IE 11 is not supported. For an optimal experience visit our site on another browser.

Highlights and analysis: House impeaches Trump for 'incitement of insurrection'

Trump is the first president to be impeached twice.
Image: Red bubbles show the Capitol, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and President Donald Trump with words about \"impeachment,\" \"election\" and \"insurrection.\"
Chelsea Stahl / NBC News

In a historic vote, the House of Representatives on Wednesday impeached President Donald Trump for urging his supporters to march on the U.S. Capitol last week, making him the first president to be impeached twice.

The article of impeachment, for "incitement of insurrection," was adopted by the Democratic-controlled House, 232 to 197, after several hours of debate. A group of 10 Republicans joined Democrats in voting to impeach Trump.

Democrats are prepared to send the resolution to the Senate immediately to allow a trial to determine whether to convict Trump and bar him from holding future office, although it is unclear when that trial will happen.

Trump has defended his speech at a march last week that helped incite a crowd of his supporters to violently storm the U.S. Capitol, calling it "totally appropriate" on Tuesday. That remark came just hours before the House approved a separate resolution calling on Vice President Mike Pence to invoke the 25th Amendment to remove the president from office.

This live coverage has ended. Continue to read about the impeachment process from Monday and Tuesday and about the events leading up to the riot at the Capitol last week and its aftermath.

Read the highlights:

— Pence rejected House Democrats' demand to invoke the 25th Amendment as more Republicans back impeachment.

— "Mind-blowing" number of crimes committed during Capitol riot, 160 case files opened, say officials.

— "Chilling": Security tightens around the Capitol ahead of Biden inauguration amid "increased threat."

Jim Jordan says he wants vote to expel Liz Cheney from GOP House leadership

Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, one of President Trump’s fiercest defenders, suggested Wednesday he was open to trying to expel Rep. Liz Cheney, R-Wyo., from GOP House leadership over her support for impeachment.

"The conference ought to vote on that,” Jordan told reporters Wednesday.

Cheney, who as the House Republican Conference Chair is the No. 3 Republican in the House, said Tuesday that she supported Trump’s impeachment or removal from office, saying that when it came to his incitement of the mob that violently stormed the Capitol, "there has never been a greater betrayal by a President of the United States of his office and his oath to the Constitution."

Airbnb canceling, blocking reservations in Washington around Inauguration Day

Airbnb is canceling all reservations in the Washington metro area during inauguration week in light of potential unrest, the company said Wednesday. It is also blocking all new reservations in the area.

“We are aware of reports emerging yesterday afternoon regarding armed militias and known hate groups that are attempting to travel and disrupt the Inauguration,” the company said in a blog post.

The decision follows comments from local D.C. and Virginia leaders Monday urging people to stay home on Inauguration Day and participate virtually.

Earlier this week, Airbnb banned “numerous individuals” associated with known hate groups or the violent attack on the Capitol. 

Guests with canceled reservations will be refunded in full and hosts will be reimbursed. It is also canceling reservations in the area made through its last-minute lodging agency HotelTonight.

House now conducting procedural rule votes

The House has concluded debate on the procedural rule ahead of impeachment.  

There will now be two procedural votes. These are not votes on the actual article of impeachment. 

The first vote is a procedural vote offered by Republicans that seeks to amend the rule to immediately consider H.R. 275, which establishes a bipartisan commission to examine the circumstances around the attack on the Capitol on Jan. 6.  This vote will take between 40 minutes and 1 hour.

The second vote governs the floor for consideration of the article of impeachment, setting up two hours of debate. This vote is also expected to take between 40 minutes and 1 hour.

National Guard troops pose before Rosa Parks statue in Capitol

A National Guard member poses for a picture with a statue of Rosa Parks as the House convenes ahead of an impeachment vote on Wednesday.Joshua Roberts / Reuters

Putting Trump’s House GOP defectors into historical context

WASHINGTON — In 1998, five House Democrats broke with their party to impeach Bill Clinton over his affair with Monica Lewinsky. 

And in 2019, zero House Republicans defected from Donald Trump when he was impeached over the Ukraine matter. (One GOP senator, Mitt Romney, voted to convict Trump in the Senate trail.) 

That’s the modern-day historical context to evaluate the number of House Republicans who might eventually vote on Wednesday to impeach Trump over his role in last week’s insurrection at the Capitol.  

As of publication time on Wednesday, there are at least five House Republicans who said they will vote for Trump’s impeachment today. 

How high will that number eventually be?

Hoyer says House will send article of impeachment to Senate immediately

House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, D-Md., told NBC News that he would send over the article of impeachment to the Senate immediately once it is passed.

He did not specify if immediately meant later Wednesday or another day. The House is set to vote on the article later Wednesday and it is expected to pass with support from both Democrats and a handful of Republicans.

There had been some debate among Democratic leadership, led by Rep. Jim Clyburn of South Carolina, who suggested that they could wait until after Biden's first 100 days in office. Hoyer said that is no longer being discussed.

Capitol Police official tells Congress he saw no FBI intelligence before Jan. 6 siege

The acting assistant chief of the Capitol Police told Congress Tuesday that he was not aware of any intelligence from the FBI in advance of Jan. 6, raising questions about an assertion by a top FBI official that threat information was shared with local police in advance of the Capitol riot.

Steven D’Antuono, the head of the FBI’s Washington DC field office, said Tuesday that the FBI had shared some information about threats of violence with local police before the Jan. 6 storming of the Capitol, including a report by the FBI’s Norfolk field office that extremists were threatening a “war.”

The report mentioned people sharing a map of tunnels at the Capitol complex and coordinating travel to Washington, according to The Washington Post, which first reported on the F.B.I. document.

But a readout of a closed-door briefing of Republican House members Tuesday, obtained by NBC News, quotes acting U.S. Capitol Police Assistant Chief Sean Gallagher as saying he never saw any such information.

Read the story.