 

Among the 4 in 10 Democratic voters whose families earn more than $100,000 per year, Buttigieg led the pack, followed by Klobuchar, Sanders, Warren and Biden. 

Colorado Sen. Michael Bennet exits 2020 race

Sen. Michael Bennet, D-Colo., is ending his presidential campaign, sources tell NBC News.

Bennet entered the race last May, centered his campaign on issues of reforming democracy, tackling climate change and expanding on the Affordable Care Act with a public option.

Despite jumping into the race later than many of the other Democratic presidential hopefuls, Bennet announced that he was going all in on New Hampshire toward the end of 2019, committing to and completing 50 town halls in the state in the final weeks before the primary.

"I think New Hampshire really is in a position to make a difference here," Bennet had told a house party audience in Brentwood, New Hampshire, following the chaos of last week's Iowa caucuses. "You don't have to accept anybody else's conventional wisdom. The muddle in Iowa creates an opportunity for you to apply your own views here."

Read more here.

NBC News Exit Poll: Recent debate was a major factor in support for Klobuchar, Buttigieg and Sanders

Half of New Hampshire Democratic primary voters waited until the final days of the campaign to settle on a candidate, and last Friday night’s debate played a major role in helping many of them come to their decision, according to the NBC News Exit Poll. Fifteen percent of Democratic primary voters said the debate was the most important factor in their vote, and another 34 percent said it was among several important factors. 

Among those who decided in the last few days, 28 percent picked Pete Buttigieg, 23 percent chose Amy Klobuchar and 16 percent voted for Bernie Sanders.

Klobuchar seemed to get a particular bump from her debate performance. Among those who said that the debate was an important factor in their final decision, the breakdown was 30 percent for Klobuchar, 22 percent for Buttigieg and 20 percent Sanders.

NBC News Exit Poll: Sanders leads among voters who care more about issues than beating Trump

Bernie Sanders is the clear favorite among New Hampshire Democratic primary voters who are prioritizing a candidate with whom they agree on major issues, according to results from the NBC News Exit Poll.

But among the majority who care more about beating President Donald Trump than nominating a candidate who matches their views, the vote is split more evenly among Pete Buttigieg, Amy Klobuchar and Sanders. As polls closed, NBC News characterized the race as too early to call, with these three candidates vying for first place and Sanders leading.

Roughly 6 in 10 New Hampshire Democrats prioritize nominating a candidate who can beat Donald Trump; among these voters, Buttigieg leads, followed by Klobuchar and Sanders. 

About a third of Granite State Democrats prefer a candidate who shares their views on major issues. Support for Sanders is strongest among this group, followed by Buttigieg and Klobuchar.

Andrew Yang drops out of presidential race

Andrew Yang, a New York businessman whose unusual presidential campaign rose to prominence with a plan to give Americans $1,000 a month, is dropping out of the Democratic race.

Initially seen as a longshot candidate, Yang used a savvy social media strategy to garner legions of devoted followers who referred to themselves as the "Yang Gang."

A lawyer turned entrepreneur and author of a book called "The War on Normal People," Yang appealed to voters by warning of the ills of technology— including automation and artificial intelligence. Yang's plan for a universal basic income— the $1,000 a month check that he dubbed the "Freedom Dividend"— served as a bedrock for his larger vision for fixing a society deeply sickened by capitalism.

"Democrats still have not asked themselves the hard questions as to how Donald Trump won in 2016," Yang said in December. The party is acting like "Trump is the cause of all our problems. He’s a symptom and we need to cure the underlying disease."

Read more about Yang's rise and fall here.

Paul Ryan says he thinks Biden could beat Trump, but unlikely to win nomination

Former House Speaker Paul Ryan said Tuesday that of the Democratic presidential candidates, he thinks former Vice President Joe Biden would have the best chance to beat President Donald Trump in November, but the Wisconsin Republican predicted Biden would lose the nomination fight to a progressive candidate, CNBC's Natasha Turak reported Tuesday.

“I’d say he’s probably the most likely one to have a chance at beating Donald Trump, but I don’t see Joe getting the nomination, I just don’t see him getting there. I think it’s going be one of these progressives, which I think will be  much easier to beat,” Ryan told CNBC at the annual Milken Conference in Abu Dhabi.

The former Wisconsin congressman and vice-presidential candidate said the eventual nominee would have to battle with Trump over the key states of Wisconsin, Michigan and Pennsylvania, and “I think Joe is probably the hardest to beat, because it’s going to come down to the suburban (voter), it’s going to be the suburbanite that’ll basically be the difference-maker."

Those voters, whom he described as typically right-leaning, white collar workers and first-generation Republicans, "like Trump the idea, they like Trump the disruption — they don’t necessarily like the  personality and the noise and the tweets that come with it,” Ryan told CNBC.

“So they’ll be tempted to vote for what they think is a safe moderate — and I think Joe Biden, it’s all relative, will fall into that category, and is the likeliest to be able to win that voter,” but only if he were able to win the nomination, Ryan said.

NBC News Exit Poll: Most New Hampshire Democrats say nominee's gender doesn't matter in race against Trump

When asked whether a female Democratic presidential nominee would be a plus or a minus in the general election battle against President Donald Trump, most New Hampshire primary voters say it doesn’t matter either way.

According to the NBC News Exit Poll, 58 percent of Democratic voters said nominating a woman would make no difference in the party's effort to defeat Trump. Among the remainder, though, more say a female nominee would have a harder time, rather than an easier time, beating Trump. 

Women voters (34 percent) are more likely than men (26 percent) to believe that nominating a woman would actually make it harder for the Democrat to win in November.