Subscribe to Breaking News emails

You have successfully subscribed to the Breaking News email.

Subscribe today to be the first to to know about breaking news and special reports.

New Yorker Magazine: Law Didn't Require Consent to Record Scaramucci Call

/ Source: Associated Press
Image: White House Communications Director Anthony Scaramucci Interviewed By Television Reporter At The White House
White House Communications Director Anthony Scaramucci speaks on a morning television show, from the north lawn of the White House on July 26.Mark Wilson / Getty Images

Breaking News Emails

Get breaking news alerts and special reports. The news and stories that matter, delivered weekday mornings.

NEW YORK — Anthony Scaramucci says his profanity-laced phone call that preceded his ouster as White House communications director was recorded without his permission.

But a representative for The New Yorker on Thursday notes that reporter Ryan Lizza wasn't required by law to get Scaramucci's consent to record the conversation.

Federal law permits taping telephone conversations if one party consents to the taping — in this case, Lizza. Some places require consent of both parties, but not Washington, D.C., where Lizza took the call.

Related: What Really Happened to Anthony Scaramucci

Scaramucci called Lizza last month and insulted White House aides using vulgar language during the phone interview. The former Wall Street financier was fired July 31 after only 11 days on the job.

Scaramucci used #lowlife to describe Lizza on Twitter on Wednesday.

Scaramucci begins a media tour Sunday with an interview with George Stephanopoulos on ABC's "This Week." He'll follow that up with an appearance Monday on Stephen Colbert's "The Late Show."

Breaking News Emails

Get breaking news alerts and special reports. The news and stories that matter, delivered weekday mornings.
MORE FROM news