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Trump impeachment: Analysis and news on the House charges and Senate acquittal of the president

The Senate trial on the two articles of impeachment against Trump, abuse of power and obstruction of Congress, ended with acquittal on both charges.
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Chelsea Stahl / NBC News

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The fast-moving impeachment of President Donald Trump, stemming from his dealings with Ukraine, moved to the Senate for trial in January after the House voted a month earlier to adopt two articles of impeachment: abuse of power and obstruction of Congress.

The Senate voted in early February to acquit the president on both charges.

Trump's impeachment followed weeks of testimony related to his efforts to press Ukraine for investigations into Democratic rivals and hours of fiery debate over the process.

Trump is only the third president in U.S. history to be impeached. Read all of the breaking news and analysis on impeachment from NBC News' political reporters, as well as our teams on Capitol Hill and at the White House.

Trump impeachment highlights

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Live Blog

Democrats zero in on three witnesses for public hearings

In preparing the next phase in their impeachment inquiry of President Donald Trump, Democrats have identified three witnesses as the strongest candidates for public hearings, NBC News has learned.

In the next few weeks, Democrats hope to feature the testimonies of former Ukraine Ambassador Marie Yovanovitch, the nation's current senior diplomat in Ukraine Bill Taylor and Army Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman, according to three sources with knowledge of the deliberations.

The sources stressed the ability of Taylor and Vindman give a firsthand accounts of their understanding that aid to Ukraine was tied to the country's revival of investigations that would serve the president's personal political interests. 

Trump official set for questions on Ukraine ambassador removal

David Hale, under secretary of state for political affairs, is due to appear at a closed door hearing Wednesday and is likely to face questions on the removal of Amb. Marie “Masha” Yovanovich, who has said she was fired by the direction of President Donald Trump

Career diplomat Phillip Reeker told investigators at a previous hearing that Hale had stopped the publication of a statement in support of Yovanovich.

Vindman will testify, if asked

A source familiar with the matter tells NBC News that Vindman will testify publicly in the impeachment inquiry, if asked. This source says he has not yet been asked.

Vindman will return to Capitol Hill on Thursday to review the transcript of his testimony, according to the source familiar.

Updated Friday impeachment inquiry deposition schedule

From an official working on the impeachment inquiry:

The following witnesses are expected to testify in closed session on Friday, Nov. 8:

— Acting White House Chief of Staff John Michael “Mick” Mulvaney

— OMB Associate Director for National Security Programs Mark Sandy

The Committees are in ongoing discussions with other witnesses and we look forward to their testimony.

Two Trump officials expected to show up for impeachment interviews

There is a good chance that David Hale, Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs, shows up tomorrow for his closed-door deposition with House impeachment investigators, according to two sources familiar.

Jennifer Williams, a foreign policy aide to Mike Pence, is also expected to show up for her scheduled deposition on Thursday, according to two sources familiar. 

'Talk to Rudy': Impeachment transcripts detail Giuliani's outsized influence in Ukraine policy

Rudy Giuliani was mentioned more than 430 times during House impeachment investigators' interviews with two key U.S. diplomats, transcripts released on Tuesday show, underscoring the former New York mayor's outsized role in U.S.-Ukraine policy.

More than anyone else, Giuliani shaped Trump's view of Ukraine and caused headaches for top State Department officials, as Gordon Sondland, the U.S. ambassador to the European Union and Kurt Volker, then the U.S. special representative for Ukraine, detailed in their testimonies last month.

Here are some of the most noteworthy references to Giuliani in those documents.

Impeachment faces first big test in Kentucky governor's election

Graham unconcerned about new transcripts: 'We got some guy presuming something'

Judiciary Chairman Senator Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) spoke to NBC and CNN following the Sondland and Volker transcripts being released. On the transcripts, Graham said he hasn’t read the deposition but “bottom line, Mueller meant something to me, I'm not impressed with this whole line of impeachment,” adding “I'm not going to entertain impeaching the President over this matter, period. Done.” Graham also referred to Sondland as “some guy presuming something.” When asked if he will call Hunter Biden to testify, Graham says it doesn’t fall under his jurisdiction but he hopes Senator Risch (R-ID), Chairman of the Foreign Relations Committee, will look at it.

Separately, NBC asked Graham if Giuliani will come in and testify before his committee, to which Graham said “I don’t think he’s coming,” adding that he spoke to him again and Giuliani “never got back” to him on that.

White House signals it won't comply with House request for Mulvaney deposition

When asked if Mulvaney would comply with the request by House Democrats to testify, Hogan Gidley released the following statement to NBC News:

"Past Democrat and Republican Administrations would not be inclined to permit Senior Advisers to the President to participate in such a ridiculous, partisan, illegitimate proceeding – and  neither is this one."