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Trump impeachment inquiry: Live updates and the latest news

Stay informed about Democrats' impeachment efforts and the Trump administration's responses.
Image: President Donald Trump is facing allegations that he tried to strong-arm a foreign leader into launching an investigation that might hurt Democratic contender Joe Biden. In response, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi endorsed impeachment proceedings.
Chelsea Stahl / NBC News

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The fast-moving impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump, stemming from the president's dealings with Ukraine, involves numerous hearings, depositions and subpoenas of present and former top administration officials and other figures — and more than a few presidential tweets.

Follow us here for all of the latest breaking news and analysis from NBC News' political reporters as well as our teams on Capitol Hill and at the White House.

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Pelosi comments on the impeachment hearing

  • The House speaker called the testimony of two career U.S. diplomats at the first impeachment hearing "evidence of bribery."

The White House looks to be in the impeachment fray, and appear above it

  • White House aides say they think Wednesday's testimony wasn't enough to change the minds of the public — or Republican senators.

How presidential candidates spent the impeachment hearing

  • In the split-screen day, Warren was campaigning in New Hampshire, Joe Biden was meeting with union members in Washington and Andrew Yang appeared on a popular radio show in New York.

Download the NBC News mobile app for the latest news on the impeachment inquiry

Live Blog

Republicans might say she opted for 'trick'

Grassley says House resolution is 'a day late and a dollar short'

Iowa GOP Sen. Chuck Grassley said the House's impeachment resolution is "a day late and a dollar short."

"This entire process has been contaminated from the beginning and the Senate may have a difficult time taking seriously an impeachment founded on these bases," he said in a statement.

Here's his full statement:

"House Democrats announced the opening of impeachment proceedings more than a month ago. So far, this process has been defined by its secrecy, lack of due process and fundamental unfairness. This vote is an implicit admission by House Democrats of exactly that. It’s a day late and a dollar short.

"Democrats’ impeachment proceedings are rooted in animus, a lack of rights for the accused, no transparency and anger at the 2016 election results. Even with this long-overdue resolution, House Democrats are still denying House Republicans the unrestricted right to call their own witnesses, to rebut Democratic witnesses and to have the same right to subpoena witnesses that the Democrats have granted themselves. And the president’s counsel still doesn’t have the right to be present and ask questions of witnesses before the Intelligence Committee, which has been given the role the Judiciary Committee has played in the past. This all stands in stark contrast to previous impeachment proceedings.

"As a result, this will continue to be a purely partisan and political process – a continuation of Democrats’ impeachment obsession that began before President Trump was even inaugurated. This entire process has been contaminated from the beginning and the Senate may have a difficult time taking seriously an impeachment founded on these bases."

Chaos erupts after vote

Appearing to object to the vote on the resolution that had just concluded, Republicans began yelling “point of order," shouting over the Democrat who was presiding in protest of the resolution, whose rules they have strongly rejected. It was a brief chaotic scene on the House floor following a historic vote.

'Unfair, unconstitutional, and fundamentally un-American': White House blasts House resolution

The White House, in a scathing statement, called the House vote Thursday "unfair, unconstitutional and fundamentally un-American."

"The President has done nothing wrong, and the Democrats know it," White House press secretary Stephanie Grisham said. "Nancy Pelosi and the Democrats’ unhinged obsession with this illegitimate impeachment proceeding does not hurt President Trump; it hurts the American people. The Democrats are choosing every day to waste time on a sham impeachment — a blatantly partisan attempt to destroy the President."

The statement added that Democrats have "done nothing more than enshrine unacceptable violations of due process into House rules" and accused them of wanting "to render a verdict without giving the Administration a chance to mount a defense."

Trump put it more succinctly: "The Greatest Witch Hunt in American history!" he tweeted moments after the vote concluded.

House approves Trump impeachment procedures over GOP objections

The House passed a resolution on Thursday approving procedures for its impeachment inquiry of President Donald Trump, opening a new and public phase of the investigation.

The vote, 232 to 196, was largely along party lines and Republicans objected, alleging that the Democratic inquiry is a farce that has been improperly conducted behind closed doors. House Democrats are now expected to begin holding public hearings in the next few weeks to present testimony against Trump.

The U.S. House of Representatives cast their votes on a resolution that sets up the next steps in the impeachment inquiry of U.S. President Donald Trump on Capitol Hill on Oct. 31, 2019.Tom Brenner / Reuters

Nancy Pelosi presided over the vote — a rare move for a speaker of the House.

Nancy Pelosi wields the gavel as she presides over the U.S. House of Representatives vote on a resolution that sets up the next steps in the impeachment inquiry of U.S. President Donald Trump on Capitol Hill on Oct. 31, 2019.Tom Brenner / Reuters

Amash calls on GOP not to excuse Trump's 'misbehavior'

Details from the floor

Michigan Rep. Rashida Tlaib, an early supporter of impeachment, gave a side-hug to Pelosi as the House prepared to vote on the impeachment resolution. Pelosi had been mingling with other Democrats on the floor, including House Judiciary Chairman Jerry Nadler.

Also present in the gallery was a crowd of tourists watching the vote.

House conducting procedural vote. The vote on the resolution is next.

The House is currently conducting a procedural vote. It will last about 20 minutes and is not the vote on whether to adopt the impeachment resolution that sets up the public phase of the inquiry.

That vote will occur after this vote has concluded and will last about five minutes.

Trump lashes out as House inches toward impeachment resolution vote

McCarthy: Democrats using impeachment to 'undo last election' and 'influence the next one'

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., in fiery remarks slammed his Democratic colleagues for using the impeachment inquiry to "attempt to undo the last election" and “influence the next one."

He said Congress was "abusing its power to discredit democracy" and was portraying "the president’s legitimate actions as an impeachable offense."

"Elections have consequences," McCarthy said. "Our fellow Americans used their vote to choose who will work for them."

"We’re one year away from an election," he said moments later. "Why do you not trust the people? Why do you not allow the people to have a voice?"

He ended by saying, "I guess it’s only fitting you take this vote on Halloween" — a line that prompted resounding applause from his Republican colleagues.

More Democrats than Republicans in the chamber

There are way more Democrats than Republicans in the chamber watching the debate ahead of the vote. Several Republicans are laughing, some in a mocking way.