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Trump impeachment: Analysis and news on the House charges and Senate acquittal of the president

The Senate trial on the two articles of impeachment against Trump, abuse of power and obstruction of Congress, ended with acquittal on both charges.
Image: Impeachment live blog
Chelsea Stahl / NBC News

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The fast-moving impeachment of President Donald Trump, stemming from his dealings with Ukraine, moved to the Senate for trial in January after the House voted a month earlier to adopt two articles of impeachment: abuse of power and obstruction of Congress.

The Senate voted in early February to acquit the president on both charges.

Trump's impeachment followed weeks of testimony related to his efforts to press Ukraine for investigations into Democratic rivals and hours of fiery debate over the process.

Trump is only the third president in U.S. history to be impeached. Read all of the breaking news and analysis on impeachment from NBC News' political reporters, as well as our teams on Capitol Hill and at the White House.

Trump impeachment highlights

Download the NBC News mobile app for the latest news on the impeachment inquiry

Live Blog

Diplomat testified that Putin, Orban poisoned Trump's views on Ukraine

WASHINGTON — A senior U.S. diplomat told Congress that he was briefed on conversations President Donald Trump had with Russia’s President Vladimir Putin and Hungary’s Prime Minister Viktor Orban in which the two foreign leaders talked Trump into a negative view about Ukraine and its new leader.

George Kent, a senior State Department official responsible for Europe, told House investigators that Putin and Orban, along with Trump personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani, had “shaped the president’s view of Ukraine and (President Volodymyr) Zelenskiy.” He said Trump’s conversations with the two leaders accounted for the change in Trump’s view of Zelenskiy from “very positive” after their first call on April 21 to “negative” just one month later when he met with advisers on Ukraine in the Oval Office.

Read more here.

NBC News' Garrett Haake reports on George Kent's testimony

Career diplomat took notes, believed Trump Ukraine conduct was ‘injurious to the rule of law,’ transcripts show

State Department official George Kent, a key witness in the impeachment inquiry of President Donald Trump, told House investigators last month he'd created memos of specific conversations he'd witnessed related to White House’s attempted quid pro quo that he said were “injurious to the rule of law, both in Ukraine and the U.S,” according to a transcript of his testimony made public Thursday.

Lawmakers have focused on Kent and other witnesses to establish that the Trump administration froze aid money as part of an attempt to pressure Ukraine to open politically advantageous probes.

Read his full transcript.

Chris Jansing breaks down the latest developments in the impeachment inquiry

Kennedy says he didn't mean to be disrespectful when he called Pelosi 'dumb'

Donald Trump Jr. defends tweeting name of person he said is the whistleblower

During a contentious exchange on ABC's "The View," Donald Trump Jr. defending tweeting the name of a person who some conservative outlets have alleged is the Ukraine whistleblower, saying that the name had been "out there."

"I think the reality of the answer is the whistleblower's name was on a little website called thedrudgereport a couple of days ago," he said. "I literally quote tweeted an article that had the guy's name in the title of the article."

"The name has been out there for five days," he later added.

Joe says Sen. Kennedy's Pelosi bash is degrading, hard to turn back from

John Bolton, Trump's former national security adviser, skips impeachment deposition

WASHINGTON — Former White House national security adviser John Bolton failed to appear Thursday for his closed-door deposition in the House impeachment inquiry, following the lead of other current and former Trump administration officials who have chosen not to show up.

Last week, Bolton — who was fired by Trump in September — was formally invited to testify before the three congressional committees in charge of questioning witnesses, but his lawyer, Charles Cooper, quickly made clear that his client was unwilling to appear voluntarily. Bolton has not been issued a subpoena, sources familiar with the inquiry said.

Bolton's no-show comes after his former top deputy, Charles Kupperman, skipped his own scheduled deposition amid efforts by the White House to block his appearance. Kupperman then filed a lawsuit asking a federal judge to rule on whether he must testify under a congressional subpoena.

Read the full story here.

ANALYSIS: As proceedings go public, Dems try to keep it simple

WASHINGTON — For the first time next Wednesday, with cameras rolling, House Democrats will begin broadcasting a dramatic story about the corruption of American democracy and governance that they contend not only reaches into the Oval Office, but bears the unmistakable fingerprints of President Donald Trump.

Their challenge in impeaching Trump is keeping the tale of his Ukraine scandal simple as they try to move forward through a thicket of Republican defensescharacters unfamiliar to the public; and constitutional, legal and political principles most Americans haven't considered since their last civics class.

"We have a tendency to get in the weeds on this," said Del. Stacey Plaskett, D-V.I., a former senior official in the Obama Justice Department who represents the Virgin Islands in Congress, and a member of the three-committee panel that has been conducting impeachment hearings behind closed doors. "I use the words extortion and bribery. I think those are words that Americans can understand."

Read the full analysis here.

Sen. Harris: If impeachment gets to Senate, I will be there