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Another vaccinated member of Congress gets Covid

Rep. Ralph Norman contracted Covid just days after fellow South Carolina Republican Lindsey Graham, who was also vaccinated, tested positive.
Rep. Ralph Norman, R-S.C., and members of the House Freedom Caucus conduct a news conference outside the Capitol on Dec. 3, 2020.
Rep. Ralph Norman, R-S.C., and members of the House Freedom Caucus conduct a news conference outside the Capitol on Dec. 3, 2020.Tom Williams / CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images file

​​WASHINGTON — Rep. Ralph Norman, R-S.C., said Thursday that he has tested positive for the coronavirus despite being fully vaccinated.

“After experiencing minor symptoms this morning, I sought a Covid-19 test and was just informed the test results were positive,” Norman said in a tweet.

“Thankfully, I have been fully vaccinated and my symptoms remain mild,” he continued. “To every extent possible, I will continue my work virtually while in quarantine for the next ten (10) days.”

It’s unclear whether the 68-year-old lawmaker, who has served in the House since 2017, is back home in his district or still in Washington. The House left Capitol Hill last week for its annual August recess.

His infection adds to several breakthrough cases around Washington. Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham, who also represents South Carolina, said Monday that he also tested positive for Covid even after being fully vaccinated

"I feel like I have a sinus infection and at present time I have mild symptoms," said Graham, who is also in quarantine for 10 days.

Norman did not say whether he had interacted with Graham recently or how he might have contracted Covid.

Cases have been increasing across the country as the delta variant becomes the dominant coronavirus strain. They have been rising in South Carolina, where nearly 2,000 new cases were reported over the last week.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says that breakthrough cases are expected.

“No vaccines are 100 percent effective at preventing illness in vaccinated people,” the CDC says. “There will be a small percentage of fully vaccinated people who still get sick, are hospitalized, or die from COVID-19.”