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Trump impeachment inquiry: Live updates and the latest news

Stay informed about Democrats' impeachment efforts and the Trump administration's responses.
Image: President Donald Trump is facing allegations that he tried to strong-arm a foreign leader into launching an investigation that might hurt Democratic contender Joe Biden. In response, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi endorsed impeachment proceedings.
Chelsea Stahl / NBC News

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The fast-moving impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump, stemming from the president's dealings with Ukraine, involves numerous hearings, depositions and subpoenas of present and former top administration officials and other figures — and more than a few presidential tweets.

Follow us here for all of the latest breaking news and analysis from NBC News' political reporters as well as our teams on Capitol Hill and at the White House.

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Pelosi comments on the impeachment hearing

  • The House speaker called the testimony of two career U.S. diplomats at the first impeachment hearing "evidence of bribery."

The White House looks to be in the impeachment fray, and appear above it

  • White House aides say they think Wednesday's testimony wasn't enough to change the minds of the public — or Republican senators.

How presidential candidates spent the impeachment hearing

  • In the split-screen day, Warren was campaigning in New Hampshire, Joe Biden was meeting with union members in Washington and Andrew Yang appeared on a popular radio show in New York.

Download the NBC News mobile app for the latest news on the impeachment inquiry

Live Blog

White House working 'nonstop' to shore up GOP support in face of vote

The White House this morning is keyed in on the significant vote happening on the House floor — and aides believe four or five Democrats could cross party lines to vote with Republicans, according to an administration source.

Another White House aide says the administration has been working “nonstop” to shore up Republican support since House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced the vote: President Trump has met with more than 60 House Republicans face to face over the last two weeks and made numerous phone calls to Republicans, we’re told.

It was also the president who directed acting chief of staff Mick Mulvaney to meet with 30 Republican members at Camp David almost two weeks ago.

Read the full story here.

Pelosi defends resolution's rules, responding to GOP complaints they're not fair to Trump

Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., defended the rules in the impeachment resolution Thursday ahead of the floor vote on the measure, responding to GOP complaints that they're not fair to President Donald Trump and Republicans. 

“These rules are fairer than anything that has gone before in terms of an impeachment proceeding,” Pelosi told reporters at her weekly press conference. 

Pelosi spoke to reporters before the floor vote, which she is expected to preside over — a rare move for the House speaker.

Pelosi declined to answer any additional questions “about what the Republicans say” regarding the resolution. She began her comments by stating that "no one" comes to Congress planning to impeach a president. 

But she blasted Trump for acting as if he can do whatever he wants, ignoring the Constitution. 

“We will proceed with the facts, the truth,” she said about the impeachment inquiry. “This is a sad day.”

Rep. Norma Torres brings her own graphic

Rep. Norma Torres, D-Calif., appeared next to a graphic of Trump that refers to his July call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy in which he asked Volodymyr for a "favor." That call is at the center of Democrats' impeachment efforts.

Rep. Norma Torres, D-CA, speaks during a House resolution vote on Oct. 31, 2019.

Nadler slams Trump, saying his actions 'represent a profound offense against the Constitution'

House Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., whose committee would oversee the creation of articles of impeachment, used his time to condemn the president and lay out the allegations being made against him.

It is “indefensible for any official to demand that an ally investigate his or her political adversaries,” Nadler said — a reference to the July 25 phone call between Trump and Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy.

If the allegations against Trump are found to be true, he said, it “would represent a profound offense against the Constitution and the people of this country.”

Steve Scalise criticizes inquiry as 'Soviet-Style impeachment'

Rep. Steve Scalise, R-La., delivered a fierce criticism of the impeachment proceeding as he stood next to a  graphic featuring an image of Moscow's Red Square and a hammer and sickle in an attempt to demonize Democrats' efforts as "Soviet-style."

The Squad claps back at Trump tweet

Pelosi to preside over vote

Speaker Pelosi is planning to preside over the House during the vote on the impeachment resolution, a senior Democratic leadership source tells NBC News. This is unusual for the speaker and shows the gravity of today’s vote. It will be worth watching if Pelosi votes today; typically, the speaker does not.

New York Rep. Joseph Morelle: 'Our only goal is uncovering the truth'

Rep. Joseph Morelle, D-N.Y., a member of the House Rules Committee, defended the inquiry in plain language.

"Our only goal is uncovering the truth," he said. 

Rebutting Pelosi, McCaul says Constitution doesn't say 'you can do whatever you want to do'

Rep. Michael McCaul, R-Texas, a member of the House Foreign Affairs Committee, offered the first Republican rebuttal to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., arguing that “Article One” of the Constitution does not say “you can do whatever you want to do.”

He said that the process of the impeachment inquiry “denies basic fairness” to Republicans and to the American people and slammed House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., for having conducted a “secret probe outside his committee’s jurisdiction.”

Pelosi holds press conference before impeachment resolution vote

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi talks to reporters just before the House vote on a resolution to formalize the impeachment investigation of President Donald Trump, in Washington, on Oct. 31, 2019.J. Scott Applewhite / AP