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Boehner: GOP Still 'Building Consensus' on Obamacare Alternative

Image: Speaker Boehner Holds His Weekly News Conference
WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 10: U.S. Speaker of the House John Bohener (R-OH) answers questions during his weekly news conference on Capitol Hill, April 10, 2014 in Washington, DC. Speaker Boehner said the Obama administration is still hiding the truth about the IRS scandal and the 2012 Benghazi attack on the American diplomatic mission. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)Drew Angerer / Getty Images

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House Speaker John Boehner says Republicans are still “building a consensus” about an alternative to the Affordable Care Act passed in 2010.

Asked by NBC News when House Republicans might unveil the long-awaited substitute, Boehner replied: “We’re building a consensus, we’ll see.”

Many of Boehner’s fellow Republicans have been calling for leaders to move a bill on the floor in advance of the looming midterm elections. While the GOP is largely running against Democratic candidates by highlighting rivals’ support for the president’s signature –- but still unpopular -- legislative achievement, many Republicans want to tout their support for a conservative health care solution as well.

Pressed about what a GOP healthcare plan might look like, Boehner pointed reporters to proposals offered by the party during the run-up to the eventual passage of the law.

Then, the GOP’s loose plan was a collection of standard Republican principles: small business tax credits to businesses that offered healthcare, measures to allow young people to stay on their parent’s plan till age 25, medical malpractice reforms and a boost in high risk pools. The Congressional Budget Office at the time said the GOP plan would only reduce the number of uninsured by 3 million while the Democratic proposal would cover 31 million people.

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