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Trump impeachment inquiry: Live updates and the latest news

Stay informed about Democrats' impeachment efforts and the Trump administration's responses.
Image: President Donald Trump is facing allegations that he tried to strong-arm a foreign leader into launching an investigation that might hurt Democratic contender Joe Biden. In response, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi endorsed impeachment proceedings.
Chelsea Stahl / NBC News

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The fast-moving impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump, stemming from the president's dealings with Ukraine, involves numerous hearings, depositions and subpoenas of present and former top administration officials and other figures — and more than a few presidential tweets.

Follow us here for all of the latest breaking news and analysis from NBC News' political reporters as well as our teams on Capitol Hill and at the White House.

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Trump says he 'will strongly consider' testifying

  • The tweet came in response to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's remarks that he can "come right before the committee and talk, speak all the truth that he wants."

Trump's ire turns on Pompeo amid diplomats' starring roles

  • The president has fumed that his secretary of state is responsible for hiring officials whose testimony threatens to bring down his presidency.

5 things we learned from Yovanovitch's public testimony

Download the NBC News mobile app for the latest news on the impeachment inquiry

Live Blog

Donald Trump Jr. tweets name of person he says is the whistleblower

Donald Trump Jr., the president's eldest son, tweeted on Wednesday the name of a person who some conservative media outlets have alleged is the intelligence community whistleblower whose complaint triggered the House impeachment inquiry.

President Donald Trump has repeatedly attacked the unnamed whistleblower, whose right to anonymity is protected by federal law. On Oct. 14, he tweeted that the whistleblower "must testify" before Congress and that "we must determine the Whistleblower's identity to determine WHY this was done to the USA." 

In recent days, some of Trump's staunchest Republican allies have called on the media to reveal a name, and on Sunday, Trump intensified his own calls for the person to be exposed. "The whistleblower should be revealed," Trump told reporters outside the White House.  

Trump Jr. said in follow up tweets that he did not coordinate with the White House. 

NBC News is not reporting the name of the whistleblower as long as that person wishes to remain anonymous, due to security and safety concerns, and will not publish the names of anyone purportedly identified by outside parties as the whistleblower. NBC News has confirmed, however, that the person is a CIA employee who was detailed to the White House.

Mark Zaid and Andrew Bakaj, lawyers for the whistleblower, have been publicly opposing GOP pressure to reveal the identity of the whistleblower, not only because of his or her personal safety but because they insist that the person's identity is now irrelevant since the claims contained in the complaint have been corroborated by the testimony of other named witnesses in the impeachment probe. 

"Identifying any suspected name for the whistleblower will place that individual and their family at risk of serious harm. We will not confirm or deny any name that is published or promoted by supporters of the president," the attorneys said in a statement Wednesday

"We will note, however, that the publication of a name shows the desperation to deflect from the substance of the whistleblower complaint. It will not relieve the president of the need to address the substantive allegations, all of which have been substantially proven to be true," Zaid and Bakaj added.  

First public hearings in Trump impeachment inquiry to begin next week, Schiff says

Public hearings in Congress will begin next week in the impeachment inquiry of President Donald Trump, House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., said Wednesday.

"Next week, the House Intelligence Committee will hold its first open hearings as part of the impeachment inquiry," said Schiff, the committee's chairman. "On Wednesday, November 13, 2019, we will hear from William Taylor and George Kent. On Friday, November 15, 2019, we will hear from Marie Yovanovitch. More to come."

Read more on the open hearings here.

Mulvaney won't testify, Conway says

Acting White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney will not give closed-door testimony Friday to House investigators, senior White House aide Kellyanne Conway told reporters Wednesday.

"I’m told no," Conway said when asked whether Mulvaney would appear. 

When asked if she is worried she will be called to testify, Conway said, “I’m not worried about that,” adding that she is unsure if she would be called.

Asked why the White House won't let officials testify, Conway said, “Why would we try to be complicit in an impeachment inquiry that we're not even sure what it’s about. What is it about? If I gave you a blank piece of paper, literally what would you write on it? What are we telling the American people right here and right now as to why we're impeaching the president?"

"Frankly, we don’t do that against anyone who’s being accused of anything," Conway added. "We don’t say, 'Come, let's book you, let’s put you on trial, and we'll figure it out as we go along if anything kind of pops. I mean this is just — that is just not the way our rule of law works."

In their request for Mulvaney's testimony, the chairmen of the committees leading the impeachment inquiry wrote that their probe has revealed he might have been "directly involved" in alleged efforts by Trump and others "to withhold a coveted White House meeting and nearly $400 million in security assistance" to pressure Ukraine to investigate the president's political rivals.

White House principal deputy press secretary Hogan Gidley said Tuesday that the administration wouldn't be inclined to allow senior advisers to participate in the inquiry.

Trump impeachment witness breaks week's no-show pattern

WASHINGTON — One witness was expected to appear Wednesday for a scheduled deposition before three House committees stemming from the impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump.

David Hale, the undersecretary of state for political affairs, arrived on Capitol Hill Wednesday morning to give his scheduled deposition before the House Intelligence, Foreign Affairs and Oversight committees in closed session.

Hale, a career diplomat, is likely to face questions regarding the removal of Ambassador Marie Yovanovitch, who said that she was fired at the direction of President Donald Trump. Philip Reeker, another career diplomat, told investigators at a previous hearing that Hale had stopped the publication of a statement in support of Yovanovitch.

Read the full story here.

Democrats zero in on three witnesses for public hearings

In preparing the next phase in their impeachment inquiry of President Donald Trump, Democrats have identified three witnesses as the strongest candidates for public hearings, NBC News has learned.

In the next few weeks, Democrats hope to feature the testimonies of former Ukraine Ambassador Marie Yovanovitch, the nation's current senior diplomat in Ukraine Bill Taylor and Army Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman, according to three sources with knowledge of the deliberations.

The sources stressed the ability of Taylor and Vindman give a firsthand accounts of their understanding that aid to Ukraine was tied to the country's revival of investigations that would serve the president's personal political interests. 

Trump official set for questions on Ukraine ambassador removal

David Hale, under secretary of state for political affairs, is due to appear at a closed door hearing Wednesday and is likely to face questions on the removal of Amb. Marie “Masha” Yovanovich, who has said she was fired by the direction of President Donald Trump

Career diplomat Phillip Reeker told investigators at a previous hearing that Hale had stopped the publication of a statement in support of Yovanovich.

Vindman will testify, if asked

A source familiar with the matter tells NBC News that Vindman will testify publicly in the impeachment inquiry, if asked. This source says he has not yet been asked.

Vindman will return to Capitol Hill on Thursday to review the transcript of his testimony, according to the source familiar.

Updated Friday impeachment inquiry deposition schedule

From an official working on the impeachment inquiry:

The following witnesses are expected to testify in closed session on Friday, Nov. 8:

— Acting White House Chief of Staff John Michael “Mick” Mulvaney

— OMB Associate Director for National Security Programs Mark Sandy

The Committees are in ongoing discussions with other witnesses and we look forward to their testimony.