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Jan. 8 Highlights: Pelosi calls for Trump's resignation or face impeachment, Twitter bans him

A growing number of lawmakers calling for removing or impeaching the president. House Speaker Pelosi also makes calls to prevent Trump from launching a nuclear strike.
Image: Navy circles show scenes from the mob at the Capitol, Joe Biden, Donald Trump and newspaper headlines.
Chelsea Stahl / NBC News

Democratic leaders in Congress will move on newly drafted articles of impeachment as soon as next week against President Donald Trump if he doesn't first resign, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said.

The news comes as Pelosi, D-Calif., reiterated her and presumptive Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer's, D-N.Y., demand in a letter to her caucus Friday afternoon that Vice President Mike Pence invoke the 25th Amendment to remove Trump from office before President-elect Joe Biden's inauguration.

Pelosi also said she spoke to Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman Mark Milley on Friday morning about preventing Trump from launching a nuclear strike. "The situation of this unhinged president could not be more dangerous, and we must do everything that we can to protect the American people from his unbalanced assault on our country and our democracy," she wrote.

This live coverage has ended.

Read the highlights:

— Twitter permanently suspends Trump's personal account.

— Read the full text of draft of new articles of impeachment against Trump.

— Trump says he won't attend Biden's inauguration.

— Clyburn says House should make Trump only president to be impeached twice.

— No evidence of antifa involvement in Capitol mob, FBI says.

— Troubled by Capitol riot, Cabinet officials DeVos, Chao resign.

No evidence of antifa involvement in Capitol mob, FBI says

Despite suggestions from conservative pundits and some Republican members of Congress, there is no evidence that anti-fascist activists were involved in the pro-Trump Capitol riots, FBI Assistant Director Steven D'Antuono said on a call with reporters Friday. 

"We have no indication of that, at this time,” D'Antuono said when asked whether antifa activists had disguised themselves as Trump supporters in an effort to frame them for the violent riots in which five people died, including Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick.

Immediately following the violence on Wednesday, conspiracy theorists, radical conservative activists and Trump allies took to social media and conservative news networks to make the evidence-free claim that antifa was behind the riots, reviving old rumors about anti-fascist activists long used in Trump campaign fundraising advertisements.

The false claims of antifa involvement in Wednesday’s melee spread early on social media from longtime Trump supporters, including televangelist Mark Burns and Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton. By evening, the rumors were being floated on Fox News and Fox Business Network by Sarah Palin and Rep. Mo Brooks, R-Ala. 

Late Wednesday evening, during the continuation of the certification, Rep. Matt Gaetz, R-Fla., also used his time to promote a poorly sourced and later-retracted report to claim antifa was “masquerading as Trump supporters.”

Democratic Sen. Patty Murray calls on Hawley, Cruz to resign

Sen. Patty Murray of Washington, the third-most senior Democrat in the Senate, is calling on Republican Sens. Josh Hawley and Ted Cruz to resign, accusing them of inciting Wednesday's riots at the Capitol.

"Any Senator who stands up and supports the power of force over the power of democracy has broken their oath of office," Murray said in a statement. "Senators Hawley and Cruz should resign."

Hawley, R-Mo., and Cruz, R-Texas, led an effort in the Senate to object to the certification of President-elect Joe Biden's victory in the Electoral College, leveling baseless and discredited claims of voter fraud that were encouraged by President Donald Trump.

The lawmakers, who are widely believed to be eyeing bids for the GOP presidential nomination in 2024, have been fiercely criticized this week for their roles in stoking the unrest that led to the deadly clashes in the nation's capital.

Photo: Capitol riots inspire graffiti in Syria

Ghaith Alsayed / AP
Syrian graffiti artist Aziz Al-Asmar, at left in top photo, creates an image Friday inspired by this photo of a rioter carrying a lectern in the U.S. Capitol, on the wall of a house destroyed in an airstrike in Binish, Idlib province, Syria.Win McNamee / Getty Images

W. Va. GOP lawmaker charged after videoing himself rioting inside Capitol

A West Virginia Republican legislator who recorded and then deleted a video of himself storming the U.S. Capitol with a mob has been charged in connection with Wednesday's riots.

Del. Derrick Evans, a Republican West Virginia state representative, was charged Friday, NBC News confirmed.

Despite coming under mounting pressure to resign, Evans has refused to do so.

Nearly 32,000 people signed a Change.org petition demanding that Evans step down.

Evans livestreamed a video on his Facebook page Wednesday afternoon outside the Capitol as rioters who support President Trump pushed against a police barricade.

"Bring the tear gas. We don't care," Evans is heard yelling. "We're taking this country back whether you like it or not. Today's a test run. We're taking this country back."

At another point, he's heard asking, "Where's the Proud Boys?" referring to the far-right, all-male, self-described group of "Western chauvinists."

Man with foot up on desk in Pelosi's office at Capitol arrested

WASHINGTON — A man photographed casually sitting with his foot on a desk in House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's office at the U.S. Capitol while a pro-Trump mob rampaged the halls of Congress was arrested Friday, law enforcement officials said.

Richard Barnett, 60, of Gravette, Arkansas, was taken into custody in his home state on charges of entering and remaining on restricted grounds, violent entry and theft of public property. Further details were not immediately available.

Apparent images of Barnett were splashed across social media as the deadly mayhem unfolded in the nation's capital on Wednesday, just as Democratic and Republican lawmakers convened to count the Electoral College votes

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At least two Dems in Congress say rioters stole computers

At least three Democrats in Congress said that the pro-Trump rioters who stormed the Capitol on Wednesday stole computers from their offices, raising cybersecurity concerns.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., had a laptop stolen, as did Sen. Jeff Merkley, D-Ore., who tweeted about the theft. 

It wasn't immediately clear what protections were on those devices, though Congress generally lags behind the federal government in implementing cybersecurity measures. Not all Senate computers automatically encrypt their hard drives or require a password to log in if they're unused for a few minutes. Emails were visible on a desktop computer left running in Pelosi's office.

While experts say most congressional laptops shouldn't provide easy access to classified material, both the Senate and House connect to a centralized email server, and staffers' computers likely contain months or years of emails and other sensitive material.

“There’s a very good chance that a lot of sensitive and possibly secret information could have been leaked by those people being in there and taking stuff,” said Lou Rabon, the CEO of Cyber Defense Group, a cybersecurity consultancy based in Los Angeles.