EVENT ENDED

Democratic Debate live updates: MSNBC/Washington Post host

With impeachment at center stage, Democrats debated their visions to replace Trump.

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NBC News' live blog tracked the fifth Democratic primary debate of the 2020 presidential election cycle, co-hosted by MSNBC and The Washington Post.

With the impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump taking center stage,the 2020 candidates clashed over their visions to replace him. South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg escaped unscathed after it was expected he'd draw heavy fire as the newly minted front-runner, while former Vice President Joe Biden stumbled with gaffes on women, marijuana and race.

Catch up quickly via our analysis and fact checks, and get a look at who came out swinging via our attack tracker. Or, see how the night unfolded below.

Live Blog

Booker and Harris pause for a selfie

The student debt crisis and what Democratic candidates propose doing about it

Student debt has surged in recent years and now stands at over $1.6 trillion.

Some Democrat candidates are proposing tuition-free public college and canceling student debt, while others are offering more limited benefits. Critics say many of the initiatives would benefit disproportionately better-off Americans.

What the candidates (including Trump) are proposing.

Dance dance, revolution?

Buttigieg is proving once and for all that "Boomer" isn't just a generation, it's a state of mind.

Videos have flown around the internet in recent days featuring a choreographed dance being performed by his supporters. It’s set to “High Hopes” by Panic! At the Disco. 

The dance has also triggered something of a backlash on the teen-heavy TikTok, where young politicos are using it to critique Buttigieg’s centrist positions.

Viewer discretion advised.

Debate-goers are submitting their Election Confessions

Ahead of the debate, people submitted their confessions about the 2020 candidates live from Atlanta. See the most recent confessions and share your own.

As the Democratic debate draws attention to Georgia, Stacey Abrams fights for voters' rights

Stacey Abrams won't be on the debate stage when the Democratic presidential candidates face off in Atlanta on Wednesday, but that doesn't mean she won't be playing a role in the 2020 elections.

Since Abrams' loss to Republican Brian Kemp in the Georgia governor's race last year, she's worked to combat voter suppression, which Abrams alleges cost her the race. Ahead of the presidential election next year, Abrams is using her political action committee, Fair Fight, to repair what she believes to be a broken voting system in her state.

"My reaction to the mismanagement and the malfeasance was to think about what could I do, not simply about my election, because that was over, but what work could I still do that would address the challenges that so many Georgians faced in that process?" Abrams told NBC News.

Yang says he misses Beto

College students join NBC News to help produce debate

A group of students from Georgia State University in Atlanta joined NBC News to help produce Wednesday night's Democratic debate by standing in at the podiums and even debated each other on some of the top issues.Caitlin Fichtel / NBC News

A group of 35 students from Georgia State University in Atlanta joined NBC News to help produce Wednesday night's Democratic debate.

Each student was selected by their professors to apply for the opportunity and underwent an interview process with both their professors and NBC.

The students, a mix of undergraduate and graduate students, were selected to portray candidate stand-ins during rehearsals, hand out credentials, and work behind the scenes to help NBC put on the broadcast.

David Howell, a junior journalism major and political science minor was tasked with playing Joe Biden during rehearsals. He said that he made sure to heavily prepare for the role beforehand,

"I did all sorts of research, the majority came from watching videos [of Biden in] prior debates and reading Twitter posts where he talked about policy," he said.

Kyle Smith, a graduate student working towards a master's of art and communication with a focus in digital media strategies, has been assisting with handing out credentials to members of the media. He said that he jumped at the experience due to the importance of the upcoming election.

"This is a huge election because our voice matters. We need numbers in order to make change happen in Georgia, which is primarily a red state," he said.

Noorma Ckhoul, a senior majoring in journalism with a political science minor, played one of the moderators.

She said that while "none of us really knew what we were getting into,” the students ended up getting valuable public speaking and communications experience.

Ada Wood, a junior journalism major, said she was thrilled to have been selected to participate.

"I learned a lot about what it really takes to put on an event this big," she said. "All the hands and the people involved. All the technology."

Sanders shoots hoops ahead of debate

Julián Castro, ineligible for Democratic debate, stays visible in Atlanta neighborhood

ATLANTA — Even though he would not be onstage at the Democratic debate in Atlanta on Wednesday night, presidential candidate Julián Castro spent the morning in the city anyway touring a neighborhood founded by slaves whose residents are now fighting gentrification.

Castro, the former Housing and Urban Development secretary under President Barack Obama, toured the neighborhood, named Pittsburgh, that was founded in 1883, making it one of the oldest in the city and where many of the neighborhood's residents have lived for decades.

Although he joked he had gone to the neighborhood because that's where the media was, Castro said his visit was a continuation of what his campaign has been about.

"From the very beginning of this campaign, I've spoken out for the most marginalized, the people that have been forgotten, for the poor and not only the middle class, but people who are poor in this country and spoken out to make sure everyone can succeed, a country where everyone counts," Castro said. "And so we're going to go where we have the opportunity to deliver that message."

Full story here.

Why Buttigieg is struggling with black voters

Buttigieg may have won over many members of the mostly white political commentariat in New York and Washington, and recent polls of Iowa’s overwhelmingly white electorate put him at or near the front of the crowded Democratic field there. But, at the start of October, a poll in The Charleston Post and Courier found Buttigieg had no black voter support in the state and just 4 percent support overall.

That has left two questions generating a stream of television commentary, social media memes and heated disputes. How much of Buttigieg’s difficulty with black voters, and in many cases religious voters, is because of his sexuality? And, given that black voters make up about 20 percent of the Democratic Party’s base nationwide, why is he still considered a serious contender for the nomination when he doesn’t have black voters’ support?

Read more about why black voters aren't sold on Mayor Pete.