IE 11 is not supported. For an optimal experience visit our site on another browser.

Jan. 7 highlights and analysis of unrest in Washington, D.C.

The rioting at the Capitol left four dead and several injured after Trump urged protesters to march on the building.
Image: Scenes from the protests and riots at the Capitol on Jan. 6 with a large Capitol dome on a red background.
Chelsea Stahl / NBC News

Several senior Trump administration officials resigned Thursday after rioting and bloodshed by violent Trump supporters at the Capitol on Wednesday left four people dead and drew calls from members of Congress for an investigation into security measures around the complex.

Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao was the first of Trump's Cabinet secretaries to announce she was resigning, and Education Secretary Betsy DeVos followed hours later.

A police officer died Thursday night from injuries suffered during the pro-Trump mob's breach of the Capitol.

Congress confirmed President-elect Joe Biden's election victory early Thursday morning — more than 14 hours after the tally began — after members were whisked away just after the proceedings had started when a mob of Trump supporters overran the building. Biden is scheduled to be inaugurated as the 46th president on Jan. 20.

This live coverage has ended. Continue reading news from Jan. 8, 2021 about the backlash over the riots.

Read the highlights:

— 'Deeply troubled' by Capitol riot, Transportation Secretary Chao resigns.

What happened after Trump told supporters to swarm the Capitol.

— Law enforcement officials across U.S. shocked by police failure to stop rioters.

— Trump loyalists push evidence-free claims that antifa activists fueled mob.

— How an ordinary Congress vote devolved into disarray.

Nearly 100 lawmakers call for Trump's removal through impeachment or 25th Amendment

Nearly 100 Democratic members of Congress have backed calls for or Trump's removal from office in the next several days either through the impeachment process, the 25th Amendment or another way after the violence that rocked the Capitol on Wednesday. 

The calls come as multiple sources familiar with the matter said there have been informal discussions about invoking the 25th Amendment among staff-level officials within the Trump administration.

Trump spent Wednesday inciting and praising a mob that stormed the Capitol, so much so that he has been locked out of Twitter and Facebook for at least 12 hours.

Liz Cheney says Trump incited the mob that stormed the Capitol

House Republican Conference Chairwoman Liz Cheney of Wyoming emphasized Wednesday how consequential it was for the president to refuse to concede the presidential election. 

"[T]o have for the first time in the history of the nation a president who refuses to leave office and concede after he's left — after he's lost the vote in the Electoral College, you know, is something completely unprecedented and, and very serious and can't be tolerated," she told reporters at the Capitol. 

Reacting to the events at the Capitol, Cheney said, "For the president to incite a violent mob is just something that is, you know, it's beyond sort of the politics of are you moving on or not moving on."