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Analysis after a contentious second day of Judiciary Committee testimony

Presenting the evidence: The House Judiciary Committee is hearing from lawyers for Democrats and Republicans about the Intelligence Committee's investigation into Trump.

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The House Judiciary Committee on Monday heard from lawyers for both Democrats and Republicans on findings from the Intelligence Committee's impeachment inquiry over allegations that President Donald Trump withheld aid to Ukraine in order to pressure its government to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden.

Witnesses for the Intelligence Committee included majority counsel Daniel Goldman and the Republicans' lawyer, Steve Castor. Also on the witness list was Barry Berke, majority counsel for the Judiciary Committee. The hearing began at 9 a.m.

Follow us here for all of the latest breaking news and analysis from NBC News' political reporters, as well as our teams on Capitol Hill and at the White House.

TRUMP IMPEACHMENT HIGHLIGHTS

  • The House will announce articles of impeachment against President Trump on Tuesday, multiple sources told NBC News. They are expected to be abuse of power and obstruction of Congress.
  • The Monday hearing, which included roughly nine hours of testimony, was marked by interruptions and fiery exchanges.
  • Rudy Giuliani's role in the push by Trump to investigate a political rival once again became the focus during an intense round of questioning by the Democrats' lawyer.
  • As the Republicans' lawyer was being questioned, the Justice Department inspector general released its long-awaited report examining the origins of the probe into Trump's 2016 presidential campaign.

Download the NBC News mobile app for the latest news on the impeachment inquiry

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Meet the lawyers who will be heard from in second hearing

Testimony will be heard from the attorneys for the Democrats, Daniel Goldman, and the Republicans' lawyer, Steve Castor. Barry Berke and Castor will provide opening statements for the majority and minority, respectively, according to a statement from the Judiciary Committee on Friday.

Daniel Goldman

Goldman is a former prosecutor for the U.S. attorney’s office for the Southern District of New York from 2007 to 2017, where he served as the deputy chief of the organized crime unit. This past March, Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., who is the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, tapped him to be the committee's senior adviser and director of investigations.

He received his undergraduate degree from Yale University and his law degree from Stanford University. He is a former legal analyst for MSNBC.

Steve Castor

He was brought over to the Intelligence Committee from the Oversight Committee by Rep. Jim Jordan of Ohio.

Castor has served as counsel for Oversight for 14 years and helped question witnesses during its probes of the attack on the U.S. embassy in Benghazi and into allegations the IRS was focusing on political targets during the Obama administration.

He earned his law degree from George Washington University and previously worked in commercial litigation in Philadelphia and Washington, according to a biography on the Federalist Society website

Barry Berke

A New York-based defense attorney, Berke is described by the committee as a leading trial lawyer and an expert on federal criminal law, including public corruption. 

Impeachment rewind: Highlights from Fiona Hill and David Holmes' testimony

 

How the second day of testimony will go

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., on Friday released the procedure for their second hearing:

"Monday’s hearing will proceed in two phases. First, Majority and Minority counsel for the Judiciary Committee will present opening statements for up to one hour, equally divided. Second, Majority and Minority counsel for the Intelligence Committee will present for up to 90 minutes, equally divided. Majority and Minority counsel for the Intelligence Committee will then take questions from the Committee."

The hearing begins at 9 a.m.

'Weird': Congress reacts to Giuliani's latest Ukrainian venture

One of President Donald Trump's staunchest allies said it was "weird" and "odd" that the president's personal attorney, Rudy Giuliani, was back digging for dirt on former Vice President Joe Biden in Ukraine.

However, Rep. Matt Gaetz, R-Fla., told ABC's "This Week" it was promising to hear that Trump said Giuliani wants to speak to Congress about his latest trip to Ukraine.

Echoing earlier remarks he made about it being "weird" that Giuliani was back in Ukraine, Gaetz said he believes Trump "urging Mayor Giuliani to provide that clarity to the Congress will be helpful in resolving what seems to be odd having him over there at this time."

The Florida Republican's comments came after Trump told reporters Saturday that he believed Giuliani would deliver findings from his recent trip to Ukraine to Congress and Attorney General William Barr.

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Esper declines to say if he knew of political considerations involved with Ukraine aid

Defense Secretary Mark Esper declined to say Sunday whether he was aware of any political considerations regarding the months-long hold on nearly $400 million in U.S. security aid to Ukraine.

"I'm not going to get into any of that," Esper told "Fox News Sunday." "Again, there is a congressional inquiry underway and I'll leave that process unto itself."

Esper said there were "technical and legal issues" preventing the Pentagon from providing Congress with requested documents pertaining to the hold on military aid.

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Swalwell: Mueller Report will be included in articles of impeachment as pattern of behavior

Rep. Eric Swalwell, D-Calif., gave brief remarks after exiting a Judiciary Committee meeting in Longworth Office Building.

He discussed forthcoming potential articles of impeachment, indicated that the Mueller Report would at least be included in articles as far as establishing the president's pattern of behavior. 

"I can promise you that the pattern of inviting foreign governments to help him cheat an election, and covering up investigations, that will be included," Swalwell said. 

He noted that Monday's hearing will present to the American people evidence not previously revealed in live hearings, including phone calls involving the House Intelligence Committee's ranking member, Rep. Devin Nunes. 

Nadler: Impeachment articles will go before Judiciary this week