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The latest political news and analysis from the campaign trail:

Elizabeth Warren unveils anti-corruption reform proposals

NEW YORK — Amid all the dozens of Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s plans, there’s really one common thread between them: they aim to take on corruption. 

And corruption itself is the issue of the day Monday, with the Massachusetts senator releasing a 15-page plan for rooting out government corruption — from the White House, to the halls of Congress; Supreme Court justices and federal agencies; and, of course, the revolving door between government officials and employees and the private sector. The plan, Warren writes, “lays out nearly a hundred ways” to fix the corruption problem. 

Democratic 2020 U.S. presidential candidate and U.S. Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) speaks at a campaign house party in Hampton Falls, N.H. on Sept. 2, 2019.Brian Snyder / Reuters

On the trail, Warren often touts her anti-corruption plan as the most sweeping since Watergate — before lamenting that D.C. needs the most sweeping set of reforms since Watergate. 

This release of this plan comes the same day Warren is set to speak under the arch in New York City’s iconic Washington Square Park, a space — her campaign points out — that’s near where the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire took place in 1911. That killed 145 workers and spurred major change in the way of workers’ rights and protections. 

This isn’t the first time Warren will use a major moment and location from the history of labor movement to make a larger point: she made her announcement earlier this year at the Everett textile Mill in Lawrence, Mass., where in 1912 women workers went on strike to demand fair wages. 

Among the highlights of the plan: 

  • Require IRS release of tax returns for all candidates running or serving in government. For presidential candidates, Warren recommends releasing at least 8 years of returns.
  • A ban on individual stock trading for government officials.
  • Presidents and vice presidents must put businesses into blind trusts and sell them off.
  • Make sure no future candidate can get political assistance from a foreign government or solicit large hush money payments with out legal consequences by clarifying the definition of “in kind contributions.” 
  • Ban corporate bonuses for executives that leave to serve in government.
  • Lobbyists can’t take government jobs for 2 years after lobbying (with limited exceptions) and corporate lobbyists have to wait 6 years.
  • Elected officials and government appointees would be barred from ever becoming lobbyists.
  • Total Ban lobbying on behalf of foreign entities.
  • Ban lobbyists from being able to donate to, or fundraise/bundle/host fundraisers for, political candidates.
  • Impose a tax on entities that spend more than $500,000/year on lobbying.
  • Ban members of Congress and senior staff from serving on corporate boards in both paid and unpaid capacities.
  • More closely regulates judges’ ability to accept all-expense-paid trips to seminars by establishing a new fund that covers “reasonable” expense for such judicial seminars. Also bans judges from owning individual stocks.
  • Allow continued investigation of judges accused of wrong-doing, even after they step down.
  • Establish a new Office of Public Integrity to investigate ethics complaints, impose penalties on violators, and refer “egregious violations” to the DOJ.

Bernie Sanders' campaign shuffles New Hampshire staff

CHARLESTON, S.C. — The Sanders campaign is in the middle of a significant staff shuffle, reassigning the campaign’s New Hampshire state director, and adding teams to build operations in Massachusetts and Maine.

“This campaign is building up and spreading out,” campaign manger Faiz Shakir told NBC News.

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders from Vermont during a rally in Denver on Sept. 9, 2019.David Zalubowski / AP

The previous New Hampshire director Joe Caiazzo will become the Massachusetts state director. Shannon Jackson, who was a senior advisor to the campaign in 2016, will take over as New Hampshire state director. Ben Collings will lead the campaign’s operation in Maine.

“We’re making some moves to play for the long haul here and to put ourselves in a position to not only do well in the early states, but to do well on Super Tuesday and hopefully by that point secure the nomination,” Shakir explained.

The Vermont senator won New Hampshire in 2016 by more than 20 points. 

Public polls show a tight race in the first in the nation primary state this time around, with one from Emerson college showing the Vermont senator in third place, another from RKM Research showing him in first.

An advisor to Sen. Sanders says the campaign has been conducting internal polling, but would not get into the details of the findings. In the past, the campaign has released memos and briefed reporters on the results of favorable internal polling.

Booker on health care: Don't 'sacrifice progress for purity'

WASHINGTON — Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., downplayed the divide within his party on health care while imploring Democrats to aim high but work to make gains where they can. 

Booker has argued he supports the goal of a 'Medicare for All' system, but has also argued for a more pragmatic approach in the short term for trying to cover every American. And he said that the 2018 midterm elections, where Democrats made big gains in the House with a strategy centered on health care, proves that voters are buying what the Democrats are selling. 

Booker was addressing the split that was evident again during last week's Democratic presidential debate. "I feel it when I talk to really good people on that stage that I know, that there is a unifying message here that, look, we are a nation with a savagely broken health care system," he said Sunday on "Meet the Press."

"We're the party that's trying to say, 'everybody should have health insurance.' We're going to fight to get there. We can put the ideal out there but walk and chew gum at the same time. In other words, not sacrifice progress for purity."

Joe Biden to give most his most expansive remarks to date on race Sunday

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. — Former Vice President Joe Biden plans to make his most expansive comments to date on the subject of race Sunday, exploring the nation’s ongoing struggle to live up to its founding ideals of equality as his campaign seeks to deepen connections with minority communities. 

First in Alabama, Biden will deliver the keynote address at services marking the 56th anniversary of the bombing of Birmingham's 16th Street Baptist Church, a searing moment amid the civil rights movement that took the lives of four young black girls.

On Sunday morning, the Biden campaign released excerpts from the speech.

"The domestic terrorism of white supremacy has been the antagonist of our highest ideals from before our founding," Biden is expected to say. “Lynch mobs, arsonists, bomb makers and lone gunmen — and as we all now realize, this violence does not live in the past."

Democratic presidential candidate and former Vice President Joe Biden answers questions during a town hall on July 7, 2019, in Charleston, S.C.Meg Kinnard / AP file

 “The same poisonous ideology that lit the fuse at 16th Street pulled the trigger in Mother Emanuel, unleashed the anti-Semitic massacre in Pittsburgh and Poway and saw a white supremacist gun down innocent Latino immigrants in an El Paso parking lot with military-grade weapons declaring it would stop a quote 'Hispanic invasion of Texas,'" the excerpts continue. “We have not relegated racism and white supremacy to the pages of history.”

Later in Miami, Biden will make his most direct appeal to Latino voters to date with a campaign stop that will emphasize the contributions of immigrants in a direct contrast to actions by the Trump administration.

Together, his remarks are expected to build on another recent major speech, in Burlington, Iowa. There, Biden noted that “American history is not a fairy tale,” but a "battle for the soul of this nation” that "has been a constant push-and-pull” between its noble aspirations and a legacy of hatred and injustice borne of the original sin of slavery. 

On Sunday, Biden will delve more deeply into the roots of America’s racial divisions, aides say, and highlight how he views that “there can be no realization of the American dream without grappling with the centuries that preceded it.”

"We can’t understand this shocking attack without understanding our original sin of slavery and the centuries-long campaign of violence, fear, and trauma wrought upon black people in this country since,” T.J. Ducklo, a Biden campaign spokesperson said previewing his remarks in Birmingham, where he will link that tragic event with recent events.

“The same poisonous ideology that lit the fuse at 16th Street pulled the trigger in Mother Emanuel,” Ducklo said. "The same vitriol and anti-Semitism that launched pogroms in Europe was on full display in Pittsburgh and Poway. The same small-mindedness and xenophobia that targeted Irish and Italian and Chinese immigrants, each in turn, also stalked an El Paso parking lot with military-grade weaponry.

The speech may also highlight a paradox in Biden’s campaign. The former Vice President to the nation’s first black president enjoys some of his strongest support from black voters. But he has also faced intense scrutiny for both his legislative record and past statements on racial issues.

His opponents seized on comments at a June fundraiser about his work with segregationist lawmakers. And Thursday, his response to a question about reparations, including calling for social workers to "help parents deal with how to raise their children” because "they don't know quite what to do” also drew sharp criticism.

Biden appeared to offer a preview of his remarks at a fundraiser in Dallas Saturday  telling donors: "Hate only hides, it doesn't go away. If you give it any oxygen, hate comes out from under the rocks.”

It is not yet clear given the solemn occasion how directly Biden will fault President Trump for stoking racial divisions. In Iowa last month, he condemned the president for “giving license and safe harbor for hate to white supremacists, Neo-Nazis and the KKK,” most notably in his response to Charlottesville. 

Ducklo said Biden intends to call for the nation to again come together "with persistent effort, with fortitude in our actions, and with faith in ourselves and the future to move forward and continue the progress towards living up to our founding values.”

In the afternoon, Biden will continue to stress that message of unity in Miami, where aides say he will tell Latinos at the historic Ball and Chain Cuban nightclub in the heart of Calle Ocho that the “American dream is big enough” to continuing welcoming immigrants into the United States. 

On the campaign trail he has often mentioned how Latinos play a critical role in today’s economy and often thanks immigrants in town halls for choosing America as their new home country. He is expected to “build on a message of values” that run deep in the Latino community and unites Venezuelans, Puerto Ricans, Cubans and more Latinos, which will be represented in the crowd.

The campaign is viewing this speech as a continued effort by the vice president as he continues to speak directly to the Latino community. They expect the president to ramp up travel to reach Latino voters directly from the most populated areas like Miami to lesser known pockets in Des Moines, Iowa throughout the fall.  

Marianna Sotomayor reported from Miami.

ICYMI: Debate rewind

WASHINGTON — Three hours of debate on one night is a lot to ask of an audience, so for those who couldn't commit to it all, here's a quick roundup of some of the best NBC News coverage: 

Democratic presidential candidates Senator Amy Klobuchar, Senator Cory Booker, South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg, Senator Bernie Sanders, former Vice President Joe Biden, Senator Elizabeth Warren, Senator Kamala Harris, entrepreneur Andrew Yang, former Rep. Beto O'Rourke and former Housing Secretary Julian Castro pose before the start at the 2020 Democratic U.S. presidential debate in Houston, Texas on Sept. 12, 2019.Jonathan Bachman / Reuters

The debate topics were nearly identical to the last two debates: health care, immigration, climate change and gun control. And the progressives vs. the pragmatists divide is still intact, despite former Vice President Joe Biden being sandwiched by the two most left-leaning candidates on the stage, Sens. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., and Bernie Sanders, I-Vt. So while expectations were high that this debate would establish just who the leader of the field is, nothing much has changed since that first debate in June. 

Unlike the second Democratic debate when candidates didn't shy away from critiquing the Obama record, last night candidates argued why they were best fit to carry-out President Obama's legacy on health care. The most cutting moment? Former HUD Secretary Julán Castro told Biden that he's "fulfilling the legacy of Barack Obama" and Biden's not. Biden retorted that that comment would come as a surprise to Obama. 

Heading into this debate, former Texas Rep. Beto O'Rourke and South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg were fighting to maintain relevance after high-polling and competitive launches. 

Folks here and NBC News provided real-time analysis as the debate ticked on. Find everything from the Republican response to Beto O'Rourke championing mandatory gun buybacks to fact-checks on statements about child poverty in our debate live blog.

Fourth Democratic debate announced

WASHINGTON – The fourth Democratic debate will be held in Westerville, Ohio on Oct. 15, and potentially Oct. 16 if more than 10 candidates qualify and remain in the race. The DNC announced that CNN and The New York Times will co-host the debate. 

The stage before the first Democratic presidential primary debate hosted by NBC in Miami, Fla., on June 26, 2019.Drew Angerer / Getty Images file

The debate qualifications were previously released after several candidates missed the cut for the third debate. The qualifications for October's debate are the same as the September debate, meaning that any of the 10 candidates on the stage on the third debate will have already qualified for the next one. 

Tom Steyer, who did not participate on Thursday night, has announced that he met the debate qualifications for October. That would make it 11 participants.

The format of the debate has not been announced, but CNN's Anderson Cooper and Erin Burnett, plus The New York Times' Marc Lacey, will moderate the debate. 

Conservative PAC ad using AOC ran in just three markets during Democratic debate

WASHINGTON — During last night's Democratic debate, some television viewers saw the first TV ad from the new conservative PAC, New Faces GOP. The ad featured a burning picture of Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., while the ad's moderator, the PAC's executive director Elizabeth Heng, decried Ocasio-Cortez as "the face of socialism and ignorance". 

The ad is the group's first ad of the 2020 election cycle and it spent $96,000 to run it Thursday night in three media markets: New York City, Washington, D.C. and Fresno-Visalia, Calif. 

Heng, a failed congressional candidate in California, appears in the ad talking about her father's life in Cambodia under the Khmer Rouge regime, saying that "forced obedience," and "starvation" are the costs of socialism. Ocasio-Cortez has identified herself as a Democratic Socialist, like presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt.  

Ocasio-Cortez responded Thursday, tweeting, "Republicans are running TV ads setting pictures of me on fire to convince people they aren't racist." 

NBC News' Elisha Fieldstadt has more on the ad and the reaction to it here.

Several candidates didn’t make tonight’s debate stage. What are they doing instead?

WASHINGTON — Ten Democratic presidential hopefuls will take the debate stage tonight in Houston. A handful of others will not.

Candidates qualified for the party’s third round of 2020 presidential primary debates by having both 130,000 individual donors and reaching at least 2 percent in four qualifying polls.

Democratic presidential candidates take the stage for the first of two Democratic presidential primary debates on July 30, 2019, in Detroit.Carlos Osorio / AP

Here’s what some of the other, non-qualifying Democratic contenders are up to Thursday night.

Tom Steyer: The billionaire activist — who appears to have qualified for the October debate — will host a town hall in Iowa before tonight’s debate begins, according to his campaign. Steyer held similar town halls this week in South Carolina, where on Tuesday he received his first presidential endorsement.

Tim Ryan: Though he won’t be on the debate stage, the Ohio congressman is hoping to reach voters with a self-released album detailing his policy points. Ryan dropped his album, called “A New and Better Agenda,” earlier this week on Spotify. He also campaigns today in New Hampshire.

Steve Bullock: During the day Thursday, the Montana governor will host two events in Iowa with former Iowa First Lady Christie Vilsack, according to his campaign. On Tuesday, Bullock’s campaign sought to reassure donors ahead of the debate with a memo emphasizing that the race is far from over. 

“Let’s start by acknowledging two facts: First, we won’t see Gov. Bullock on the debate stage in Houston this Thursday,” wrote campaign manager Jennifer Ridder. “Second, not a single Democratic primary voter or caucus — goer will cast a vote until February — and we won’t choose our nominee until five months after that.”

John Delaney: The former Maryland congressman will be doing press interviews in New York on Thursday, “making the case to voters,” his campaign tells NBC News.

Michael Bennet: The senator from Colorado will be meeting with workers in Iowa. A campaign spokesperson says Bennet plans to watch the debate, though he “knows most Americans aren’t yet tuned into this election.”

Marianne Williamson: The self-help author will watch the debate from Los Angeles, where she is hosting a watch party and will livestream her post-debate commentary, according to her campaign.

Tulsi Gabbard’s and Bill de Blasio’s campaigns did not respond to requests for comment.

Surrogates for other campaigns preview possible lines of attack against Warren

HOUSTON — It’s been a summer of mostly smooth sailing for Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., as she has climbed in the polls and doled out near-weekly policy plans, all without much negative attention from her 2020 presidential primary opponents.

That could change Thursday night in Houston — and if it does, we may already have a roadmap to possible attack lines. Not from the other 2020 candidates themselves, but from their surrogates in the waning weeks of summer.

Biden surrogates, for instance, have attacked Warren on what they call hypocrisy — both of her no-big-donor fundraising pledge and her economic pitch.

Ed Rendell talked about the issue in comments to the New York Times this week, asking, “can you spell hypocrite?” Rendell noted that he had held a fundraiser for her in 2018 and also donated to her cause. “She didn’t have any trouble taking our money the year before,” Mr. Rendell told the Times. “All of a sudden, we were bad guys and power brokers and influence-peddlers. In 2018, we were wonderful.” 

He followed the comments with a tough op-ed Wednesday, chiding Warren and saying she “didn’t seem to have any trouble taking our money in 2018, but suddenly we were power brokers and influence peddlers in 2019. The year before, we were wonderful.”

And down in South Carolina, Biden-backing Dick Harpootlian recently gave Politico this quote about the cost of her many plans to address the nation's ills: “She’s promised about $50 trillion worth of benefits in the last 30 days. Her economics are fraud and at some point someone is going to point that out. She’s a multimillionaire professor at Harvard. She can’t rail against the 1 percent — she is one of the 1 percent.” 

Supporters of Sen. Kamala Harris, too, have gone at Warren. Bakari Sellers, a former South Carolina lawmaker and now Hardis supporter, told Politico “Warren has gotten a pass in both debates” and said she has an “inability to make her plans actual reality. There are a lot of voters — especially black voters — who will say, ‘A lot of this is pie in the sky and we want pie on the table.’”

And at a late August rally, actress and Sen. Bernie Sanders-backer Susan Sarandon told the crowd: “[Sanders] is not someone who used to be Republican.” She didn’t name names, but the subtle dig could very well apply to Warren, who was previously registered as a Republican until her 40’s. The knock is even more striking, though, because of how Sanders and Warren have avoided going at each other head to head in this race so far.

If she comes under fire from other Democrats on the debate stage Thursday night, those might be some of the lines of attack to expect.

On debate day, Harris nabs endorsement from prominent Latino congressman

HOUSTON — Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., has won the endorsement of Rep. Ruben Gallego, a rising star in the Congressional Hispanic Caucus and a Marine Corps veteran, Gallego said in an exclusive interview with NBC News.

“Kamala, number one, does have the best chance of beating Donald Trump,” Gallego, an Arizona Democrat, said over the telephone Wednesday as he listed his reasons for endorsing Harris. “She’s going to be able to appeal to all angles of our Democratic voting base.”

He will serve as national security chair for the campaign, Harris's team said.

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Kamala Harris speaks at the New Hampshire Democratic Party Convention on Sep. 7, 2019 in Manchester.Scott Eisen / Getty Images

The boost comes at an auspicious moment for Harris: just hours before she and her rivals take the stage in Houston for the third debate of the primary season and at a time when her poll numbers have stagnated in the single digits. Harris currently ranks fourth in the Real Clear Politics average of national polls at 6.9 percent.

While Gallego may not be a household name for most Americans, his endorsement was sought by other contenders for the nomination.

“We did get approached by basically every other campaign,” he said.

"Ruben has been a champion for immigrants, veterans, and Arizonans for his entire career, and I'm honored to earn his endorsement," Harris said in a statement provided to NBC.

"From his service to our nation in Iraq to his work expanding Medicaid in Arizona to his leadership on immigration and veterans affairs in Congress, Ruben embodies the best of who we are as a nation," she said. "I look forward to working with him on the issues that are waking working people up in the middle of the night -- as well as turning Arizona blue in 2020."

Prior to endorsing Harris, Gallego had been chairman of another campaign — that of close personal friend, Rep. Eric Swalwell, D-Calif., who dropped out of the race.

Just 39, a Harvard graduate who left school to serve in the infantry in Iraq, Gallego was viewed as a potential Senate candidate in Arizona this cycle before deferring to astronaut Mark Kelly.

Both Gallego and Harris pointed to her plan to provide access to housing and health care for half a million more veterans as an area of agreement between them. He said in the interview with NBC that Harris's version of a universal health care plan was the best among the candidates and he praised her work on immigration and other issues of importance to the Latino community.

Trump team boasts that the president delivered North Carolina victory

WASHINGTON — President Trump’s re-election team is taking credit for two Republican congressional victories in North Carolina Tuesday, particularly touting a narrow win in a competitive race in a district Trump won by about 12 points in 2016.

In a briefing with reporters Wednesday, Trump campaign manager Brad Parscale argued there’s “no question” Trump’s last-minute rally and “personal efforts” pushed GOP candidate Dan Bishop over the edge in the Ninth District, where he beat Democrat Dan McCready in a special election after last year’s midterm results were tossed out due to allegations of election fraud.

Trump tweeted late Tuesday night that Bishop “asked me for help, we changed his strategy together, and he ran a great race.” Campaign aides declined to offer specifics on what exactly shifted and whether the president himself offered the candidate advice.

Despite lowering expectations earlier this week and pushing back on the notion that the congressional district race wasn’t a “bellwether” for next year, the Trump team is now boasting about what the gains mean heading into a general election.

Though Trump wasn’t on the ballot, Parscale maintained the enthusiasm the president is able to generate when he holds rallies like this week’s in Fayetteville and last months’ in Greenville, N.C., contributed to “driving significant turnout.”

In addition to the traditional campaign rallies, the re-elect effort also held fundraisers, organized a multi-stop tour for Vice President Pence, recorded robocalls and targeted online fundraising.

Bishop echoed that praise for Trump in a Wednesday morning appearance on Fox News where he said that “a lot of credit goes to the president” for his victory.

Aides dismissed criticism, however, that the narrow victory spelled trouble for the Republicans heading into 2020.  “These are isolated moments in time so congratulations to the Democrats for taking moral victory laps last night. We Republicans and President Trump will take the actual victory,” senior political adviser Bill Stepien said.

Asked whether there is concern about maintaining suburban voters versus rural voters, the campaign said it is not focused on “geographic targets” and is instead targeting all kinds of communities, regardless of district or state.

On Wednesday, while expressing displeasure with recent polling that shows his approval rating slipping,  the president argued he “hasn’t even started campaigning yet.”

Notably, Trump is the only modern president to ever file re-election paperwork on the day of his inauguration and his campaign has held dozens of rallies since then. The president officially announced his run for a second term in June, and has held five 2020 events since then.

President Donald Trump, from left, gives his support to Dan Bishop, a Republican running for the special North Carolina 9th District U.S. Congressional race as he speaks at a rally in Fayetteville, N.C., on Monday, Sept. 9, 2019.Chris Seward / AP

The House Republican campaign arm, the National Republican Congressional Committee, acknowledged Trump’s impact on the race in a memo released Wednesday, where they called him “the most effective surrogate for Republicans.” The group added it believes Trump will be a helpful boost as they try to win back the seats Democrats flipped during the midterms.

Democrats don’t share that perspective, however. They’re confident that the narrow margin of victory in the conservative district is a harbinger of more bad news to come for Republicans in 2020.

The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee said in a memo released Wednesday that the result shows “Democrats are pushing further into Republican strongholds and Republicans are on their heels heading into 2020.” They went on to point to McCready’s focus on health care as one reason why the race was so close.