Rally at your own risk: Trump campaign's coronavirus disclaimer to supporters

Attendees for the June 19 Trump rally are being asked to acknowledge "an inherent risk of exposure to COVID-19" and agree not to hold the campaign liable.
Image: President Donald Trump speaks at a rally in North Charleston, S.C., on Feb. 28, 2020.
President Donald Trump speaks at a rally in North Charleston, S.C., on Feb. 28, 2020.Saul Loeb / AFP - Getty Images file

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By Dareh Gregorian

President Donald Trump is set to resume his campaign rallies next week — but attendees have to agree not to hold his campaign liable if they get the coronavirus in the 19,000-seat arena.

An invitation for the June 19 event in Tulsa, Oklahoma asks people to register online for the event —and waive their rights to sue if they get sick.

"By clicking register below, you are acknowledging that an inherent risk of exposure to COVID-19 exists in any public place where people are present. By attending the Rally, you and any guests voluntarily assume all risks related to exposure to COVID-19 and agree not to hold Donald J. Trump for President, Inc.," the rally site or organizers "liable for any illness or injury," the form says.

The rally is being held in the Bank of Oklahoma Center and comes as the city is in phase three of reopening from the coronavirus pandemic.

“Under Phase 3, businesses may resume unrestricted staffing at their worksites by observing proper CDC-recommended social distancing protocols and are recommended to continue increased cleaning and disinfecting practices," Gov. Kevin Stitt's office said in a May 29th statement.

A Trump campaign official said there would be health precautions in place at the event but did not elaborate. White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany told reporters on Wednesday she didn't have specific information but said "we will ensure that everyone who goes is safe."

Stitt, a Republican, has hailed the Trump event. “The President is making Oklahoma his first campaign stop since March 2, and his visit here confirms Oklahoma is the national example in responsibly and safely reopening," he said Wednesday.

The event had already been controversial because of the site and the date. Tulsa is the site of the Greenwood massacre, where a white mob killed an estimated 300 black people and torched the neighborhood's "Black Wall Street" in 1921, and the 19th is also known as Juneteenth, a holiday that marks the end of slavery in the United States.