EVENT ENDED

2020 New Hampshire Democratic Primary: Sanders victorious

Check out the latest results and analysis from NBC News.
Image: The New Hampshire primary will be held on Tues., Feb. 11, 2020.
The New Hampshire primary will be held on Tues., Feb. 11, 2020.Chelsea Stahl / NBC News

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Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., on Tuesday claimed victory in the New Hampshire primary, the second Democratic contest of the 2020 election.

All eyes were on New Hampshire after last week's chaotic Iowa caucuses, where problems with the app used for reporting results delayed the outcome for days.

Read below for the latest updates or see the full results here.

Highlights from the New Hampshire primary:

Download the NBC News app for full coverage and alerts on the latest news.

Live Blog

'Hello, America!': Klobuchar speaks as results have her poised for strong finish

Sen. Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota addressed the nation on Tuesday as the partial results from New Hampshire's showed her surprisingly strong performance in the state.

With 65 percent of the vote in, Klobuchar had 20 percent of the voting, trailing only Bernie Sanders, who had 26.3 percent, and Pete Buttigieg, who had 24 percent. She was leading both a fellow senator, Elizabeth Warren, and Joe Biden. 

“Hello America, I’m Amy Klobuchar and I will beat Donald Trump,” she told a cheering crowd of supporters. “My heart is full tonight. While there are still ballots to count. We have beaten the odds every step of the way.”

The Minnesota senator had been trailing behind her party’s front-runners in polls for months.

“Tonight in New Hampshire, as everyone had counted us out, even a week ago — thank you pundits — I came back and we delivered,” she told her crowd. “I never give up, but my story is nothing compared to the resilience that I have seen all over this country.”

NBC News Exit Poll: Warren falters with New Hampshire liberals and college-educated women

Elizabeth Warren rode atop the polls last fall with a call for “big, structural change” backed up by specific plans to attain that change.

But in Tuesday's New Hampshire Democratic primary, among voters who said they were looking for a change agent, she earned only 12 percent of the vote. That put her in a virtual tie for third place with Amy Klobuchar, behind both Bernie Sanders and Pete Buttigieg.

Warren had a similarly disappointing performance among voters in her liberal base, behind not only Sanders but also the more moderate Buttigieg and Klobuchar. 

And among women with a college degree, Klobuchar came out on top, with 29 percent. Warren’s 12 percent also trailed Buttigieg (24 percent) and Sanders (21 percent).

How a crowded field could help Bernie Sanders

Andrew Yang's run is over, but its significance for Asian Americans will linger, experts say

After tech entrepreneur Andrew Yang ended his Democratic presidential campaign on Tuesday night, many experts said his run was a culturally significant moment for Asian Americans.

Yang, who made history as the first Asian American man to run for president as a Democrat, dropped out after a poor performance in the New Hampshire primary. While Yang largely shied away from “identity politics,” claiming it was divisive, his heritage was a frequent topic of conversation on the campaign trail, particularly given the underrepresentation of Asian Americans in politics.

“The Yang campaign is significant even if it's over,” Anthony Ocampo, a sociologist who focuses on race, immigration and LGBTQ issues, told NBC News. “The optics of an Asian American candidate commanding such widespread support, both in rallies and on social media, signals to aspiring Asian American politicians that there is a pathway for them — that they can legitimately aim for the highest office in the nation.”

Read more about Yang's trailblazing campaign.

Biden, facing poor finish in N.H., doubles down on S.C., Nevada efforts: 'It ain't over, man'

Former Vice President Joe Biden, speaking to supporters in South Carolina as results coming in from New Hampshire showed him having a bad night, vowed to stay in the race and doubled down on his strategy to focus on the more diverse states of South Carolina and Nevada.

“It ain’t over man, we’re just getting started,” Biden told supporters in Columbia, S.C. “We’re not going to let anyone take this election from me.”

Biden — who, with 50 percent of the vote in New Hampshire in, had just 8.6 percent support — downplayed the evening’s results, saying that only two states had voted so far.

“Tonight we’ve just heard from two states … not all of the nation, not half of the nation, not a quarter, not 10 percent, two,” Biden said, referring to Iowa and New Hampshire. “Where I come from, that’s the opening bell.”

“I want you to all think of a number: 99.9 percent,” Biden continued. “That’s the percentage of African  American voters who have not had a chance to vote yet.

“One more number — 99.8. That’s the number of Latino voters who haven’t had a chance to vote,” added Biden, who has repeatedly talked about his strategy to rely on African American support in South Carolina and Latino support in Nevada.

NBC News Exit Poll: Biden underperforms among voters who care most about beating Trump

Joe Biden has campaigned as a candidate who champions working-class values and can beat President Donald Trump. But those appeals appeared to fizzle in New Hampshire, according to the NBC News Exit Poll. 

Six in 10 Democratic primary voters said that supporting a nominee who could beat Trump was their top priority. But Biden got only 11 percent of this group’s vote, trailing Pete Buttigieg, Bernie Sanders and Amy Klobuchar. 

Biden also came in fourth among voters without a college degree and fourth among Democrats with annual family incomes under $50,000. 

Trump mocks Warren, Steyer as results trickle in

NBC News Exit Poll: New Hampshire Democrats who want a change-maker choose Sanders

Voters in Tuesday's New Hampshire Democratic primary were divided between wanting a presidential candidate who can bring about needed change (36 percent) and one who can unite the country (32 percent), according to the NBC News Exit Poll. Another 22 percent were looking for a candidate who cares about people like them and 7 percent wanted a “fighter.”  

Among those looking for a change candidate, 38 percent cast their ballots for Bernie Sanders, and Pete Buttigieg placed a distant second.

Among those looking for a unifying candidate, Amy Klobuchar and Buttigieg were the top picks.

As Democrats battle in early states, Bloomberg quietly lays groundwork among party leaders

WASHINGTON — Michael Bloomberg may be absent from the early-state ballots, but behind the scenes, he has been using his wealth and influence to undermine the rest of the Democratic field.

As the other candidates for the Democratic presidential nomination trudged through Iowa and New Hampshire in the early weeks of this year, Bloomberg, the former mayor of New York, has doubled his planned spending on television ads, expanded his staff several times over and started aggressively courting key party influencers — including many who have endorsed top rivals like former Vice President Joe Biden.

Bloomberg could escalate his efforts even more directly after the results of Tuesday's New Hampshire primary are in and as candidates, party insiders and voters begin to reassess the state of the race.

Read more about Bloomberg's strategy here.

NBC News Exit Poll: Sanders leads with New Hampshire liberals; moderates support Klobuchar and Buttigieg

Bernie Sanders is ahead in Tuesday’s New Hampshire Democratic presidential primary largely on a wave of support he’s receiving from liberal voters, according to the NBC News Exit Poll.

Sanders leads with 33 percent of the vote among self-described liberals, followed by Pete Buttigieg and Amy Klobuchar. Elizabeth Warren, who had banked on a strong showing with liberals, is in fourth place with liberals at just 12 percent.

Among moderate and conservative voters, Klobuchar and Buttigieg are virtually tied, with Sanders further behind, followed by Joe Biden. 

Exit poll results indicate that liberals made up roughly 6 in 10 voters in the Democratic primary today.