2020 Primary Calendar

A summary of 23 primary elections from February 2020 to June 2020. Includes historical data about the 2016 election to see who won delegates from each party.

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Date of RaceDelegation Name
Total Number of Democratic Delegates
2016 Democratic Winner
Total Number of Republican Delegates
2016 Republican Winner
February 3, 2020
Iowa caucuses
41
Clinton
40
Cruz
February 11, 2020
New Hampshire primaries
24
Sanders
22
Trump
February 22, 2020
Nevada Democratic caucuses
36
Clinton
February 29, 2020
South Carolina Democratic primary
54
Clinton
March 3, 2020
Alabama primaries
52
Clinton
50
Trump
March 3, 2020
American Samoa Democratic caucuses
6
Clinton
March 3, 2020
Arkansas primaries
31
Clinton
40
Trump
March 3, 2020
California primaries
415
Clinton
172
Trump
March 3, 2020
Colorado primaries
67
Sanders
37
Cruz
March 3, 2020
Maine primaries
24
Sanders
22
Cruz
March 3, 2020
Massachusetts primaries
91
Clinton
41
Trump
March 3, 2020
Minnesota primaries
75
Sanders
39
Rubio
March 3, 2020
North Carolina primaries
110
Clinton
71
Trump
March 3, 2020
Oklahoma primaries
37
Sanders
43
Cruz
March 3, 2020
Tennessee primaries
64
Clinton
58
Trump
March 3, 2020
Texas primaries
228
Clinton
155
Cruz
March 3, 2020
Utah primaries
29
Sanders
40
Cruz
March 3, 2020
Virginia Democratic primary
99
Clinton
March 3, 2020
Vermont primaries
16
Sanders
17
Trump
March 3-10, 2020
Democrats Abroad primary
13
Sanders
March 8, 2020
Puerto Rico Republican Primary
23
Rubio
March 10, 2020
Hawaii Republican caucuses
19
Trump
March 10, 2020
Idaho primaries
20
Sanders
32
Cruz
March 10, 2020
Michigan primaries
125
Sanders
73
Trump
March 10, 2020
Mississippi primaries
36
Clinton
39
Trump
March 10, 2020
Missouri primaries
68
Clinton
54
Trump
March 10, 2020
North Dakota Democratic caucuses
14
Sanders
March 10, 2020
Washington primaries
89
Sanders
44
Trump
March 12, 2020
Virgin Islands Republican caucuses
9
Trump
March 14, 2020
D.C. Republican caucuses
19
Rubio
March 14, 2020
Guam Republican territorial Convention
9
Trump
March 14, 2020
Northern Marianas Democratic Convention
6
Clinton
March 14, 2020
Wyoming Republican caucuses
29
Cruz
March 17, 2020
Arizona Democratic Primary
67
Clinton
March 17, 2020
Florida primaries
219
Clinton
122
Trump
March 17, 2020
Illinois primaries
155
Clinton
67
Trump
March 17, 2020
Northern Marianas Republican caucuses
9
Trump
March 17, 2020
Ohio primaries
136
Clinton
82
Kasich
March 24, 2020
American Samoa Republican caucuses
9
Trump
March 24, 2020
Georgia primaries
105
Clinton
76
Trump
March 29, 2020
Puerto Rico Democratic primary
51
Clinton
April 3, 2020
North Dakota Republican caucuses
29
Trump
April 4, 2020
Alaska Democratic primary
15
Sanders
April 4, 2020
Hawaii Democratic primary
24
Sanders
April 4, 2020
Louisiana primaries
54
Clinton
46
Trump
April 4, 2020
Wyoming Democratic caucuses
14
Sanders
April 7, 2020
Wisconsin primaries
84
Sanders
52
Cruz
April 28, 2020
Connecticut primaries
60
Clinton
28
Trump
April 28, 2020
Delaware primaries
21
Clinton
16
Trump
April 28, 2020
Maryland primaries
96
Clinton
38
Trump
April 28, 2020
New York primaries
274
Clinton
95
Trump
April 28, 2020
Pennsylvania primaries
186
Clinton
88
Trump
April 28, 2020
Rhode Island primaries
26
Sanders
19
Trump
May 2, 2020
Guam Democratic caucuses
7
Clinton
May 2, 2020
Kansas Democratic primary
39
Sanders
May 5, 2020
Indiana primaries
82
Sanders
58
Trump
May 12, 2020
Nebraska primaries
29
Sanders
36
Trump
May 12, 2020
West Virginia primaries
28
Sanders
34
Trump
May 19, 2020
Kentucky primaries
54
Clinton
46
Trump
May 19, 2020
Oregon primaries
61
Sanders
28
Trump
June 2, 2020
D.C. Democratic primary
20
Clinton
June 2, 2020
Montana primaries
19
Sanders
27
Trump
June 2, 2020
New Jersey primaries
126
Clinton
49
Trump
June 2, 2020
New Mexico primaries
34
Clinton
22
Trump
June 2, 2020
South Dakota primaries
16
Clinton
29
Trump
June 6, 2020
Virgin Islands Democratic caucuses
7
Clinton

What are pledged delegates, and how are they awarded?

On the Democratic side, delegates are awarded on a proportional basis according to the candidate’s share of support statewide and by congressional district. A candidate needs to receive at least 15 percent support in order to be awarded delegates. These delegates are known as pledged delegates and they are awarded based on the understanding that they will support a specific candidate at the convention.In the Republican Party, there are multiple approaches to awarding delegates to candidates, including proportional and winner-take-all. Under winner-take-all, the candidate receiving the most votes in a state's caucus or primary receives all of that state's delegates at the Republican National Convention. Many states award delegates separately based on results statewide and by congressional district and require thresholds candidates must reach in order to receive delegates.

In the Republican Party, there are multiple approaches to awarding delegates to candidates, including proportional and winner-take-all. Under winner-take-all, the candidate receiving the most votes in a state's caucus or primary receives all of that state's delegates at the Republican National Convention. Many states award delegates separately based on results statewide and by congressional district and require thresholds candidates must reach in order to receive delegates.

Superdelegates, and why NBC News has not included them here yet:

Superdelegates, also called automatic delegates, have an automatic seat at the Democratic National Convention and may vote for whomever they choose as the party’s presidential nominee. But under current Democratic National Committee rules, superdelegates will not be allowed to vote on the first ballot — a change from previous years. Superdelegates in 2020 can only vote if the outcome is already assured or if there is a deadlock after the first ballot.

Superdelegates, also considered unpledged delegates, include elected officials and party leaders. They make up around 16 percent of all Democratic Party delegates.

Republicans also have delegates who are party officials with an automatic seat at their national convention. However, these delegates make up only about 5 percent of the party’s delegates and are bound to vote for the candidate who won their state’s primary or caucus.

Unpledged delegates:

On the Democratic side, superdelegates are considered unpledged delegates since they are not obligated to vote for a particular candidate and may vote for whomever they wish. In other words, their vote is not “pledged” to a specific candidate for the party’s nomination. Most Republican delegates are considered “pledged” because they are bound to vote for the candidate who won their particular state’s primary or caucus. However, due to Republican Party rules in a few states, there are “unbound” delegates who can be considered “unpledged” because they are able to vote for whomever they choose at the Republican National Convention.

View 2020 Primary Calendar