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Trump impeachment inquiry: Live updates and the latest news

Stay informed about Democrats' impeachment efforts and the Trump administration's responses.
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The fast-moving impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump, stemming from the president's dealings with Ukraine, involves numerous hearings, depositions and subpoenas of present and former top administration officials and other figures — and more than a few presidential tweets.

Follow us here for all of the latest breaking news and analysis from NBC News' political reporters as well as our teams on Capitol Hill and at the White House.

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Latest highlights:

Public hearings to begin this week

  • Congress will hear testimony Wednesday from the career diplomat who called the idea of withholding aid money to Ukraine in exchange for investigations "crazy" — as well as a State Department official.

Investigators release another transcript

  • Laura Cooper, the top Pentagon official overseeing U.S. policy regarding Ukraine, testified that Trump directed aid freeze.

Trump gets a less-than-warm welcome in New York City

Download the NBC News mobile app for the latest news on the impeachment inquiry

Live Blog

Pelosi speaks during impeachment resolution debate

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi speaks during a House resolution vote on Oct. 31, 2019.

Standing next to an image of the American flag, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said the impeachment inquiry was "no cause for glee or comfort" and was instead occasion to be "solemn and prayerful."

She said the House had to "gather so much information to take us to this next step," a vote on a resolution setting rules for the impeachment inquiry. She then quoted Benjamin Franklin in saying it is Congress' responsibility to uphold the Constitution.

The U.S. is "a Republic, if we can keep it," Pelosi quoted Franklin as having said.

Rep. Adam Schiff: 'I did not take any pleasure' in leading impeachment inquiry

Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee who has been leading the investigation of the impeachment inquiry into Trump, said somberly that he “did not take any pleasure” in leading the process.

He defended his decisions to hold interviews in a private setting, saying that the “work has necessarily occurred behind closed doors because we have the task of finding the facts” despite efforts by several lawmakers and agencies, including the Justice Department “to obstruct.” He added that the resolution will lead the process into a more open chapter.

“This resolution sets the stage for the next phase of our investigation. One in which the American people will have the opportunity to hear from the witnesses first hand,” he said. 

Republicans pivot to national security argument

Two top Republicans pivoted to a national security argument — that Democrats are leaving the nation vulnerable to attack — by allowing the Intelligence Committee to investigate the president.

“[T]hey will be held accountable by history for what they are doing,” House Republican Conference Chair Liz Cheney, R-Wyo., said. “They have absolutely no right to talk about threats to this nation if they are diverting the full attention, resources and focus of the House Intelligence Committee onto a sham political process.”

Rep. Devin Nunes, the top Republican on that panel, made a similar case. So, as Democrats argue that Trump is threatening the Constitution, expect to hear more about how Republicans believe investigating him imperils national security.

Rep. Hakeem Jeffries, speaking with flag behind him, prompts loud applause

Rep. Hakeem Jeffries, D-N.Y., with an imprint of the American flag sitting on an easel behind him, delivered an impassioned speech about the intent of the Founding Fathers and how the Constitution was designed to empower Congress in a situation like this one.

"They didn’t want a dictator, they didn’t want a monarch," he said.

Jeffries, the chair of the House Democratic Caucus, ended his remarks by bellowing, "No one is above the law," prompting a round of applause from his colleagues in the chamber.

Rep. Hakeem Jeffries, D-NY, speaks during a House resolution vote on Oct. 31, 2019.

One Democratic congressman has personal experience with impeachment

Rep. Alcee Hastings, D-Fla., who spoke as fellow members of the House Rules Committee discussed Thursday's resolution, has personal experience with impeachment.

Hastings, who served as a federal judge decades ago, was actually impeached himself over a bribery and perjury scandal. In 1988, a Democratic-controlled House voted overwhelmingly to impeach Hastings, and the Senate moved to remove him the following year. Hastings became the sixth judge in U.S. history to be impeached and removed. He was then elected to Congress in 1992 and, six years later voted on President Bill Clinton's impeachment.

Hastings said Thursday that he was supporting the resolution because he "took an oath to defend the Constitution."

Angry Rep. Doug Collins: Judiciary Committee 'has been neutered'

In a fiery speech, Rep. Doug Collins, R-Ga., a member of the House Rules, Judiciary and Oversight committees, yelling from his seat, said “the curtain is coming down on this House” and lamented today as a “dark day.”

He said the House Judiciary Committee, on which he is the ranking Republican, “has been neutered” and accused Democrats of “shredding procedures every day.”

“The resolution before us today is not about fairness, it’s about control,” he said. 

Raskin, Jordan offer opposite views on how Democrats have conducted hearings

Rep. Jamie Raskin, D-Md., a member of the Judiciary and Oversight committees, says during his remarks that Democrats have conducted their hearings in a "scrupulously bipartisan way" and says Trump will be afforded "all the due process" that his predecessors received.

Rep. Jim Jordan of Ohio, the ranking Republican on the House Oversight Committee and a fierce Trump ally, was up next, excoriating his Democratic colleagues for the way in which they have held hearings.

"Trying to put a ribbon on a sham process doesn’t make it any less of a sham," he said.

Three more Democratic holdouts say they'll support rules resolution

Three more Democrats who have not backed the impeachment inquiry have said they will support Thursday's procedural resolution: Reps. Jared Golden, Kendra Horn and Anthony Brindisi.

That means there are only three Democrats who are not expected to vote in support of the resolution: Reps. Jeff Van Drew, Ron Kind and Collin Peterson.

Nunes calls Democrats a 'cult' that is following Schiff 'from one outlandish conspiracy theory to another'

Rep. Devin Nunes, R-Calif., said Thursday that impeaching Trump was the Democrats' plan "from day one" and that adoption of the rules resolution governing the impeachment inquiry simply "gives House approval" to Democrats' "bizarre obsession with overturning the results of the last presidential election."

On Trump's conduct toward Ukraine, Nunes, the ranking member of the House Intelligence Committee, said Democrats simply "don't like the way" Trump "talks to foreign leaders," adding there was "no evidence to support impeachment."

Nunes then called House Democrats a "cult" that was "loyally following" House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., "as he bounces from one outlandish conspiracy theory to another."

Top Republican on Rules Committee wants resolution withdrawn

Rep. Tom Cole, R-Okla., the ranking Republican on the House Rules Committee, has asked for the resolution to be withdrawn.

The request was denied, prompting Cole to then request that the House debate the resolution for four hours — not the one hour that has been scheduled.

Doing so, Cole said, “would provide us an opportunity for all members to participate in the process.”

He then criticized the process by House Democrats that has led to today’s vote.

“It's not a fair process, not a transparent process,” he said.

McGovern speaks after introducing resolution

Rep. Jim McGovern, D-Mass., opened up floor debate on the resolution to solidify the procedures for the impeachment inquiry.

McGovern, the House Rules Committee chairman, introduced the resolution Thursday morning. Stressing "no one is above the law," McGovern said there is "serious evidence Trump might have violated the Constitution" with regard to his conduct toward Ukraine.

The resolution, he said, was about "transparency" and outlining "due process for the president."

He added that "some on the other side" would never be satisfied with the process, no matter what evidence was outlined.